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Abolitionist

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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Law

Black Women's Suffrage, The Nineteenth Amendment, And The Duality Of A Movement, Danielle M. Conway Jan 2021

Black Women's Suffrage, The Nineteenth Amendment, And The Duality Of A Movement, Danielle M. Conway

Faculty Scholarly Works

America is at an unprecedented time with self-determination for Black women, and this phase of the movement is reverberating throughout this nation and around the world. There is no confusion for those who identify as Black women that this movement is perpetual, dating back to the enslavement of Black people in America by act and by law. One need only look to the intersecting crises of 2020 to discern the reality of Black women’s—and by extension the Black community and by further extension individuals and groups marginalized, subordinated, and oppressed by white patriarchy—perpetual struggle for civil and human rights.

To …


Remembering An Abolitionist, Ambassador John R. Miller (May 23, 1938-October 4, 2017), Eleanor Kennelly Gaetan, Donna M. Hughes Oct 2017

Remembering An Abolitionist, Ambassador John R. Miller (May 23, 1938-October 4, 2017), Eleanor Kennelly Gaetan, Donna M. Hughes

Dignity: A Journal of Analysis of Exploitation and Violence

A memorial for Ambassador-at-Large to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, John R. Miller (May 23, 1938-October 4, 2017). Ambassador Miller believed modern-day slavery, encompassing sex trafficking and forced labor, requires a principled global offensive that the United States is morally obligated to lead. In the four formative years he led the State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, 2002 to 2006, John Miller set the office’s course as diplomatically aggressive and programmatically creative. He made the annual Trafficking in Persons report more than a bureaucratic submission, putting daring heroes at the center, and insisting on compelling …


Southern Free Women Of Color In The Antebellum North: Race, Class, And A "New Women's Legal History", Bernie D. Jones Jun 2015

Southern Free Women Of Color In The Antebellum North: Race, Class, And A "New Women's Legal History", Bernie D. Jones

Akron Law Review

This article develops Welke’s theme and proposes that in the field of legal history, the analyses can not be limited to “race, gender, or class,” but that matrices of race, gender, and class must be considered at their intersections, “race, and gender, and class,” where they might shed light on the significance of shifting legal modalities. It explores how race, gender, and class as legal policy in the 19th century could be crucial for the formation of family and marital relationships in the private sphere. The focus here is upon free women of color living in the antebellum North who …


Has The "Machinery Of Death" Become A Clunker?, Stephen F. Smith Mar 2015

Has The "Machinery Of Death" Become A Clunker?, Stephen F. Smith

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


John Mclean: Moderate Abolitionist And Supreme Court Politician, Paul Finkelman Mar 2009

John Mclean: Moderate Abolitionist And Supreme Court Politician, Paul Finkelman

Vanderbilt Law Review

His thirty-two years on the Supreme Court make him one of the twelve longest serving Justices in history. At the time of his death, he was the third longest serving Justice in the history of the Court, and he is sixth in length of service among all Justices who served before the twentieth century. He wrote about 240 majority opinions and about sixty separate concurring and dissenting opinions. Yet he is about as obscure a Justice as there has ever been. Few Justices have worked so hard for such a long period of time, and yet had so little impact …


Revisiting Beccaria's Vision: The Enlightenment, America's Death Penalty, And The Abolition Movement, John D. Bessler Jan 2009

Revisiting Beccaria's Vision: The Enlightenment, America's Death Penalty, And The Abolition Movement, John D. Bessler

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

In 1764, Cesare Beccaria, a 26-year-old Italian, penned . The treatise argued that state-sanctioned executions and torture violate natural law. As we near the 250th anniversary of its publication, author John D. Bessler provides a comprehensive review of the abolition movement, from before Beccaria's time to the present. Bessler reviews Beccaria's influence on Enlightenment thinkers and more importantly, on America's Founding Fathers. The Article also provides an extensive review of Eighth Amendment jurisprudence and then contrasts it with the trend in International Law towards the abolition of the death penalty. It then discusses the current state of the death penalty …


The Trial Of John Brown: A Commentary, Douglas O. Linder Jan 2007

The Trial Of John Brown: A Commentary, Douglas O. Linder

Faculty Works

The arrest, trial, and execution of John Brown in the fall of 1859 came at a critical moment in United State history. According to historian David S. Reynolds in his biography, "John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights" (2005), Brown's actions and statements following his failed attempt to begin a slave insurrection near Harper's Ferry, Virginia so polarized northern and southern opinion on the slavery issue as to ensure Abraham Lincoln's election and cause the Civil War to occur perhaps two decades earlier than it might have otherwise. Reynolds is quick …


The Amistad Case, Douglas O. Linder Jan 2007

The Amistad Case, Douglas O. Linder

Faculty Works

The improbable voyage of the schooner Amistad and the court proceedings and diplomatic maneuverings that resulted from that voyage form one of the most significant stories of the nineteenth century. When Steven Spielberg chose the Amistad case as the subject of his 1997 feature film, he finally brought it the attention the case had long deserved, but never received. The Amistad case energized the fledgling abolitionist movement and intensified conflict over slavery, prompted a former President to go before the Supreme Court and condemn the policies of a present Administration, soured diplomatic relations between the United States and Spain for …


A Tale Of Two Lawyers In Antebellum Cincinnati: Timothy Walker's Last Conversation With Salmon P. Chase, Gordon A. Christenson Jan 2002

A Tale Of Two Lawyers In Antebellum Cincinnati: Timothy Walker's Last Conversation With Salmon P. Chase, Gordon A. Christenson

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

Timothy Walker's reputation today is slower to recover the same national stature he achieved while living. He was close to the founding generation, yet believed in law reform and codification to see an end of slavery and stave off chaos from the crowd and popular democracy. For a time, he was a "man of his age" in Cincinnati, where in word and deed he projected the civic republicanism of the founders into a future for the new democrats. There is no public memorial for Walker, though the obelisk monument rises in Spring Grove Cemetery and his bust is displayed prominently …


The Lawyer As Abolitionist: Ending Homelessness And Poverty In Our Time, Florence Wagman Roisman Jan 2000

The Lawyer As Abolitionist: Ending Homelessness And Poverty In Our Time, Florence Wagman Roisman

Saint Louis University Public Law Review

No abstract provided.


On Abolitionist Critiques, “Homeless Service” Programs, And Pragmatic Change, Lucie White Jan 2000

On Abolitionist Critiques, “Homeless Service” Programs, And Pragmatic Change, Lucie White

Saint Louis University Public Law Review

No abstract provided.


Stamped With Glory: Lewis Tappan And The Africans Of The Amistad, Douglas O. Linder Jan 2000

Stamped With Glory: Lewis Tappan And The Africans Of The Amistad, Douglas O. Linder

Faculty Works

Abolitionism came relatively late to Lewis Tappan. Devotional, benevolent and hardworking are all words that describe Tappan in his twenties and thirties. Social reformer he was not. In 1818, Tappan abandoned the Calvinism of his mother for Unitarianism, then fashionable for a socially ambitious merchant. For the next eight years, Tappan enjoyed the typical life of an upper-middle-class New England merchant. He took his new faith seriously, however, editing a Unitarian journal, and becoming the first treasurer of the American Unitarian Association. In the mid-1820's, America experienced The Great Second Awakening, a widespread revival of religion and religious debate and …


The Antislavery And Abolitionist Background Of John A. Bingham, Richard L. Aynes Jan 1988

The Antislavery And Abolitionist Background Of John A. Bingham, Richard L. Aynes

The 39th Congress Project

No abstract provided.


The Fourteenth Amendment Reconsidered, The Segregation Question, Alfred H. Kelly Jun 1956

The Fourteenth Amendment Reconsidered, The Segregation Question, Alfred H. Kelly

Michigan Law Review

Some sixty years ago in Plessy v. Ferguson the Supreme Court of the United States adopted the now celebrated "separate but equal" doctrine as a constitutional guidepost for state segregation statutes. Justice Brown's opinion declared that state statutes imposing racial segregation did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment, provided only that the statute in question guaranteed equal facilities for the two races. Brown's argument rested on a historical theory of the intent, although he offered no evidence to support it. "The object of the amendment," he said, "was undoubtedly to enforce the absolute equality of the two races before the law, …