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Full-Text Articles in Law

Review Of The Book The Fight Against Book Bans: Perspectives From The Field, John A. Drobnicki Feb 2024

Review Of The Book The Fight Against Book Bans: Perspectives From The Field, John A. Drobnicki

Publications and Research

Review of the book The Fight against Book Bans: Perspectives from the Field, edited by Shannon M. Oltmann.


Review Of The Book Denial Of Genocides In The Twenty-First Century, John A. Drobnicki Nov 2023

Review Of The Book Denial Of Genocides In The Twenty-First Century, John A. Drobnicki

Publications and Research

Review of the book Denial of Genocides in the Twenty-First Century, edited by Bedross Der Matossian.


Care Work, Gender Equality, And Abortion: Lessons From Comparative Feminist Constitutionalism, Linda C. Mcclain Sep 2023

Care Work, Gender Equality, And Abortion: Lessons From Comparative Feminist Constitutionalism, Linda C. Mcclain

Faculty Scholarship

Julie Suk, After Misogyny: How the Law Fails Women and What to Do About It (2023).

Julie Suk’s ambitious book, After Misogyny: How the Law Fails Women and What to Do About It, contributes to a feminist literature on equality and care spanning centuries and national boundaries, yet offers timely diagnoses and prescriptions for the United States at a very particular moment. That “moment” includes being four years into the COVID-19 pandemic and over one year into the post-Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey world wrought by Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. That moment …


When Machines Can Be Judge, Jury, And Executioner: Justice In The Age Of Artificial Intelligence (Book Review), Stacy Fowler Sep 2023

When Machines Can Be Judge, Jury, And Executioner: Justice In The Age Of Artificial Intelligence (Book Review), Stacy Fowler

Faculty Articles

In When Machines Can Be Judge, Jury, and Executioner, former federal judge Katherine Forrest raises concerns over the pervasive use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the American justice system to produce risks and need assessments (RNA) regarding the probability of recidivism for citizens charged with a crime. Forrest’s argument centers on AI’s primary focus on utilitarian outcomes when assessing liberty for individual citizens. This approach leads Forrest to the conclusion that in its current form, AI is “ill-suited to the criminal justice context.” Forrest contends that AI should instead be programmed to focus on John Rawl’ 'concept of justice as …


Beyond More Accurate Algorithms: Takeaways From Mccleskey Revisited, Ngozi Okidegbe Apr 2023

Beyond More Accurate Algorithms: Takeaways From Mccleskey Revisited, Ngozi Okidegbe

Faculty Scholarship

McCleskey v. Kemp1 operates as a barrier to using the Equal Protection Clause to achieve racial justice in criminal administration.2 By restricting the use of statistical evidence in equal protection challenges, McCleskey stifled the power of the discriminatory intent doctrine to combat the colorblind racism emanating from facially neutral criminal law statutes and governmental actions.3 But what if McCleskey had been decided differently? Given that Washington v. Davis4 held that the challenged law or governmental action had to be “traced to a discriminatory racial purpose,”5 could McCleskey have articulated an approach to equal protection doctrine …


Policy's Place In Pedestrian Infrastructure (Book Review), Michael L. Smith Jan 2023

Policy's Place In Pedestrian Infrastructure (Book Review), Michael L. Smith

Faculty Articles

Angie Schmitt's Right of Way: Race, Class, and the Silent Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America delves into the complex, multi-layered phenomenon of how traffic infrastructure and policies systematically disadvantage pedestrians and contribute to thousands of deaths and injuries each year. Despite the breadth of the problem and its often-technical aspects, Schmitt presents the problem in an engaging and approachable manner through a step-by-step analysis combining background, statistics, and anecdotes.

While Right of Way tends to focus on infrastructure design, it offers much for legal scholars, lawyers, and policymakers. Schmitt addresses several policy issues at length in the book. But …


Ethical Lawyering: The Role Of Honor, Conscience, And Codes (Reviewing Michael S. Ariens, The Lawyer’S Conscience: A History Of American Lawyer Ethics), Vincent R. Johnson Jan 2023

Ethical Lawyering: The Role Of Honor, Conscience, And Codes (Reviewing Michael S. Ariens, The Lawyer’S Conscience: A History Of American Lawyer Ethics), Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

Michael Ariens’ new book, The Lawyer’s Conscience: A History of American Lawyer Ethics, is a monumental work, rooted in his decades of excellent scholarship in the fields of attorney professional responsibility and legal history. The Lawyer’s Conscience captures the great sweep and key features of the roughly 250-year period in American legal ethics running from colonial times to the present day. Richly detailed and vividly presented, the story takes the reader on a grand tour of the landmark events and changing ideas that have defined the aspirations, responsibilities, and accountability of members of the American legal profession.


Burning Down The House: How Libertarian Philosophy Was Corrupted By Delusion And Greed (Book Review), Julie Tedjeske Crane Jan 2023

Burning Down The House: How Libertarian Philosophy Was Corrupted By Delusion And Greed (Book Review), Julie Tedjeske Crane

Faculty Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


The Role Of Departments In The Design Of The Federal Government, Jack M. Beermann Nov 2022

The Role Of Departments In The Design Of The Federal Government, Jack M. Beermann

Faculty Scholarship

Reviewing Blake Emerson,The Departmental Structure of Executive Power: Subordinate Checks from Madison to Mueller, 38 Yale J. Reg. 90 (2021)


Adherents to the unitary executive theory, which posits that the Constitution grants the President complete and absolute control over the execution of the law, claim that their view is required by the text of the Constitution, especially Article II’s vesting clause which proclaims that the “Executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America.” As Justice Scalia put it, “this does not mean some of the executive power, but all of the …


Four Privacy Stories And Two Hard Cases, A Comment On Skinner-Thompson's Privacy At The Margins, Jessica Silbey Jul 2022

Four Privacy Stories And Two Hard Cases, A Comment On Skinner-Thompson's Privacy At The Margins, Jessica Silbey

Faculty Scholarship

Scott Skinner-Thompson's new book, Privacy at the Margins, is what I would call a "fourth-generation" study of privacy law. Privacy's contours and justifications have been debated over the course of the twentieth century, first to establish it as a matter deserving legal protection (roughly the first half of the twentieth century), 2 then to iterate its various common law and constitutional variations (starting in the 1960s), 3 and since the computer and internet revolution of the 1990s, to reevaluate privacy's growing importance but waning presence in the digitally-networked age.4 The third-generation of privacy scholarship has been a fast-growing area …


Nondelegation And Originalism, Jack M. Beermann May 2022

Nondelegation And Originalism, Jack M. Beermann

Faculty Scholarship

Originalism certainly isn’t what it used to be. From a fringe theory with few adherents it has, in recent decades, become the dominant conservative legal weapon deployed against nearly every liberal legal development since the dawn of the twentieth century, particularly the acceptance of the administrative state and the delegation of rulemaking power to agencies. Professor Kurt Eggert’s recent article adds to the mounting evidence that originalism is not a credible legal theory especially when deployed against Congress’s choices concerning the proper structure of the regulatory state.


Recovering Feminist Lessons From The Past For A Less Carceral Future, Aziza Ahmed Apr 2022

Recovering Feminist Lessons From The Past For A Less Carceral Future, Aziza Ahmed

Faculty Scholarship

In a moment when mass incarceration, police reform, and abolition are dominating national headlines, Aya Gruber’s book, The Feminist War on Crime: The Unexpected Role of Women’s Liberation in Mass Incarceration, takes on one of the most complicated questions of the politics of policing and incarceration: gender violence. Her book provides a history of the uncomfortable relationship between the carceral state and feminist organizing to end violence against women. And, it offers a path forward that begins to address mistakes of the past by reigniting those modes of feminism focused on poverty, welfare, and race that were sidelined with …


How Racism Persists In Its Power, Deborah N. Archer Apr 2022

How Racism Persists In Its Power, Deborah N. Archer

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Fire Next Time. By James Baldwin.


What Is The Law's Role In A Recession?, Gabriel Rauterberg, Joshua Younger Mar 2022

What Is The Law's Role In A Recession?, Gabriel Rauterberg, Joshua Younger

Reviews

In March 2020, the world faced not only a public health emergency but also one of the most profound shocks to the global economy in the modern era — a shock deeper and broader than any other in eighty years. Never before had virtually all of the world’s economies suffered a contraction at the same time (Tooze, p. 5). Global output decreased by nearly 3.4% in 2020, the largest contraction since the Second World War. The United States saw the largest recorded demand shock in its history (-32.9%), and the unemployment rate peaked around 15% during 2020, higher than at …


Lawyers, Mistakes, And Moral Growth, Vincent R. Johnson Jan 2022

Lawyers, Mistakes, And Moral Growth, Vincent R. Johnson

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Vincent R. Johnson, professor at St. Mary's University School of Law in San Antonio, Texas, reviews The Man in the Ditch: A Redemption Story for Today by Dallas attorney Mike H. Bassett.


The Public Trust And The Chicago Lakefront: Review Of Kearney & Merrill’S Lakefront: Public Trust And Private Rights In Chicago (Cornell U. Press, 2021), Michael C. Blumm Jan 2022

The Public Trust And The Chicago Lakefront: Review Of Kearney & Merrill’S Lakefront: Public Trust And Private Rights In Chicago (Cornell U. Press, 2021), Michael C. Blumm

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

Joseph Kearney and Thomas Merrill’s brilliantly illustrated LAKEFRONT is sure to win American legal history awards for its riveting history of the machinations behind the preservation of the magnificent Chicago lakefront, now dominated by public spaces. The authors weave together a compelling account of how the law affected the development of the post-fire Chicago in the late 19th and 20th centuries—largely made by lawyers and courts and only ratified by legislatures. The book’s title suggests that the story is largely about the public trust doctrine (PTD). But the doctrine is hardly the centerpiece of the authors’ story. What they have …


The Bi-Partisan Enabling Of Presidential Power: A Review Of David Driesen's The Specter Of Dictatorship: Judicial Enabling Of Presidential Power (2021), Jed Handelsman Shugerman Jan 2022

The Bi-Partisan Enabling Of Presidential Power: A Review Of David Driesen's The Specter Of Dictatorship: Judicial Enabling Of Presidential Power (2021), Jed Handelsman Shugerman

Faculty Scholarship

In "The Specter of Dictatorship: Judicial Enabling of Presidential Power," David Driesen questions the unitary executive theory and other doctrines of unchecked executive power. He offers primarily a critique of purposivism, a mix of original public meaning and more recent history illuminating those purposes: the Founders’ anti-tyranny purpose and then the rise of European tyranny from Nazi Germany to contemporary Hungary, Turkey, and Poland.

This review first focuses on Driesen’s approach to Congress: He identifies the broad congressional delegation of powers to the president as a source of expansive executive power, but he does not entertain that doctrines of deference …


Illegal Sex Toy Patents, W. Nicholson Price Ii May 2021

Illegal Sex Toy Patents, W. Nicholson Price Ii

Reviews

In Patenting Pleasure, Professors Sarah Rajec and Andrew Gilden highlight a surprising incongruity: while many areas of U.S. law are profoundly hostile to sexuality in general and the technology of sex in particular, the patent system is not. Instead, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has over the decades issued thousands of patents on sex toys—from vibrators to AI, and everything in between. This incongruity is especially odd because patent law has long incorporated a doctrine that specifically tied patentability to the usefulness of the invention, and up until the end of the 20th century one strand of that …


Book Review: Social Media And Democracy: The State Of The Field And Prospects For Reform, Cynthia W. Bassett Apr 2021

Book Review: Social Media And Democracy: The State Of The Field And Prospects For Reform, Cynthia W. Bassett

Faculty Publications

Social Media and Democracy illuminates the empirical social science research done to date to tease apart the effects social media has had on representative democracies. It is a collection of essays by academic social scientists researching the intersection of social media and democracy from a variety of angles.


Mega-Dams And Indigenous Human Rights, Kate E. Britt Jan 2021

Mega-Dams And Indigenous Human Rights, Kate E. Britt

Law Librarian Scholarship

Mega-Dams and Indigenous Human Rights (“Mega-Dams”) is a 2020 monograph by Itzchak Kornfeld. Kornfeld is a law professor with extensive experience working with governments and non-governmental organizations on the legal and geological aspects of water development, water sustainability, and sustainable development of land. Mega-Dams reflects this expertise, as well as the author's express opinions.


Lawyers, Mistakes, And Moral Growth (Reviewing Mike H. Bassett, The Man In The Ditch: A Redemption Story For Today), Vincent R. Johnson Jan 2021

Lawyers, Mistakes, And Moral Growth (Reviewing Mike H. Bassett, The Man In The Ditch: A Redemption Story For Today), Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

In the literature of legal ethics, relatively little is said about the psychic turmoil that lawyers face while anticipating or defending a grievance, malpractice claim, or criminal charge. Even less is said about how lawyers who are found guilty of violating professional standards should go about rebuilding their reputations and personal lives after such proceedings have run their course, often with embarrassing results having been made public. Against this bleak backdrop, a dazzlingly introspective and hopeful book about lawyers and their mistakes-and about their suffering and possible moral growth-has been published.


Book Review, Aamir S. Abdullah Jan 2021

Book Review, Aamir S. Abdullah

Publications

No abstract provided.


A Grammar Of Legal Thought, Derek H. Kiernan-Johnson Jan 2021

A Grammar Of Legal Thought, Derek H. Kiernan-Johnson

Publications

No abstract provided.


Decolonization As Dialectic Process In Law And Literature, Laura Nyantung Beny Dec 2020

Decolonization As Dialectic Process In Law And Literature, Laura Nyantung Beny

Reviews

The Battle for International Law addresses the South-North contest over the content and structure of international law during the period of decolonization in the global South (1955-1975). Edited volumes are inherently risky because the quality and perspectives of the various chapters can vary widely, resulting in thematic incoherency. However, J. von Bernstorff and P. Dann have successfully assembled many excellent chapters on varied topics by a diverse range of authors. Each chapter contributes significantly to the editors’ overall goal “to provide an intellectual history of the transformation of international law in the 1950s to 1970s and to offer a better …


Justice As Message Symposium: What We See When We See Law … Through The Eyes Of Dame Laura Knight, Diane Marie Amann Dec 2020

Justice As Message Symposium: What We See When We See Law … Through The Eyes Of Dame Laura Knight, Diane Marie Amann

Scholarly Works

The eye cannot help but be drawn to the cover of Justice as Message, the new analysis by Carsten Stahn of, to quote the subtitle, Expressivist Foundations of International Criminal Justice. On the high-gloss paper jacket we see a tableau of blacks and browns and olive drab, accented only by the purple of a lawyer’s robe and the teal of a dossier perched on the bar behind him. In front, we see that the bench is buried in paper – paper that turns to ashes as the back wall gives way to a vision of buildings in ruin …


Do Lawyers Need Economists? Review Of Katja Langenbucher, Economic Transplants: On Lawmaking For Corporations And Capital Markets (Cambridge U. Press, 2017), Reuven S. Avi-Yonah Oct 2020

Do Lawyers Need Economists? Review Of Katja Langenbucher, Economic Transplants: On Lawmaking For Corporations And Capital Markets (Cambridge U. Press, 2017), Reuven S. Avi-Yonah

Law & Economics Working Papers

Katja Langenbucher’s outstanding book seeks to address the question of why and in what ways have lawyers been importing economic theories into a legal environment, and how has this shaped scholarly research, judicial and legislative work? Since the financial crisis, corporate or capital markets law has been the focus of attention by academia and media. Formal modelling has been used to describe how capital markets work and, later, has been criticized for its abstract assumptions. Empirical legal studies and regulatory impact assessments offered different ways forward. This excellent book presents a new approach to the risks and benefits of interdisciplinary …


Keeping Up With New Legal Titles, Franklin L. Runge Jul 2020

Keeping Up With New Legal Titles, Franklin L. Runge

Library Scholarship

This review examines Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System, a new book by Alec Karakatsanis.


In The Midst Of Change, A Few Truths Remain—A Review Of Trazenfeld And Jarvis’S Florida Legal Malpractice Law, Jan L. Jacobowitz Ms. Jul 2020

In The Midst Of Change, A Few Truths Remain—A Review Of Trazenfeld And Jarvis’S Florida Legal Malpractice Law, Jan L. Jacobowitz Ms.

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Abstract forthcoming.


Book Review: The Long Journey To Software Valuation: Risks And Rewards Ahead By Dwight Olson, Duncan C. Card Jun 2020

Book Review: The Long Journey To Software Valuation: Risks And Rewards Ahead By Dwight Olson, Duncan C. Card

Canadian Journal of Law and Technology

One of the most difficult challenges for any technology start-up, and for its investors, is how to assess the commercial value of their innovative product or service solution. Much-needed guidance on that challenge has finally arrived. Dwight Olson’s The Long Journey To Software Valuation, released on March 1st of this year, provides tremendous assistance for both owners of those assets and all potential investors. In fact, the arrival of Mr. Olson’s book is a relief. As my law practice has been, and remains, devoted to aggressively commercializing technology (including software) for over 25 years, I personally know how welcome …


Examining Death Penalty Ballot Measures: A Review Of Austin Sarat’S The Death Penalty On The Ballot, Michael Conklin Jun 2020

Examining Death Penalty Ballot Measures: A Review Of Austin Sarat’S The Death Penalty On The Ballot, Michael Conklin

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.