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2022

NCAA

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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

The First Step: Student-Athletes Finally Get The Right To Be Compensated For Their Names, Images, And Likenesses, Joseph Ranieri Sep 2022

The First Step: Student-Athletes Finally Get The Right To Be Compensated For Their Names, Images, And Likenesses, Joseph Ranieri

DePaul Journal of Sports Law

No abstract provided.


Electronic Arts’ College Videogames In The Name, Image, And Likeness Era, Ryan A. Buchanan Aug 2022

Electronic Arts’ College Videogames In The Name, Image, And Likeness Era, Ryan A. Buchanan

UNH Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


Playing For Keeps: The Need For Name, Image, And Likeness Legislation To Ensure Representation For College Athletes, Campbell Flaherty Aug 2022

Playing For Keeps: The Need For Name, Image, And Likeness Legislation To Ensure Representation For College Athletes, Campbell Flaherty

UNH Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Concept Of Amateurism: How The Term Became Part Of The College Sport Vernacular, Robert J. Romano Esq. Aug 2022

The Concept Of Amateurism: How The Term Became Part Of The College Sport Vernacular, Robert J. Romano Esq.

UNH Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


Personal Foul: The Exploitation Of Ncaa Student-Athletes’ Publicity Rights, Jordan Pamlanye Jul 2022

Personal Foul: The Exploitation Of Ncaa Student-Athletes’ Publicity Rights, Jordan Pamlanye

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

In 2017, Donald De La Haye, a Division I football player for the University of Central Florida of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”), was deemed ineligible for NCAA participation due to his successful YouTube channel, “Deestroying.” De La Haye was a kicker for the University of Central Florida’s (“UCF”) football team. At the time, his YouTube channel had over 90,000 subscribers and almost 5,000,000 views. The NCAA found De La Haye ineligible because he was compensated for videos that included aspects of his life as an NCAA athlete—a violation of the NCAA bylaws.

The consequences of this decision …


Game Of Thrones: Liberty & Eminent Domain, Mitchell F. Crusto Jun 2022

Game Of Thrones: Liberty & Eminent Domain, Mitchell F. Crusto

University of Miami Law Review

This Article analyzes the relationship between private property and the government’s power to expropriate it. When it comes to protecting private property from governmental expropriation, our Constitution is conflicted. On the one hand, the right to private property is a foundational principle that defines the American spirit, our history, and our culture. Yet, on the other hand, the Founders adopted the government’s superior authority over private property, that is, eminent domain, for public purpose and with just compensation, via the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. This “private property conundrum” requires us to explore the limits of eminent domain relative …


The Ncaa's Rise To Absolute Power And Confronting Its Distortion Of Amateurism, Terek J. Kirsch May 2022

The Ncaa's Rise To Absolute Power And Confronting Its Distortion Of Amateurism, Terek J. Kirsch

Senior Honors Projects, 2020-current

This paper examines the progression of the intercollegiate athletic space, from a small regatta in 1852 to the massive athletic environment we know now in contemporary society. It finds the National Collegiate Athletic Association snared in a trap of circular logic that has been closing in on it since its conception, as it has defined collegiate athletes as amateurs and then proceeded to argue for amateur status for those athletes because of the definition that it wrote. This paper concludes in its final two chapters, after analyzing the recent Supreme Court case NCAA v. Alston, and the Name, Image, and …


The Dawn Of A New Era: Antitrust Law Vs. The Antiquated Ncaa Compensation Model Perpetuating Racial Injustice, Amanda L. Jones Mar 2022

The Dawn Of A New Era: Antitrust Law Vs. The Antiquated Ncaa Compensation Model Perpetuating Racial Injustice, Amanda L. Jones

Northwestern University Law Review

Two crises in 2020 fueled the fire underlying a debate that has been smoldering for years: whether student athletes should be compensated. The COVID-19 pandemic coincided with the Black Lives Matter movement and drew unprecedented attention to systemic racism permeating society, including college sports that rely disproportionately on Black men risking physical harm to support an entire industry. The Supreme Court’s decision in NCAA v. Alston opened the door for some athletic conferences to offer student athletes unlimited education-related benefits and called out the NCAA’s business model that relies on not paying student athletes under the justification of amateurism. Alston …


Using The Internal Revenue Code To Limit Coaching Salaries: A Proposal To Bring Amateurism Back Into College Football, Blaire Mikesell Jan 2022

Using The Internal Revenue Code To Limit Coaching Salaries: A Proposal To Bring Amateurism Back Into College Football, Blaire Mikesell

Indiana Law Journal

Since formal collegiate athletic competitions began in 1852, they have gained popularity and become a mainstay in American culture. This rise in popularity coupled with increased media coverage allowed college athletics, and particularly college football, to grow into a successful business that generates billions of dollars in revenue each year. Colleges and institutions earn this athletic revenue as tax-free income due to their tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code § 501(c)(3) tax-exemption statute. The basic policy underlying this statute is as follows: colleges and universities provide an important benefit to the public by providing education, and in exchange for …


Blood, Sweat, Tears: A Re-Examination Of The Exploitation Of College Athletes, Keely Grey Fresh Jan 2022

Blood, Sweat, Tears: A Re-Examination Of The Exploitation Of College Athletes, Keely Grey Fresh

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

2021 Louise Halper Award Winner for Best Student Note

The unrest revolving around compensation for college athletes is not a new concept. However, public attitudes are shifting. With spirited arguments on both sides, and the recent Supreme Court decision of National Collegiate Athletic Association v. Alston regarding antitrust exemptions, the issue has been placed in a spotlight. This Note examines the buildup of discontentment through the history of the NCAA and amateurism, specifically how the term “student-athlete” became coined. It will then move to litigation efforts by athletes in an attempt to gain employment status, and an alternative route of …


There’S No “Gender” In Team: Developing State Policies For The Inclusion Of The Transgender Interscholastic Athlete, Brianna Weppler Jan 2022

There’S No “Gender” In Team: Developing State Policies For The Inclusion Of The Transgender Interscholastic Athlete, Brianna Weppler

Touro Law Review

The transgender athlete is a relatively new concept challenging the norm of gender division in sports. Multiple states across the United States have yet to update their policies to include the transgender athlete in interscholastic athletics. State policies that do include transgender student athletes are currently being challenged on the grounds that they violate Title IX of the Educational Amendments to the 1964 Civil Rights Act. This review considers the different state policies dictating the inclusion of transgender student athletes in school sports. After evaluating the impact of omitting transgender students from participating on sports teams, this review maintains that …


The Ethics Of Sign Stealing In College Football, Joshua D. Winneker, Ian Silfies Jan 2022

The Ethics Of Sign Stealing In College Football, Joshua D. Winneker, Ian Silfies

Marquette Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


Assessing Amateurism In College Sports, Casey E. Faucon Jan 2022

Assessing Amateurism In College Sports, Casey E. Faucon

Washington and Lee Law Review

College sports generate approximately $8 billion each year for the National C[artel] Athletic Association and its member institutions. Most of this revenue flows from lucrative television broadcasting deals, which often incorporate the right to commercialize and sell the names, images, and likenesses of college athletes. Under its current revenue scheme, student-athletes—85 percent of whom live below the poverty line—receive a share of zero. For over a century, we’ve justified this exploitative distribution scheme under a cloak of student-athlete “amateurism.” Antitrust challenges to the NCAA’s amateurism rules clash with the assumption that “amateurism” is a revered tradition and an important tenet …


Improving Gender Equity Through The Controlling Authority Of The Ncaa, Lauren Mccoy Coffey Jan 2022

Improving Gender Equity Through The Controlling Authority Of The Ncaa, Lauren Mccoy Coffey

Marquette Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


Title Ix Hypocrisy Continues After Ncaa V. Alston, Maci Edwards, Walter Champion Jan 2022

Title Ix Hypocrisy Continues After Ncaa V. Alston, Maci Edwards, Walter Champion

Marquette Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Miser’S Rule Of Reason: The Supreme Court And Antitrust Limits On Student Athlete Compensation, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Jan 2022

A Miser’S Rule Of Reason: The Supreme Court And Antitrust Limits On Student Athlete Compensation, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

All Faculty Scholarship

The unanimous Supreme Court decision in NCAA v. Alston is its most important probe of antitrust’s rule of reason in decades. The decision implicates several issues, including the role of antitrust in labor markets, how antitrust applies to institutions that have an educational mission as well as involvement in a large commercial enterprise, and how much leeway district courts should have in creating decrees that contemplate ongoing administration.

The Court accepted what has come to be the accepted framework: the plaintiff must make out a prima facie case of competitive harm. Then the burden shifts to the defendant to produce …