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Statutory Adoption Of The Objective Test For Entrapment As A Solution To Dubious Tactics In Federal Terrorism Investigations, Philip M. Gibson May 2022

Statutory Adoption Of The Objective Test For Entrapment As A Solution To Dubious Tactics In Federal Terrorism Investigations, Philip M. Gibson

Lincoln Memorial University Law Review Archive

Federal investigators and their informants frequently utilize questionable tactics which resemble entrapment in terrorism investigations. Despite the use of such tactics, entrapment has universally failed as an affirmative defense in federal terrorism cases. This is largely as a result of the subjective test for entrapment employed in federal courts which does not allow for a finding of entrapment if the defendant is found to be predisposed to commit the particular offense. This is especially damning for defendants in terrorism cases as they are frequently proponents of fringe political and religious ideologies or mentally ill which easily establishes predisposition for a …


History Repeating Itself: The Resurgence Of The Taliban And The Abandonment Of Afghan Women, Hannah Bogaert Mar 2022

History Repeating Itself: The Resurgence Of The Taliban And The Abandonment Of Afghan Women, Hannah Bogaert

Immigration and Human Rights Law Review

For two decades the United States and its allies fought against the Taliban in Afghanistan. After the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in late 2021, the Taliban has once again claimed the power of the country. The Taliban has already begun to implement restrictions that deny Afghan women their human rights. This article will outline the Taliban’s disregard for the International Bill of Human Rights, analyzing the Taliban’s observance of human rights before the U.S. invasion in 2001, post- U.S. withdrawal expressions by the Taliban in 2021, and post-U.S. withdrawal actions in 2021. Finally, this article will analyze different actions available …


The Use And Abuse Of Domestic National Security Detention, Nicole Hallett Jan 2022

The Use And Abuse Of Domestic National Security Detention, Nicole Hallett

Seattle University Law Review

Are people convicted of terrorism-related offenses so dangerous that we must bend the Constitution to keep the public safe? Or should we treat them like people who commit other crimes—by prosecuting, convicting, sentencing, and then releasing them after they have served their criminal sentences? Can we trust the government to use the power to detain people without criminal charge without abusing it? The case of Adham Amin Hassoun raises these questions. Prosecuted after 9/11 for providing support to Muslims abroad in the 1990s, and sentenced under the United States’ expansive material support laws, Hassoun avoided a life sentence only to …


What War Did To The Academy, What The Academy Did To War: A 20-Year Retrospective On The Effects Of The Post-9/11 Wars, Deborah Pearlstein Jan 2022

What War Did To The Academy, What The Academy Did To War: A 20-Year Retrospective On The Effects Of The Post-9/11 Wars, Deborah Pearlstein

Faculty Articles

The history of the legal academy’s impact on the way states fight wars is hardly one of unmixed glory. It was a law professor moonlighting for President Lincoln who authored “Instructions for the Government of Armies of the United States in the Field” during the Civil War, a code still recognized worldwide today for having laid critical groundwork for the modern law of war. It was likewise a law professor whose work came to serve as both theoretical and practical justification for the sweeping powers of the Nazi state. So it should perhaps be unsurprising that, two decades of engagement …


The Emergency Next Time, Noa Ben-Asher Jan 2022

The Emergency Next Time, Noa Ben-Asher

Faculty Publications

This Article offers a new conceptual framework to understand the connection between law and violence in emergencies. It is by now well-established that governments often commit state violence in times of national security crisis by implementing excessive emergency measures. The Article calls this type of legal violence “Emergency-Affirming Violence.” But Emergency Violence can also be committed through governmental non-action. This type of violence, which this Article calls, “Emergency-Denying Violence,” has manifested in the crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Article offers a taxonomy to better understand the phenomenon of Emergency Violence. Using 9/11 and COVID-19 as examples, the Article proposes …