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Full-Text Articles in Law

Law School News: Dean's Distinguished Service Award 2021: Ralph Tavares 05/28/2021, Michael M. Bowden May 2021

Law School News: Dean's Distinguished Service Award 2021: Ralph Tavares 05/28/2021, Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Building An Antiracist Law School: Inclusivity In Admissions And Retention Of Diverse Students—Leadership Determines Dei Success, Danielle M. Conway, Bekah Saidman-Krauss, Rebecca Schreiber Jan 2021

Building An Antiracist Law School: Inclusivity In Admissions And Retention Of Diverse Students—Leadership Determines Dei Success, Danielle M. Conway, Bekah Saidman-Krauss, Rebecca Schreiber

Faculty Scholarly Works

Penn State Dickinson Law has been leading with an Antiracist admissions philosophy and corresponding plans for implementation before the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020. Arguably, this approach to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI)was not identified explicitly as a vision priority for the law school until July 2019, when Dickinson Law welcomed Danielle M. Conway as the first Black Dean and first woman Dean in the law school’s 186-year history. Dean Conway outlined four vision priorities to accomplish within her first five years at Dickinson Law. Vision priority number two calls upon the law school’s administrators to move the ...


Access Law Schools & Diversifying The Profession, Deseriee A. Kennedy Jan 2020

Access Law Schools & Diversifying The Profession, Deseriee A. Kennedy

Scholarly Works

Lawyers do not reflect the racial diversity in the United States. The legal profession continues to struggle with ways to achieve and maintain racial diversity. Law schools play a critical role in the path to practice, and therefore an examination of the barriers to the profession they created is warranted. This essay critiques the over-reliance on standardized testing in law school admissions and advocates for an open admissions process that prioritizes racial and academic diversity. It suggests that the benefits of minimizing the role of standardized tests far outweigh any perceived costs in legal education. This essay concludes that the ...


Law Library Blog (November 2019): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Nov 2019

Law Library Blog (November 2019): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


The 16th Annual Diversity Symposium Dinner, April 4, 2019, Roger Williams University School Of Law Apr 2019

The 16th Annual Diversity Symposium Dinner, April 4, 2019, Roger Williams University School Of Law

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Trending @ Rwu Law: Dean Yelnosky's Post: 24: Dean Style 3-6-2017, Michael Yelnosky Mar 2017

Trending @ Rwu Law: Dean Yelnosky's Post: 24: Dean Style 3-6-2017, Michael Yelnosky

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Testing, Diversity, And Merit: A Reply To Dan Subotnik And Others, Andrea A. Curcio, Carol L. Chomsky, Eileen Kaufman Nov 2015

Testing, Diversity, And Merit: A Reply To Dan Subotnik And Others, Andrea A. Curcio, Carol L. Chomsky, Eileen Kaufman

Andrea A. Curcio

The false dichotomy between achieving diversity and rewarding merit frequently surfaces in discussions about decisions on university and law school admissions, scholarships, law licenses, jobs, and promotions. “Merit” judgments are often based on the results of standardized tests meant to predict who has the best chance to succeed if given the opportunity to do so. This Article criticizes over-reliance on standardized tests and responds to suggestions that challenging the use of such tests reflects a race-comes-first approach that chooses diversity over merit. Discussing the firefighter exam the led to the Supreme Court decision in Ricci v. DiStefano, as well as ...


Testing, Diversity, And Merit: A Reply To Dan Subotnik And Others, Andrea A. Curcio, Carol L. Chomsky, Eileen Kaufman Dec 2014

Testing, Diversity, And Merit: A Reply To Dan Subotnik And Others, Andrea A. Curcio, Carol L. Chomsky, Eileen Kaufman

Andrea A. Curcio

The false dichotomy between achieving diversity and rewarding merit frequently surfaces in discussions about decisions on university and law school admissions, scholarships, law licenses, jobs, and promotions. “Merit” judgments are often based on the results of standardized tests meant to predict who has the best chance to succeed if given the opportunity to do so. This Article criticizes over-reliance on standardized tests and responds to suggestions that challenging the use of such tests reflects a race-comes-first approach that chooses diversity over merit. Discussing the firefighter exam the led to the Supreme Court decision in Ricci v. DiStefano, as well as ...


Testing, Diversity, And Merit: A Reply To Dan Subotnik And Others, Andrea A. Curcio, Carol L. Chomsky, Eileen Kaufman Dec 2014

Testing, Diversity, And Merit: A Reply To Dan Subotnik And Others, Andrea A. Curcio, Carol L. Chomsky, Eileen Kaufman

University of Massachusetts Law Review

The false dichotomy between achieving diversity and rewarding merit frequently surfaces in discussions about decisions on university and law school admissions, scholarships, law licenses, jobs, and promotions. “Merit” judgments are often based on the results of standardized tests meant to predict who has the best chance to succeed if given the opportunity to do so. This Article criticizes over-reliance on standardized tests and responds to suggestions that challenging the use of such tests reflects a race-comes-first approach that chooses diversity over merit. Discussing the firefighter exam the led to the Supreme Court decision in Ricci v. DiStefano, as well as ...


Making Law School A Place For People Who Know What They Want To Do Nov 2014

Making Law School A Place For People Who Know What They Want To Do

Austen Parrish (2014-)

No abstract provided.


Taking The Bar Early: Making Law Students ‘Practice Ready’, Jason Forcier Feb 2013

Taking The Bar Early: Making Law Students ‘Practice Ready’, Jason Forcier

Jason Forcier

The beginning of 2013 brings with it a number of rule changes by the Supreme Court of Arizona. Notable is the change to Rule 34, Application for Admission. The rule change is the result of an initiative from the deans of each of the three law schools: Phoenix School of Law, University of Arizona, and Arizona State University. The experimental change, set to expire at the end of 2015, allows law students to take the February bar exam during their final semester, so long as students meet certain qualifications and are within 120 days of graduation. This change effectively allows ...


Making “Practice Ready” Practice Ready: Arizona’S Attempt To Streamline The Final Process For Admission To The Bar, Jason Forcier Feb 2013

Making “Practice Ready” Practice Ready: Arizona’S Attempt To Streamline The Final Process For Admission To The Bar, Jason Forcier

Jason Forcier

Beginning with the first of the year, 2013 brings with it a number of rule changes from the Supreme Court of Arizona. Most notably is the change to Rule 34, Application for Admission. The rule change is the result of an initiative from each of the deans of Arizona’s three law schools: Phoenix School of Law, University of Arizona, and Arizona State University. The new change will provide many beneficial results: it will allow students to start transitioning from the theory of law to the practice of law; lead to a fundamental change in the structure of the current ...


Reforming Legal Education To Prepare Law Students Optimally For Real-World Practice, John M. Lande Jan 2013

Reforming Legal Education To Prepare Law Students Optimally For Real-World Practice, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

This article synthesizes major points in the October 2012 symposium of the University of Missouri School of Law Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution, entitled "Overcoming Barriers in Preparing Law Students for Real-World Practice." There is a growing consensus that American law schools need to do a better job of preparing students to practice law. Teaching students to think like a lawyer is still necessary but it is not sufficient for students to act like a lawyer soon after they graduate.


The Student-Friendly Model: Creating Cost-Effective Externship Programs, James H. Bachman, Jana B. Eliason Nov 2012

The Student-Friendly Model: Creating Cost-Effective Externship Programs, James H. Bachman, Jana B. Eliason

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


"Your Honor What I Meant To State Was . . .": A Comparative Analysis Of The Judicial And Evidentiary Admission Doctrines As Applied To Counsel Statements In Pleadings, Open Court, And Memoranda Of Law, Ediberto Roman Nov 2012

"Your Honor What I Meant To State Was . . .": A Comparative Analysis Of The Judicial And Evidentiary Admission Doctrines As Applied To Counsel Statements In Pleadings, Open Court, And Memoranda Of Law, Ediberto Roman

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Real Impact Of Eliminating Affirmative Action In American Law Schools: An Empirical Critique Of Richard Sander's Study, David L. Chambers, Timothy T. Clydesdale, William C. Kidder, Richard O. Lempert Jan 2005

The Real Impact Of Eliminating Affirmative Action In American Law Schools: An Empirical Critique Of Richard Sander's Study, David L. Chambers, Timothy T. Clydesdale, William C. Kidder, Richard O. Lempert

Articles

In 1970, there were about 4000 African American lawyers in the United States. Today there are more than 40,000. The great majority of the 40,000 have attended schools that were once nearly all-white, and most were the beneficiaries of affirmative action in their admission to law school. American law schools and the American bar can justly take pride in the achievements of affirmative action: the training of tens of thousands of African American (as well as Latino, Asian American, and Native American) practitioners, community leaders, judges, and law professors; the integration of the American bar; the services that ...


Myths And Facts About Affirmative Action, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams Jan 2001

Myths And Facts About Affirmative Action, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams

Articles

The case against affirmative action in admissions to institutions of higher education is based on the moral attractiveness of colorblind decision making and buttressed by a sense that such programs are not just unfair but pointless. Their intended beneficiaries, the argument goes, are put in situations in which they are unable to compete with whites and not only perform poorly but are destructively demoralized in the process. Common to arguments against affirmative action in admissions is a belief that minorities advantaged by it displace whites who are more deserving of admission because they have accomplished more, can better benefit from ...


Michigan's Minority Graduates In Practice: Answers To Methodological Queries, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams Jan 2000

Michigan's Minority Graduates In Practice: Answers To Methodological Queries, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams

Articles

Before making a few remarks in response to those who commented on our article (Lempert, Chambers, and Adams 2000), we would like to express our gratitude to the editors of Law and Social Inquiry for securing these commentaries and to the people who wrote them. The comments both highlight the potential uses to which our research and similar studies may be put and give us the opportunity to address methodological concerns and questions that other readers of our article may share with those who commented on it. The responses to our work are of two types. Professors Nelson, Payne, and ...


Michigan's Minority Graduates In Practice: The River Runs Through Law School, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams Jan 2000

Michigan's Minority Graduates In Practice: The River Runs Through Law School, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams

Articles

This paper reports the results of a 1997-98 survey designed to explore the careers of the University of Michigan Law School's minority graduates from the classes of 1970 through 1996, and of a random sample of Michigan Law School's white alumni who graduated during the same years. It is to date the most detailed quantitative exploration of how minority students fare after they graduate from law school and enter law practice or related careers. The results reveal that almost all of Michigan Law School's minority graduates pass a bar exam and go on to have careers that ...


Doing Well And Doing Good: The Careers Of Minority And White Graduates Of The University Of Michigan Law School, David L. Chambers, Richard O. Lempert, Terry K. Adams Jan 1999

Doing Well And Doing Good: The Careers Of Minority And White Graduates Of The University Of Michigan Law School, David L. Chambers, Richard O. Lempert, Terry K. Adams

Articles

Of the more than 1,000 law students attending the University of Michigan Law School in the spring of 1965, only one was African American. The Law School faculty, in response, decided to develop a program to attract more African American students. One element of this program was the authorization of a deliberately race-conscious admissiosn process. By the mid-1970s, at least 25 African American students were represented in each graduating class. By the late 1970s, Latino and Native American students were included in the program as well. Over the nearly three decades between 1970 and 1998, the admissions efforts and ...


A Message From The Dean, Alfred C. Aman Jr. Apr 1997

A Message From The Dean, Alfred C. Aman Jr.

Alfred Aman Jr. (1991-2002)

No abstract provided.


Law School Expects Record Applications, June Lyle Mar 1989

Law School Expects Record Applications, June Lyle

Bryant Garth (1986-1987 Acting; 1987-1990)

No abstract provided.


Number Of Law School Applications Rises Again, Bryan E. Denham Sep 1988

Number Of Law School Applications Rises Again, Bryan E. Denham

Bryant Garth (1986-1987 Acting; 1987-1990)

No abstract provided.


A First Year Appraisal; Thoughts On Bakke, Sheldon J. Plager Jul 1978

A First Year Appraisal; Thoughts On Bakke, Sheldon J. Plager

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


Dean Provides Some Answers, S. Jay Plager Apr 1978

Dean Provides Some Answers, S. Jay Plager

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

A number of student groups had expressed a need for an open meeting with Dean Plager. On February 6, 1978, the Dean spoke with a group of about 150 students at a meeting arranged and conduct.ed by the Women's Caucus and SAC. With Dean Plager's permission, the meeting was taped recorded. Herewith is a condensed and edited transcript of the Dean's remarks:


Pressure To Enter Law School Intense, Bill Pittman Jan 1975

Pressure To Enter Law School Intense, Bill Pittman

Douglass Boshkoff (1971-1972 Acting; 1972-1975)

No abstract provided.


A Message From The Dean, Douglass G. Boshkoff Jan 1975

A Message From The Dean, Douglass G. Boshkoff

Douglass Boshkoff (1971-1972 Acting; 1972-1975)

No abstract provided.


Admissions Plan Measure Hit Jan 1973

Admissions Plan Measure Hit

Douglass Boshkoff (1971-1972 Acting; 1972-1975)

No abstract provided.