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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Klein Water Treatment Facility: Model For The New Superfund Management Strategy – Or- The Importance Of Being In The Wrong Place At The Right Time???, David Brown Dec 2015

The Klein Water Treatment Facility: Model For The New Superfund Management Strategy – Or- The Importance Of Being In The Wrong Place At The Right Time???, David Brown

David C. Brown

12 pages.


Are "Legal" Marijuana Contracts "Illegal"?, Luke M. Scheuer Dec 2014

Are "Legal" Marijuana Contracts "Illegal"?, Luke M. Scheuer

Luke M Scheuer

America is currently in the midst of a “legal” marijuana business boom. In states which have legalized marijuana thousands of businesses have been created and are being openly operated despite the continued prohibition on their main product by the federal Controlled Substances Abuse Act. As a regular part of their business, these companies enter into contracts which violate the CSA, for example, every time they sell their main product. These businesses, and their stakeholders, rely upon the enforceability of these contracts in order to regulate their relationships. However, under the “illegality” or public policy defense to the enforcement of contracts ...


Surveying Colorado Sports Law, Adam Epstein Dec 2012

Surveying Colorado Sports Law, Adam Epstein

Adam Epstein

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview and explore some of the major sports law cases that have emanated from within the four corners of the state of Colorado or maneuvered through Denver’s Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. Colorado is a prime location for a wide range of cutting edge cases, decisions, discussions and events which have an impact on the relationship between sports and the law among the professional, amateur and recreational environments. Legal issues at Colorado-based educational institutions appear to have an affinity for and history of exposing and challenging the authority of NCAA ...


Can You Hear Me Up There? Giving Voice To Local Communities Imperative For Achieving Sustainability, Patricia E. Salkin Jul 2012

Can You Hear Me Up There? Giving Voice To Local Communities Imperative For Achieving Sustainability, Patricia E. Salkin

Patricia E. Salkin

Sustainable development is an international challenge that demands attention at all levels of government. The calls to action to achieve sustainability have varied over the last few decades. For example, in the 1970s and 1980s attention was focused on the need for environmental review and growth management strategies. In the 1990s the rhetoric shifted to smart growth and livable communities, and today, the issue has been reframed as advocates view sustainability through the lens of global warming and climate change. Regardless of the nomenclature, however, the end game is the same. While the United States as a whole speaks through ...


Rethinking Self-Incrimination, Voluntariness, And Coercion, Through A Perspective Of Jewish Law And Legal Theory, Samuel J. Levine Mar 2012

Rethinking Self-Incrimination, Voluntariness, And Coercion, Through A Perspective Of Jewish Law And Legal Theory, Samuel J. Levine

Samuel J. Levine

No abstract provided.


Rodney King And The Decriminalization Of Police Brutality In America: Direct And Judicial Access To The Grand Jury As Remedies For Victims Of Police Brutality When The Prosecutor Declines To Prosecute, Peter L. Davis May 2011

Rodney King And The Decriminalization Of Police Brutality In America: Direct And Judicial Access To The Grand Jury As Remedies For Victims Of Police Brutality When The Prosecutor Declines To Prosecute, Peter L. Davis

Peter L. Davis

This Article begins with the premise that, despite political rhetoric and occasional prosecutions to the contrary, police brutality has been effectively decriminalized in this country. The Article adopts the Rodney King case as the paradigm for examining this phenomenon. Scrutinizing the culture and semantics of police brutality, the author concludes that a double standard of criminality exists in the United States, under which different rules apply to a police than to everyone else. This double standard is socially dysfunctional. Particularly among minorities, it leads to a sense of cynicism about our legal system that can result in civil disorder when ...