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Full-Text Articles in Law

Consenting To Computer Use, James Grimmelmann Dec 2016

Consenting To Computer Use, James Grimmelmann

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) makes it a crime to “access a computer without authorization or exceed authorized access.” Courts and commentators have struggled to explain what types of conduct by a computer user are “without authorization.” But this approach is backwards; authorization is not so much a question of what a computer user does, as it is a question of what a computer owner allows.

In other words, authorization under the CFAA is an issue of consent, not conduct; to understand authorization, we need to understand consent. Building on Peter Westen’s taxonomy of consent, I ...


The Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access To Digital Assets Act: Has The Law Caught Up With Technology?, Elizabeth Sy Jan 2016

The Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access To Digital Assets Act: Has The Law Caught Up With Technology?, Elizabeth Sy

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Code-Based Approach To Unauthorized Access Under The Computer Fraud Abuse Act, Patricia L. Bellia Jan 2016

A Code-Based Approach To Unauthorized Access Under The Computer Fraud Abuse Act, Patricia L. Bellia

Journal Articles

Thirty years ago, Congress passed the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) to combat the emerging problem of computer crime. The statute’s core prohibitions targeted one who “accesses” a computer “without authorization” or who “exceeds authorized access.” Over time, incremental statutory changes and large-scale technical changes have dramatically expanded the potential scope of the CFAA. The question of what constitutes unauthorized access has taken on far greater significance than it had thirty years ago, and courts remain deeply divided on this question. This Article explores the text, purpose, and history of the CFAA, as well as a range of ...


Authority And Authors And Codes, Michael J. Madison Jan 2016

Authority And Authors And Codes, Michael J. Madison

Articles

Contests over the meaning and application of the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) expose long-standing, complex questions about the sources and impacts of the concept of authority in law and culture. Accessing a computer network “without authorization” and by “exceeding authorized access” is forbidden by the CFAA. Courts are divided in their interpretation of this language in the statute. This Article first proposes to address the issue with an insight from social science research. Neither criminal nor civil liability under the CFAA should attach unless the alleged violator has transgressed some border or boundary that is rendered visible ...


The Emoji That Cost $20,000: Triggering Liability For Defamation On Social Media, Nicole Pelletier Jan 2016

The Emoji That Cost $20,000: Triggering Liability For Defamation On Social Media, Nicole Pelletier

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Note addresses the history of social media law in the U.S. legal system within the context of defamation claims and legislative acts to immunize social media websites. Using a British court’s finding of liability based on a tweeted emoji, Pelletier analyzes whether an emoji could trigger liability in the United States and juxtaposes the potential for individual user liability based on an emoji with the immunization granted to social media websites. Pelletier proposes new federal legislation that will place responsibility on social websites to notify users of potential liability arising from social media use.