Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Cognitive Psychology Of Circumstantial Evidence, Kevin Jon Heller Nov 2006

The Cognitive Psychology Of Circumstantial Evidence, Kevin Jon Heller

Michigan Law Review

Empirical research indicates that jurors routinely undervalue circumstantial evidence (DNA, fingerprints, and the like) and overvalue direct evidence (eyewitness identifications and confessions) when making verdict choices, even though false-conviction statistics indicate that the former is normally more probative and more reliable than the latter The traditional explanation of this paradox, based on the probability-threshold model of jury decision-making, is that jurors simply do not understand circumstantial evidence and thus routinely underestimate its effect on the objective probability of the defendant's guilt. That may be true in some situations, but it fails to account for what is known in cognitive psychology …


Verdict According To Conscience: Perspectives On The English Criminal Trial Jury 1200-1800, Thomas A. Green Jan 1985

Verdict According To Conscience: Perspectives On The English Criminal Trial Jury 1200-1800, Thomas A. Green

Books

This book treats the history of the English criminal trial jury from its origins to the eve of the Victorian reforms in the criminal law. It consists of eight free-standing essays on important aspects of that history and a conclusion. Each chapter addresses the phenomenon that has come to be known as "jury nullification," the exercise of jury discretion in favor of a defendant whom the jury nonetheless believes to have committed the act with which he is charged. Historically, some instances of nullification reflect the jury's view that the act in question is not unlawful, while in other cases …


Societal Concepts Of Criminal Liability For Homicide In Medieval England, Thomas A. Green Jan 1972

Societal Concepts Of Criminal Liability For Homicide In Medieval England, Thomas A. Green

Articles

THE early history of English criminal law lies hidden behind the laconic formulas of the rolls and law books. The rules of the law, as expounded by the judges, have been the subject of many studies; but their practical application in the courts, where the jury of the community was the final and unbridled arbiter, remains a mystery: in short, we know little of the social mores regarding crime and crimi- nals. This study represents an attempt to delineate one major aspect of these societal attitudes. Its thesis is that from late Anglo-Saxon times to the end of the middle …


Report On Prosecution, Rollin M. Perkins Nov 1931

Report On Prosecution, Rollin M. Perkins

Michigan Law Review

The logical starting point was the discovery and restatement of existing knowledge and information on these subjects, and because of the tremendous mass of material which has appeared in the form of surveys and reports within the last decade and a half, it was deemed wise to enlist the services of an expert in such matters. The analysis which he has produced, let it be added, amply justifies the Commission in his selection.


Crimes--Burden Of Proving Alibi And Self-Defense May 1931

Crimes--Burden Of Proving Alibi And Self-Defense

Michigan Law Review

The defendant, indicted for murder, requested a charge that, if the evidence as to self-defense raised in the minds of the jurors a reasonable doubt of the guilt of the defendant, they should acquit him. Held, the trial court properly refused to· give the instruction. The burden was on the defendant to establish the defense by a preponderance of the evidence. Commonwealth v. Troup (Pa. 1931) 153 Atl. 337.


Constitutional Law-Crimes-Waiver Of Jury Dec 1930

Constitutional Law-Crimes-Waiver Of Jury

Michigan Law Review

The accused, on trial for a felony, was permitted by the trial judge to waive a jury. The trial before the judge alone resulted in an acquittal. The state's attorney petitioned for a writ of mandamus to expunge from the record the orders to dispose of the cause without a jury and for discharge of the accused, on the ground that the court had no jurisdiction to hear and determine the cause. Held, writ of mandamus denied. People ex rel. Swanson v. Fisher (Ill., 1930) 172 N.E. 722.


Crimes-Alibi-Instructions As To Particular Evidence Mar 1929

Crimes-Alibi-Instructions As To Particular Evidence

Michigan Law Review

In a prosecution for robbery the defendants introduced evidence as to an alibi and requested a charge which contained the proposition that the evidence on this point had merely to raise a reasonable doubt as to their presence at the scene of the crime to entitle them to an acquittal. The court refused this request, but had previously instructed the jury that the burden rested with the state to prove the guilt of the. defendants beyond a reasonable doubt. Held, that it was reversible error to refuse the charge requested. People v. Vasquez (Cal. App. r928) 26g Pac. 549.