Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Baker v. Carr

Election Law

Journal

University of Richmond Law Review

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Redistricting In A Post-Shaw Era: A Small Treatise Accompanied By Districting Guidelines For Legislators, Litigants, And Courts, Katharine Inglis Butler Jan 2002

Redistricting In A Post-Shaw Era: A Small Treatise Accompanied By Districting Guidelines For Legislators, Litigants, And Courts, Katharine Inglis Butler

University of Richmond Law Review

Legislators in jurisdictions with even modest minority populations will find adopting a challenge-resistant redistricting plan to be more difficult than ever before. The problem is how much consideration to give to race. Too little consideration may produce a plan subject to challenge under the Voting Rights Act (the "Act"). Too much consideration may produce a plan subject to challenge on constitutional grounds.


Constitutional And Statutory Challenges To Local At-Large Elections, Timothy G. O'Rourke Jan 1982

Constitutional And Statutory Challenges To Local At-Large Elections, Timothy G. O'Rourke

University of Richmond Law Review

On April 22, 1980, in City of Mobile v. Bolden the United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of at-large elections for the three-member city commission in Mobile, Alabama. In so doing, the Court reversed the judgment of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals that Mobile's at-large plan impermissibly diluted the electoral influence of black voters in violation of the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments to the Constitution. The Supreme Court's decision in Bolden [I] emerged from a sharply divided court. A six-person majority in the case consisted of four justices-Stewart, Burger, Powell, and Rehnquist-who joined in a plurality opinion; Justice …


One Man-One Vote In The Selection Of Presidential Nominating Delegates By State Party Conventions Jan 1971

One Man-One Vote In The Selection Of Presidential Nominating Delegates By State Party Conventions

University of Richmond Law Review

If any conclusion can safely be drawn from the presidential nominating conventions of 1968, it is that the success of potential third party movements looms as a substantial threat to the traditional two party system in the United States. To a large degree, this fact may be attributed to the lack of balanced voter participation inherent in the nominating processes now employed by the two major parties. This lack of participation has engendered a sense of futility in the minds of the individual party members, causing them to limit their support for the slate of candidates their party ultimately chooses.