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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Law

Child Support: The K Factor And The Guideline, Assembly Committee On Judiciary Nov 1995

Child Support: The K Factor And The Guideline, Assembly Committee On Judiciary

California Assembly

No abstract provided.


West Virginia Child Support Guidelines: The Melson Formula, Charles T. Berry Apr 1995

West Virginia Child Support Guidelines: The Melson Formula, Charles T. Berry

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Awarding Child Support Against The Impoverished Parent: Straying From Statutory Guidelines And Using Ssi In Setting The Amount, Rachael K. House Jan 1995

Awarding Child Support Against The Impoverished Parent: Straying From Statutory Guidelines And Using Ssi In Setting The Amount, Rachael K. House

Kentucky Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Constitutionality Of Punishing Deadbeat Parents: The Child Support Recovery Act Of 1992 After United States V. Lopez, Ronald S. Kornreich Jan 1995

The Constitutionality Of Punishing Deadbeat Parents: The Child Support Recovery Act Of 1992 After United States V. Lopez, Ronald S. Kornreich

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


Equal Protection Jan 1995

Equal Protection

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Fathers, The Welfare System, And The Virtues And Perils Of Child-Support Enforcement, David L. Chambers Jan 1995

Fathers, The Welfare System, And The Virtues And Perils Of Child-Support Enforcement, David L. Chambers

Articles

For half a century, Aid to Families with Dependent Children ("AFDC")' -the program of federally supported cash assistance to low-income families with children-has been oddly conceived. Congress has chosen to make assistance available almost solely to low-income single-parent families, not all low-income parents with children. At first many of the eligible single parents were women whose husbands had died. Over time, a growing majority were women who had been married to their children's father but who had separated or divorced. Today, to an ever increasing extent, they are women who were never married to the fathers of their children.2