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Full-Text Articles in Law

Law Library Blog (March 2021): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Mar 2021

Law Library Blog (March 2021): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


15th Diversity Symposium Dinner 4-27-2018, Michael M. Bowden Apr 2018

15th Diversity Symposium Dinner 4-27-2018, Michael M. Bowden

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Further Thoughts On Race, American Law, And The State Of Nature: Advancing The Multiracial Paradigm Shift And Seeking Patterns In The Area Of Race And Law, George A. Martinez Jan 2016

Further Thoughts On Race, American Law, And The State Of Nature: Advancing The Multiracial Paradigm Shift And Seeking Patterns In The Area Of Race And Law, George A. Martinez

Faculty Journal Articles and Book Chapters

In his article, the author seeks to use philosophical theory - state of nature theory - as a way to understand American law and issues of race. This project, consistent with a recent trend in legal scholarship, seeks to uncover hidden meanings in law through historical analysis, cultural critique, or philosophical contemplation.

The author argues that there is a tendency for the dominant group to relate to racial minorities as if they were in the state of nature - i.e., a tendency to act as if they were in a situation without legal or moral constraints. The article examines this state of ...


How The Black Lives Matter Movement Can Improve The Justice System, Paul H. Robinson Dec 2015

How The Black Lives Matter Movement Can Improve The Justice System, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This op-ed piece argues that because the criminal justice system's loss of moral credibility contributes to increased criminality and because blacks are disproportionately the victims of crimes, especially violent crimes, the most valuable contribution that the Black Lives Matter movement can make is not to tear down the system’s reputation but rather to propose and support reforms that will build it up, thereby improving its crime-control effectiveness and reducing black victimization.


Trending@Rwu Law: Swapna Yeluri's Post: Baltimore: Ignoring Problems No Longer An Option, Swapna Yeluri May 2015

Trending@Rwu Law: Swapna Yeluri's Post: Baltimore: Ignoring Problems No Longer An Option, Swapna Yeluri

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


From Fugitives To Ferguson: Repairing Historical And Structural Defects In Legally Sanctioned Use Of Deadly Force, José F. Anderson Jan 2015

From Fugitives To Ferguson: Repairing Historical And Structural Defects In Legally Sanctioned Use Of Deadly Force, José F. Anderson

All Faculty Scholarship

The lawful use of lethal force to subdue suspected wrongdoers has a long tradition in our nation. There is certainly nothing wrong with securing, incapacitating, or even killing violent persons who pose a serious threat to the lives of innocent individuals. One of the important roles of government is to protect people from harm and keep the peace. Recent events in Ferguson, Missouri, have highlighted the tension between the officers on the beat and citizens on the street. These tensions are not likely to subside unless there are major structural changes in the way the police do their job and ...


Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It’S Intended To Help, And Why Universities Won’T Admit It (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens Jan 2014

Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It’S Intended To Help, And Why Universities Won’T Admit It (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Mismatch is one of the most important books about law and public policy published recently. The authors, Richard H. Sander and Stuart Taylor, Jr., offer a provocative and deeply researched conclusion: empirical evidence strongly suggests that affirmative action in the admission of African-Americans and Hispanics to selective colleges and law schools is more harmful than helpful.

The problem of underrepresentation of African-Americans and Hispanics in the American legal profession is a continuing problem. But the work of Richard Sander strongly indicates that relying on the power of affirmative action has generated deleterious effects for those this “solution” was designed to ...


The End Of The Pipeline: A Journey Of Recognition For African Americans Entering The Legal Profession [Review Of The Book], La Loria Konata Jan 2014

The End Of The Pipeline: A Journey Of Recognition For African Americans Entering The Legal Profession [Review Of The Book], La Loria Konata

University Library Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Changing Nature Of The Dominant Justifications That Legitimated The Oppression Of African-Americans In The United States, Kevin D. Brown Jan 2013

The Changing Nature Of The Dominant Justifications That Legitimated The Oppression Of African-Americans In The United States, Kevin D. Brown

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The original justifications for the oppression of both African–Americans in the United States and Dalits in India were drawn from the religious systems of thought of both societies. However, over the centuries, the basic justifications for the oppression of African–Americans changed, while the primary rationale for the oppression of Dalits still remains rooted in religion. This essay sketches out the dominant forms that made and continue to make the oppression of African–Americans appear to be part of the natural order of things. It shows how the primary justifications for the oppression of Blacks changed over time. In ...


The Employment And Economic Advancement Of African-Americans In The Twentieth Century, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Ryland Sherman Jan 2013

The Employment And Economic Advancement Of African-Americans In The Twentieth Century, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Ryland Sherman

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In this article we examine the progress of African–Americans in the American labour market over the course of the twentieth century. We trace their progress as African-Americans moved from low-skill low-wage jobs in southern agriculture to a panoply of jobs including high-skill, high-wage jobs in industries and occupations across the country.We also document the migrations and improvements in educational achievement that have made this progress possible. We examine the progress yet to be made and especially the problems of lack of education and incarceration suffered by African–American males. Finally, we examine the importance of anti-discrimination laws and ...


Plus Or Minus One: The Thirteenth And Fourteenth Amendments, Mark A. Graber Jan 2011

Plus Or Minus One: The Thirteenth And Fourteenth Amendments, Mark A. Graber

Faculty Scholarship

The consensus that the Fourteenth Amendment incorporates the Thirteenth Amendment has come under sharp criticism in recent years. Several new works suggest that the Thirteenth Amendment, properly interpreted, protects some substantive rights not protected by the Fourteenth Amendment. Some of this scholarship is undoubtedly motivated by an effort to avoid hostile Supreme Court precedents. Nevertheless, more seems to be going on than mere litigation strategy. Scholars detected different rights and regime principles in the Thirteenth Amendment than they find in the Fourteenth Amendment. The 2011 Maryland Constitutional Law Schoomze, to which this is an introduction, provided an opportunity for law ...


A Critical Legal Rhetoric Approach To In Re African-American Slave Descendants Litigation, Lolita Buckner Inniss Jan 2010

A Critical Legal Rhetoric Approach To In Re African-American Slave Descendants Litigation, Lolita Buckner Inniss

Articles

In this paper I apply critical legal rhetoric to the judicial opinion rendered in response to the Defendants' Motion to Dismiss Plaintiffs' Second Amended and Consolidated Complaint in 'In Re African American Slave Descendants', a case concerning the efforts of a group of modern-day descendants of enslaved African-Americans to obtain redress for the harms of slavery. The chief methodological framework for performing critical legal rhetorical analysis comes from the work of Marouf Hasian, Jr. particularly his schema for analysis which he calls substantive units in critical legal rhetoric. Critical legal rhetoric is a potent tool for exposing the way in ...


The Declining Significance Of Presidential Races?, Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Osamudia R. James Jan 2009

The Declining Significance Of Presidential Races?, Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Osamudia R. James

Articles

No abstract provided.


Demise Of The Talented Tenth: Affirmative Action And The Increasing Underrepresentation Of Ascendant Blacks At Selective Educational Institutions, Kevin D. Brown, Jeannine Bell Jan 2008

Demise Of The Talented Tenth: Affirmative Action And The Increasing Underrepresentation Of Ascendant Blacks At Selective Educational Institutions, Kevin D. Brown, Jeannine Bell

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Over the past 30 years America has experienced both a substantial increase in the percentage of blacks multiracial blacks and an unprecedented influx of voluntary immigration of blacks primarily from Africa and the Caribbean. The percentage of foreign-born black immigrants reached 8% of the black population in 2005, and no doubt is higher today. There is evidence that suggests not only that multiracial blacks and foreign-born black immigrants and their sons and daughters constitute a disproportionate percentage of black students in selective higher education programs, but their percentages are larger than most people realize. This article addresses the resulting change ...


Lessons Learned From Comparing The Application Of Constitutional Law And Anti-Discrimination Law To African Americans In The U.S. And Dalits In India In The Context Of Higher Education, Kevin D. Brown, Vinay Sitapati Jan 2008

Lessons Learned From Comparing The Application Of Constitutional Law And Anti-Discrimination Law To African Americans In The U.S. And Dalits In India In The Context Of Higher Education, Kevin D. Brown, Vinay Sitapati

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In this Article the authors will compare the development of constitutional law and federal anti-discrimination law in the context of higher education of African-Americans in the U.S. and Dalits in India. Both groups suffer from oppression and discrimination based upon a hereditary trait and related to their integration into mainstream society; neither group is completely isolated from the majority population responsible for the discrimination; and African-Americans and Dalits approximate similar percentages of their country's population. Based upon the 2000 census, African-Americans constitute 12.7% of the American populations, and, according to the 1991 Census Report of India, Dalits ...


Symposium: Race Across Boundaries: Introduction, Kevin D. Brown Jan 2008

Symposium: Race Across Boundaries: Introduction, Kevin D. Brown

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Deadly Waiting Game: An Environmental Justice Framework For Examining Natural And Man-Made Disasters Beyond Hurricane Katrina [Abstract], Robert D. Bullard Mar 2007

Deadly Waiting Game: An Environmental Justice Framework For Examining Natural And Man-Made Disasters Beyond Hurricane Katrina [Abstract], Robert D. Bullard

The Climate of Environmental Justice: Taking Stock (March 16-17)

Presenter: Robert D. Bullard, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology, Clark Atlanta University

1 page.


Coalitions And Collective Memories: A Search For Common Ground, Ediberto Román Jan 2007

Coalitions And Collective Memories: A Search For Common Ground, Ediberto Román

Faculty Publications

The following pages explore this contemporary debate, and ultimately sides in favor of inter-minority group coalitions, as they may be effective democratic vehicles towards social change. Part II examines the argument in favor of inter-minority group coalitions. Part III addresses the challenges to those positions, including the arguments posed by leading skeptics. Finally, Part IV rejects the cynicism associated with coalitions and proposes a concrete point of commonality that may help forge much needed common ground for many racial and ethnic outsider groups.


The Citizenship Dialectic, Ediberto Román Jan 2006

The Citizenship Dialectic, Ediberto Román

Faculty Publications

Imagine that you reside in a country not unlike the United States, with a similar cultural, economic, racial and ethnic mix. As in many other countries, the events of September 11, 2001, dramatically changed the lives of the inhabitants of your land. Your country passed a series of Special Laws specifically designed to enhance national security, and has joined the United States in its efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Your country's law enforcement and military officials, in several high-profile arrests that captured the attention of the populace, took three suspects into custody who allegedly were involved in terrorist-related activities ...


Brown And The Contemporary Brazilian Struggle Against Racial Inequality: Some Preliminary Comparative Thoughts, Robert J. Cottrol Jan 2004

Brown And The Contemporary Brazilian Struggle Against Racial Inequality: Some Preliminary Comparative Thoughts, Robert J. Cottrol

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court's celebrated 1954 decision that ended segregation in the United States, did not end a caste based inequality among the races. One of the nations currently struggling with such a legacy of discrimination is Brazil. Brazil's path to overcome structural inequality has some interesting parallels and differences with the American experience.

Writings by Brazilian legal scholars such as Joaquim B. Barbosa Gomes and Hedio Silva Jr. had bolstered the thought that the American civil rights experience has lessons for Brazil. This experience, which was greatly shaped by Brown, contributed to the ...


Brown And The Contemporary Brazilian Struggle Against Racial Inequality: Some Preliminary Comparative Thoughts, Robert J. Cottrol Jan 2004

Brown And The Contemporary Brazilian Struggle Against Racial Inequality: Some Preliminary Comparative Thoughts, Robert J. Cottrol

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court's celebrated 1954 decision that ended segregation in the United States, did not end a caste based inequality among the races. One of the nations currently struggling with such a legacy of discrimination is Brazil. Brazil's path to overcome structural inequality has some interesting parallels and differences with the American experience.
Writings by Brazilian legal scholars such as Joaquim B. Barbosa Gomes and Hedio Silva Jr. had bolstered the thought that the American civil rights experience has lessons for Brazil. This experience, which was greatly shaped by Brown, contributed to the ...


African-Americans Within The Context Of International Oppression, Kevin D. Brown Jan 2003

African-Americans Within The Context Of International Oppression, Kevin D. Brown

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Reexamination Of The Benefit Of Publicly Funded Private Education For African-American Students In A Post-Desegregation Era, Kevin D. Brown Jan 2003

Reexamination Of The Benefit Of Publicly Funded Private Education For African-American Students In A Post-Desegregation Era, Kevin D. Brown

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


A Vote Cast; A Vote Counted: Quantifying Voting Rights Through Proportional Representation In Congressional Elections, Michael Mccann Jan 2002

A Vote Cast; A Vote Counted: Quantifying Voting Rights Through Proportional Representation In Congressional Elections, Michael Mccann

Law Faculty Scholarship

The current winner-take-all or first-past-the-post system of voting promotes an inefficient market where votes are often wasted. In this system, representatives are selected from a single district in which the candidate with the plurality of votes gains victory. Candidates who appear non-generic can rarely, if ever, expect to receive the most votes in this system. This phenomenon is especially apparent when African-Americans and other minority groups seek elected office. In part because white voters constitute at least a plurality of voters in every state except Hawaii, minorities in the forty-nine other states have had historically little success in gaining election ...


Foreword: The Legal History Of The Great Sit-In Case Of Bell V. Maryland, William L. Reynolds Jan 2002

Foreword: The Legal History Of The Great Sit-In Case Of Bell V. Maryland, William L. Reynolds

Faculty Scholarship

Reviews the environment and history of the 1960 Baltimore sit-in case that eventually made its way to the United States Supreme Court.


How Democratic Are Initiatives?, Richard B. Collins Jan 2001

How Democratic Are Initiatives?, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.


Making Blacks Foreigners: The Legal Construction Of Former Slaves In Post-Revolutionary Massachusetts, Kunal Parker Jan 2001

Making Blacks Foreigners: The Legal Construction Of Former Slaves In Post-Revolutionary Massachusetts, Kunal Parker

Articles

No abstract provided.


True Reparations, W. Burlette Carter Jan 2000

True Reparations, W. Burlette Carter

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Part of a George Washington University symposium on race and law, this article is a response to Professor Anthony Cook’s symposium contribution on reparations. According to this writer, Professor Cook argues that only public atonement supported by economic restitution will provide reconciliation between whites and blacks. The article interprets the three steps Professor Cook puts forth to heal the wounds between blacks and whites as confession, restoration and reconciliation. While the article does not dismiss the idea of reparations, and even offers legal support for it from the fields of Torts and Trusts and Estates, it argues that reparations-seeking ...


Sharing Space: Why Racial Goodwill Isn't Enough, Sharon E. Rush Oct 1999

Sharing Space: Why Racial Goodwill Isn't Enough, Sharon E. Rush

UF Law Faculty Publications

Racism is understood by most White people to be an attitude of prejudice toward Blacks. In contrast, Blacks define racism more inclusively; it is a system of institutional preferences for Whites, resulting from historically ingrained prejudices Whites have against Blacks. People of goodwill are disinclined to attribute racial connotations to ordinary, everyday negative interactions involving Whites and people of color as long as the Whites are people of goodwill (people who do not think they have prejudiced attitudes). Second, goodwill comfort is important to maintain, causing many Whites to shy away from any discussions about race. People of goodwill have ...


African-Americans, Latinos, And The Construction Of Race: Toward An Epistemic Coalition, George A. Martinez Jan 1998

African-Americans, Latinos, And The Construction Of Race: Toward An Epistemic Coalition, George A. Martinez

Faculty Journal Articles and Book Chapters

Latinos will soon become the largest minority group in the United States. African-Americans may therefore be about to give up political clout to Latinos. This prospect has generated tension between African-Americans and Latinos. Given this background, it is important for Critical Race Theory and Latino Critical Theory to consider the matter of the African-American/Latino relationship. With this in mind, the author discusses two important questions posed by the organizers of this panel: (1) How is the relationship between African-Americans and Latinos affected by the construction of race? and (2) Can Critical Race Theory benefit by a consideration of the ...