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Full-Text Articles in Law

Falling Out Of Love With America: The Clinton Impeachment And The Madisonian Constitution, Frank O. Bowman Iii Jan 2001

Falling Out Of Love With America: The Clinton Impeachment And The Madisonian Constitution, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

First, were the Nixon and Clinton affairs truly as different as my memory makes them? Were the villains of Watergate as villainous and the heroes as heroic as I remember them? Were nearly all the players on both sides of l'affaire Lewinsky as shallow and fatuous as they seemed? Or to put the question in broader historical context, was the impeachment of Bill Clinton truly distinct, not only from Watergate, but from all of the other (fortunately few) occasions on which a president was seriously threatened with removal from office? Second, if the Clinton impeachment really was as bizarre ...


An Essential Element Of Fair Trade And Sustainable Development In The Ftaa Is An Enforceable Social Clause, Terry Collingsworth Jan 2001

An Essential Element Of Fair Trade And Sustainable Development In The Ftaa Is An Enforceable Social Clause, Terry Collingsworth

Richmond Journal of Global Law & Business

Multinational companies (“MNCs”) and governments that are fantasizing about a Free Trade Area of the Americas (“FTAA”) should accept the reality that the FTAA is not politically viable for the time being unless the issues of labor rights and other social conditions are addressed in a manner demonstrating that these rights are consistent with commercial rights that are protected in careful detail in many pages of the draft FTAA agreement.


Presidential Ethics: Should A Law Degree Make A Difference?, Nancy B. Rapoport Jan 2001

Presidential Ethics: Should A Law Degree Make A Difference?, Nancy B. Rapoport

Scholarly Works

Two of the nation's most controversial presidents, Nixon and Clinton, were both lawyers, and both of them had ethics-related problems while in office. This essay reviews whether any model ethics rules force lawyer-presidents to behave at a higher standard than non-lawyer-presidents; then it discusses the implications for legal education if we really do want lawyers to go above and beyond the norm of behavior.