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Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Law

Leniency, Whistle-Blowing And The Individual: Should We Create Another Race To The Competition Agency?, Maurice E. Stucke Sep 2015

Leniency, Whistle-Blowing And The Individual: Should We Create Another Race To The Competition Agency?, Maurice E. Stucke

Book Chapters

No abstract provided.


Is It Time To Give Up On Antitrust Law For Pro Sports?, Geoffrey Rapp Sep 2015

Is It Time To Give Up On Antitrust Law For Pro Sports?, Geoffrey Rapp

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

Professor Nathaniel Grow has produced a creative, thoroughly researched piece arguing that antitrust has failed in the context of professional sports and calling for the creation of a national-level federal regulatory agency to address anticompetitive conduct by the major leagues. I respond to his diagnosis of antitrust’s failings and to his prescription.


Note: A Series Of (Inseparable) Tubes? “New Media” Streaming And The Impact Of In Re. Pandora Media, Related Decisions, And Performance Licensing In The Internet Era, Ross Coker Sep 2015

Note: A Series Of (Inseparable) Tubes? “New Media” Streaming And The Impact Of In Re. Pandora Media, Related Decisions, And Performance Licensing In The Internet Era, Ross Coker

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

No abstract provided.


Territorial And Customer Restrictions In Franchise Agreements Under The Antitrust Laws, Donald M. Jenkins Aug 2015

Territorial And Customer Restrictions In Franchise Agreements Under The Antitrust Laws, Donald M. Jenkins

Akron Law Review

The growth of franchising as a marketing vehicle in the past decade has been apparent to the American consumer. Several factors have contributed to this growth. This kind of distribution system can be achieved with less capital outlay and in a shorter time span than most other distribution systems require. Some products and services gain greater consumer acceptance if they stand alone in the market place than when they are co-mingled with other products. Wholesalers in certain product lines, such as food and drugs, have found it necessary to form voluntary chains based upon franchise agreements to meet the competition …


Antitrust Common Law: Restrictive Covenants And Reasonableness, Thomas J. Collin Jul 2015

Antitrust Common Law: Restrictive Covenants And Reasonableness, Thomas J. Collin

Akron Law Review

This article will review the ancillary restraint doctrine in Ohio. It will do so by focusing on the three settings in which restrictive covenants are commonly, and most frequently, used and from which the vast majority of the case law has emerged: (1) the sale of a business; (2) leasing; and (3) employment. As the following discussion will show, analysis of ancillary restraints should be uniform even though the subjects of restrictive covenants may differ.


The Evolution And Vitality Of Merger Presumptions: A Decision-Theoretic Approach, Steven C. Salop Jun 2015

The Evolution And Vitality Of Merger Presumptions: A Decision-Theoretic Approach, Steven C. Salop

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This article reviews the formulation and evolution of the Philadelphia National Bank anticompetitive presumption through the lens of decision theory and Bayes Law. It explains how the economic theory, empirical evidence and experience are used to determine a presumption and how that presumption interacts with the reliability of relevant evidence to rationally set the appropriate burden of production and burden of persuasion to rebut the presumption. The article applies this reasoning to merger presumptions. It also sketches out a number of non-market share structural factors that might be used to supplement or replace the current legal and enforcement presumptions for …


Baseball And Antitrust: The Legislative History Of The Curt Flood Act Of 1998, Edmund P. Edmonds, William H. Manz. Jun 2015

Baseball And Antitrust: The Legislative History Of The Curt Flood Act Of 1998, Edmund P. Edmonds, William H. Manz.

Edmund P. Edmonds

No abstract provided.


Deactivating Actavis: The Clash Between The Supreme Court And (Some) Lower Courts, Joshua Davis, Ryan Mcewan May 2015

Deactivating Actavis: The Clash Between The Supreme Court And (Some) Lower Courts, Joshua Davis, Ryan Mcewan

Joshua P. Davis

Numerous trial courts have misinterpreted the Supreme Court’s recent decision in FTC v. Actavis, Inc. An interesting question is why they have done so. Perhaps lower courts disagree with the Supreme Court about so-called “reverse payment” cases, the subject of the Actavis opinion. Or perhaps they simply have made random mistakes, as is perhaps inevitable, particularly in a challenging area of the law like antitrust. This Article suggests an alternative account: that lower courts are seeking clear guidance from Actavis, clear guidance that the Supreme Court has not tended to provide in antitrust cases in general and that it did …


Federal Antitrust Law : A Treatise On The Antitrust Laws Of The United States, Joseph Bauer, Matthew Bender Mar 2015

Federal Antitrust Law : A Treatise On The Antitrust Laws Of The United States, Joseph Bauer, Matthew Bender

Joseph P. Bauer

This master treatise provides a comprehensive analysis of the development and current status of antitrust law, as well as practical guidance for the application of that law. The brevity and generality of the language of relevant acts, combined with the ever-increasing volume of antitrust litigation and varying philosophies of enforcement and interpretation by courts and agencies, makes Federal Antitrust Law indispensable to corporate counsel, government attorneys, and private practitioners specializing in antitrust law. Three volumes focus exclusively on nearly 75 years of Federal Trade Commission work, a subject neglected in other antitrust works. Includes thorough examinations of the FTC Act; …


Políticas Públicas De Fomento A La Competencia, Camilo Ossa Mar 2015

Políticas Públicas De Fomento A La Competencia, Camilo Ossa

Camilo Ossa

In this paper you will find a description related to the constitutional framework that enables the state to intervene in the economy, in order to disaggregate the support on which is built on competition law in Colombia, without neglecting the crucial role economic regulation plays in maintaining the economic and social order, becoming interested more to discover the public policy of the State in this matter, according to the theoretical precepts that teach how the construction and implementation of public policy and the subsequent assessment of the rules of competition law to determine which state, according to the theoretical postulates, …


Trending@Rwu Law: Professor Carl Bogus's Post: When Corporations Grow Too Powerful: Reviving An Old Debate, Carl Bogus Feb 2015

Trending@Rwu Law: Professor Carl Bogus's Post: When Corporations Grow Too Powerful: Reviving An Old Debate, Carl Bogus

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Capturing The Transplant: U.S. Antitrust Law In The European Union, Silvia Beltrametti Jan 2015

Capturing The Transplant: U.S. Antitrust Law In The European Union, Silvia Beltrametti

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

The scholarly literature on the movement of legal norms focuses almost exclusively on transfers from one jurisdiction to another. It largely ignores transfers into new regulatory regimes. Drawing on a case study of the transplantation of U.S. antitrust law into the nascent entity that was to become the European Community, and analyzing its evolution from a public choice perspective, this Article suggests that transfers into new regulatory regimes are more likely to be effective when the lack of established institutions creates opportunities for stakeholders. The endorsement of a new law will enable stakeholders to influence its application and to capture …


The Influence Of The Areeda-Hovenkamp Treatise In The Lower Courts And What It Means For Institutional Reform In Antitrust, Rebecca Haw Allensworth Jan 2015

The Influence Of The Areeda-Hovenkamp Treatise In The Lower Courts And What It Means For Institutional Reform In Antitrust, Rebecca Haw Allensworth

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

It is often pointed out that while the United States Supreme Court is the final arbiter in setting antitrust policy and promulgating antitrust rules, it does so too infrequently to be an efficient regulator. And since the antitrust agencies, the Federal Trade Commission ("FTC") and the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice ("DOJ"), rarely issue guidelines, and even more rarely issue rules or regulations, very little antitrust law is handed down from on high. Instead, circuits split, and lower courts must muddle through new antitrust problems by finding analogies in technologically and socially obsolete precedents. When faced with this …


Antitrust In Zero-Price Markets: Foundations, John M. Newman Jan 2015

Antitrust In Zero-Price Markets: Foundations, John M. Newman

Articles

"Zero-price markets," wherein firms set the price of their goods or services at so, have exploded in quantity and variety. Creative content, software, search functions, social media platforms, mobile applications, travel booking, navigation and mapping systems, and myriad other goods and services are now widely distributed at zero prices. But despite the exponential increase in the volume of zero-price products being consumed, antitrust institutions and analysts have failed to provide an adequate response to markets without prices.

Modern antitrust law is firmly grounded in neoclassical economics, which is in turn centered on price theory. Steeped in price theory, preeminent antitrust …


The E-Books Conspiracy: Crossing The Line Between Applying And Creating Law, Tom Campbell Dec 2014

The E-Books Conspiracy: Crossing The Line Between Applying And Creating Law, Tom Campbell

Tom Campbell

This article responds to John Kirkwood’s Collusion to Control a Powerful Customer: Amazon, E-Books, and Antitrust Policy. Professor Kirkwood argued that in a monopsonistic market (i.e., one where there exists one powerful buyer and many less powerful sellers), or a market in which a buyer has significantly more power than the sellers, collusion on the part of the sellers might be justified, and ought to be a defense to antitrust claims, under certain conditions. This article summarizes Kirkwood’s proposed requirements for invoking this defense and argues that they are overly prescriptive, failing to allow certain instances of beneficial collusion, imposing …