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Civil rights

2005

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Articles 1 - 30 of 42

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Impact Of Alcohol & Tobacco Advertising On The Latino Community As A Civil Rights Issue, Katherine Culliton Nov 2005

The Impact Of Alcohol & Tobacco Advertising On The Latino Community As A Civil Rights Issue, Katherine Culliton

KATHERINE CULLITON-GONZÁLEZ

No abstract provided.


Tribute To Judge Merhige, Orran L. Brown Nov 2005

Tribute To Judge Merhige, Orran L. Brown

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Untold Story Of The Rest Of The Americans With Disabilities Act, Michael Waterstone Nov 2005

The Untold Story Of The Rest Of The Americans With Disabilities Act, Michael Waterstone

Vanderbilt Law Review

The Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA")' can be described as the All-Star team of civil rights legislation. The framers of the ADA sought to create sweeping change in nearly every facet of the lives of people with disabilities. To achieve these ambitious goals, the framers assembled the best and brightest parts of other civil rights legislation: pieces of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 04 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Fair Housing Act. The end result was a comprehensive statute with three major parts ...


Supreme Court Nomination John G. Roberts: Hearing Before The S. Comm. On The Judiciary, 109th Cong., Sept. 15, 2005 (Statement Of Peter B. Edelman, Prof. Of Law, Geo. U. L. Center), Peter B. Edelman Sep 2005

Supreme Court Nomination John G. Roberts: Hearing Before The S. Comm. On The Judiciary, 109th Cong., Sept. 15, 2005 (Statement Of Peter B. Edelman, Prof. Of Law, Geo. U. L. Center), Peter B. Edelman

Testimony Before Congress

No abstract provided.


Causation And Attenuation In The Slavery Reparations Debate, Kaimipono D. Wenger Sep 2005

Causation And Attenuation In The Slavery Reparations Debate, Kaimipono D. Wenger

ExpressO

The success or failure of slavery reparations will depend on causation. Many criticisms of reparations have focused on the attenuated nature of the harm, suggesting that modern claimants are not connected to slaves, that modern payers are not connected to slave owners, and that harms suffered by modern Blacks cannot be connected to slavery. This Article examines these attenuation concerns and finds that they come in three related but distinct varieties: Victim attenuation, wrongdoer attenuation, and act attenuation. These three components, defined in this Article, show themselves in a number of interrelated arguments.

The Article then discusses how ideas about ...


Going Courting: How Same-Sex Marriage Opponents Came To Love The Courts, Robert Lipkin Sep 2005

Going Courting: How Same-Sex Marriage Opponents Came To Love The Courts, Robert Lipkin

Robert Justin Lipkin

No abstract provided.


Solomon Amendment, Gerald A. Daniel Aug 2005

Solomon Amendment, Gerald A. Daniel

ExpressO

Review of the history and current status of the Solomon Amendment with respect to law schools and law school organizations opposed to military recruiting policies which exclude homosexual applicants from consideration for military service.


Rfk, Day Of Affirmation Speech And Human Rights In America, Stuart Weinstein Aug 2005

Rfk, Day Of Affirmation Speech And Human Rights In America, Stuart Weinstein

ExpressO

An examination of Robert Kennedy historic Day of Affirmation speech made forty years ago. Is the role he envisioned for the US to play in international affairs and in advancing the cause of freedom and social justice for all humanity relvant in a post-Iraq abu Gharaib world?


Applying 42 U.S.C. Section 1981 To Claims Of Consumer Discrimination, Abby Morrow Richardson Jun 2005

Applying 42 U.S.C. Section 1981 To Claims Of Consumer Discrimination, Abby Morrow Richardson

ExpressO

This Comment explores several interesting legal questions regarding the proper interpretation 42 U.S.C. Section 1981, which prohibits racial discrimination in contracting, when discrimination arises in the context of a consumer retail contract. It explores how the Fifth Circuit’s and other federal courts’ narrow interpretation of section 1981’s application in a retail setting, which allows plaintiffs to invoke the statute only when they have been prevented from completing their purchase, is contrary to the statute’s express language, Congressional intent, and to evolving concepts of contract theory, all of which encompass our society’s deep commitment to ...


For Whom Does The Bell Toll: The Bell Tolls For Brown?, Angela Onwuachi-Willig May 2005

For Whom Does The Bell Toll: The Bell Tolls For Brown?, Angela Onwuachi-Willig

Faculty Scholarship

This review essay analyzes Derrick Bell's provocative new book, Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board of Education and the Unfulfilled Hopes for Racial Reform (2004). In Silent Covenants, Professor Bell reviews Brown v. Board of Education, and inquires "whether another approach than the one embraced by the Brown decision might have been more effective and less disruptive in the always-contentious racial arena." Specifically, Professor Bell joins black conservatives in critiquing what he describes as a misguided focus on achieving racial balance in schools and argues that the quality of education for minority children, in particular Blacks, would have been better ...


Interning The “Non-Alien” Other: The Illusory Protections Of Citizenship, Natsu Taylor Saito Apr 2005

Interning The “Non-Alien” Other: The Illusory Protections Of Citizenship, Natsu Taylor Saito

Law and Contemporary Problems

Saito draws parallels between the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII and the current actions being taken by the US government as it seeks out terrorists in the post-9/11 world. The action of unequal prosecution of citizens based on race has roots that extend far back in American history, and the unfair internment of citizens in the 20th century should not be considered an aberration of public policy.


The Ku Klux Klan Act And The Civil Rights Revolution: How Civil Rights Litigation Came To Regulate Police And Correctional Officer Misconduct., Alan W. Clarke Mar 2005

The Ku Klux Klan Act And The Civil Rights Revolution: How Civil Rights Litigation Came To Regulate Police And Correctional Officer Misconduct., Alan W. Clarke

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Modern civil rights litigation stems from the Ku Klux Klan Act, otherwise known as the Civil Rights Act of 1871. Congress codified this Act in the United States Code under Section 1983 of Title 42. No other law is more central to present day police and correctional officer accountability. The Civil Rights statute effectuates broad constitutional protections set in place in the aftermath of the Civil War. Congress designed this Act to change over time and intertwine with a continuing history of expanding rights. Section 1983 provides a remedy to any person who experienced another person, acting under the color ...


Lawrence-Ium: The Densest Known Substance, John Culhane Jan 2005

Lawrence-Ium: The Densest Known Substance, John Culhane

John G. Culhane

No abstract provided.


Writing On, Around, And Through Lawrence V. Texas, John G. Culhane Jan 2005

Writing On, Around, And Through Lawrence V. Texas, John G. Culhane

John G. Culhane

No abstract provided.


Counter-Stories: Maintaining And Expanding Civil Liberties In Wartime, Mark A. Graber Jan 2005

Counter-Stories: Maintaining And Expanding Civil Liberties In Wartime, Mark A. Graber

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Remarks As Delivered At Cornell University, William Jefferson Clinton Jan 2005

Remarks As Delivered At Cornell University, William Jefferson Clinton

Cornell International Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Review Of David E. Bernstein's "You Can't Say That!--The Growing Threat To Civil Liberties From Antidiscrimination Laws", Ivan E. Bodensteiner Jan 2005

Review Of David E. Bernstein's "You Can't Say That!--The Growing Threat To Civil Liberties From Antidiscrimination Laws", Ivan E. Bodensteiner

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Jack And Jill Go To Court: Litigating A Peer Sexual Harassment Case Under Title Ix, Susan P. Stuart Jan 2005

Jack And Jill Go To Court: Litigating A Peer Sexual Harassment Case Under Title Ix, Susan P. Stuart

Law Faculty Publications

Title IX peer sexual harassment cases present challenges to litigators because of the unique educational environment in which these cases arise. This Article attempts to educate litigators on the prima facie case, evidentiary issues, and the overall presentation of peer sexual harassment cases.


Representing Americans Employed Abroad: The Extraterritorial Application Of Federal And State Anti-Discrimination Laws, Robert B. Stulberg, Amy F. Shulman Jan 2005

Representing Americans Employed Abroad: The Extraterritorial Application Of Federal And State Anti-Discrimination Laws, Robert B. Stulberg, Amy F. Shulman

ILSA Journal of International & Comparative Law

More than two million American citizens work in civilian jobs outside of the United States.


Disciplinary Evolution And Scholarly Expansion: Legal History In The United States, Michael H. Hoeflich, Stephen M. Sheppard Jan 2005

Disciplinary Evolution And Scholarly Expansion: Legal History In The United States, Michael H. Hoeflich, Stephen M. Sheppard

Faculty Articles

In the United States, the dawn of the twenty-first century has ushered in a period of both transformation and expansion in the study and teaching of legal history. In less than a quarter century, the teaching of legal history, both in law schools and in undergraduate and graduate history programs, has mushroomed from a rather esoteric subject to one that now is considered mainstream.

The American Society for Legal History, the major professional organization of legal historians in the United States, now has a core membership in excess of 1000, and its annual meeting fills two days with lectures, seminars ...


Statutes Of Limitations: A Policy Analysis In The Context Of Reparations Litigation, Suzette M. Malveaux Jan 2005

Statutes Of Limitations: A Policy Analysis In The Context Of Reparations Litigation, Suzette M. Malveaux

Articles

This article discusses the underlying policy rationales for statutes of limitations and their exceptions, as demonstrated by Supreme Court precedents. This article explores limitations law in the context of a case brought by African-American survivors of the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 who sought restitution from the local government for its participation in one of the worst race riots in American history, in violation of their constitutional and federal civil rights. Using the Tulsa case as an exemplar, this article analyzes the propriety of the case’s dismissal as time-barred, and contends that this outcome was unwarranted under precedents and ...


The Impact Of International Human Rights Developments On Sexual Minority Rights, Arthur S. Leonard Jan 2005

The Impact Of International Human Rights Developments On Sexual Minority Rights, Arthur S. Leonard

Articles & Chapters

The Supreme Court's decision in Lawrence v. Texas (2003) marked the first time that tribunal took notice of how foreign and international courts were dealing with the civil rights claims of lesbians and gay men as part of its discussion of American constitutional law. If this evinces a new openness by the Court to looking at such external sources in gay rights cases, what would it find on the major legal issues now facing the LGBT community in the United States? This article summarizes developments abroad on legal recognition of same-sex partners (including for purposes of immigration status) and ...


Christina M. Cerna On The Development Of Positive Obligations Under The European Convention On Human Rights By The European Court Of Human Rights By Alastair Mowbray. Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2004. 239pp., Christina M. Cerna Jan 2005

Christina M. Cerna On The Development Of Positive Obligations Under The European Convention On Human Rights By The European Court Of Human Rights By Alastair Mowbray. Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2004. 239pp., Christina M. Cerna

Human Rights & Human Welfare

A review of:

The Development of Positive Obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights by the European Court of Human Rights by Alastair Mowbray. Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2004. 239pp.


Two "Wrongs" Do/Can Make A Right: Remembering Mathematics, Physics, & Various Legal Analogies (Two Negatives Make A Positive; Are Remedies Wrong?) The Law Has Made Him Equal, But Man Has Not, John C. Duncan Jr Jan 2005

Two "Wrongs" Do/Can Make A Right: Remembering Mathematics, Physics, & Various Legal Analogies (Two Negatives Make A Positive; Are Remedies Wrong?) The Law Has Made Him Equal, But Man Has Not, John C. Duncan Jr

Journal Publications

This article demonstrates the incomplete logic and inconsistent legal reasoning used in the argument against affirmative action. The phrase "two wrongs don't make a right" is often heard in addressing various attempts to equalize, to balance, and to correct the acknowledged wrongs of slavery and segregation and their derivative effects. Yet, "two wrongs do/can make a right" has a positive connotation. This article reviews the history of societal and judicial wrongs against Blacks, as well as the evolution of the narrowing in legal reasoning concerning discrimination against minorities, including Blacks. Next, the legal reasoning behind legacy programs will ...


The Politics Of Infertility: Recognizing Coverage Exclusions As Discrimination, Elizabeth Pendo Jan 2005

The Politics Of Infertility: Recognizing Coverage Exclusions As Discrimination, Elizabeth Pendo

All Faculty Scholarship

Infertility affects approximately ten percent of the reproductive-age population in the United States, and strikes people of every race, ethnicity and socio-economic level. It is recognized by the medical community as a disease, one with devastating physical, psychological, and financial effects.

In 1998, the Supreme Court held in Bragdon v. Abbott that reproduction is a major life activity within the meaning of the ADA. Many lawyers, activists and scholars thought that coverage for infertility treatment would follow soon after. In fact, in 2003 in the first major case applying Bragdon to health benefits, Saks v. Franklin Covey, the Second Circuit ...


"Can I See Your Papers?" Local Police Enforcement Of Federal Immigration Law Post 9/11 And Asian American Permanent Foreignness, Mohar Ray Jan 2005

"Can I See Your Papers?" Local Police Enforcement Of Federal Immigration Law Post 9/11 And Asian American Permanent Foreignness, Mohar Ray

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


The Constitution Glimpsed From Tule Lake, Patrick O. Gudridge Jan 2005

The Constitution Glimpsed From Tule Lake, Patrick O. Gudridge

Articles

No abstract provided.


Spotlight On Jon Velie: Man On A Thirteen Year Mission, Lydia Edwards Jan 2005

Spotlight On Jon Velie: Man On A Thirteen Year Mission, Lydia Edwards

The Modern American

No abstract provided.


Dignity In Race Jurisprudence, Christopher A. Bracey Jan 2005

Dignity In Race Jurisprudence, Christopher A. Bracey

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Racial justice demands dignity; the acknowledgment and affirmation of the equal humanity of people of color. Denying dignity on the basis of color creates racial subordination, which triggers dignitary harms such as individual acts of racism and communal exclusion leading to diminished health, wealth, income, employment and social status. The legal recognition of dignity is therefore a prerequisite to political and social equality. For Americans of African descent, dignity was long denied by the legal endorsement of slavery and the degrading policies of segregation. The struggle to be treated equally human eventually found success in landmark cases such as Brown ...


Retaliation, Deborah Brake Jan 2005

Retaliation, Deborah Brake

Articles

This Article takes a comprehensive look at retaliation and its place in discrimination law. The Article begins by examining current social science literature to understand how retaliation operates as a social practice to silence challenges to discrimination and preserve inequality. Then, using the recent controversy over whether to imply a private right of action for retaliation from a general ban on discrimination as a launching point, the Article theorizes the connections between retaliation and discrimination as legal constructs, and contends that retaliation should be viewed as a species of intentional discrimination. The Article argues that situating retaliation as a practice ...