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2021

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Full-Text Articles in Law

City Of Los Angeles V. Lyons: How Supreme Court Jurisprudence Of The Past Puts A Chokehold On Constitutional Rights In The Present, Peter C. Douglas Oct 2021

City Of Los Angeles V. Lyons: How Supreme Court Jurisprudence Of The Past Puts A Chokehold On Constitutional Rights In The Present, Peter C. Douglas

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

The United States today has refocused its attention on its continuing struggles with civil rights and police violence—struggles that have always been present but which come to the forefront of the collective consciousness at inflection points like the current one. George Floyd—and uncounted others—die at the hands of the police, and there is, justifiably, outrage and a search for answers. Although the reasons why Black and Brown people are disproportionally subject to unconstitutional police violence are manifold, one reason lies in the Supreme Court’s 1983 decision in City of Los Angeles v. Lyons. While many scholars have criticized the Burger …


Removing Police From Schools Using State Law Heightened Scrutiny, Christina Payne-Tsoupros Oct 2021

Removing Police From Schools Using State Law Heightened Scrutiny, Christina Payne-Tsoupros

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

This Article argues that school police, often called school resource officers, interfere with the state law right to education and proposes using the constitutional right to education under state law as a mechanism to remove police from schools.

Disparities in school discipline for Black and brown children are well-known. After discussing the legal structures of school policing, this Article uses the Disability Critical Race Theory (DisCrit) theoretical framework developed by Subini Annamma, David Connor, and Beth Ferri to explain why police are unacceptable in schools. Operating under the premise that school police are unacceptable, this Article then analyzes mechanisms to …


The Religion Of Race: The Supreme Court As Priests Of Racial Politics, Audra Savage Oct 2021

The Religion Of Race: The Supreme Court As Priests Of Racial Politics, Audra Savage

Utah Law Review

The tumultuous summer of 2020 opened the eyes of many Americans, leading to a general consensus on one issue—racism still exists. This Article offers a new descriptive account of America’s history that can contextualize the zeitgeist of racial politics. It argues that the Founding Fathers created a national civil religion based on racism when they compromised on the issue of slavery in the creation of the Constitution. This religion, called the Religion of Race, is built on a belief system where whiteness is sacred and Blackness is profane. The sacred text is the Constitution, and it is interpreted by the …


Introduction: Assuming A Critical Lens In Legal Studies: Reconciling Laws And Reality, Tanya Monique Washington Hicks, Courtney Anderson Sep 2021

Introduction: Assuming A Critical Lens In Legal Studies: Reconciling Laws And Reality, Tanya Monique Washington Hicks, Courtney Anderson

Georgia State University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Caste Discrimination And Federal Employment Law In The United States, Brian Elzweig Sep 2021

Caste Discrimination And Federal Employment Law In The United States, Brian Elzweig

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Discretion And Disparity In Federal Detention, Stephanie Holmes Didwania Mar 2021

Discretion And Disparity In Federal Detention, Stephanie Holmes Didwania

Northwestern University Law Review

The uniquely American phenomenon of mass incarceration plagues the pretrial space. People awaiting trial make up roughly 20% of those held in criminal custody in the United States. Largely overlooked by bail-reform advocates, pretrial detention in the federal criminal system presents a puzzle. The federal system detains defendants at a much higher rate than the states—more than 60% of U.S. citizen-defendants were detained pending trial by federal courts last year. But federal defendants virtually never fail to appear in court, and they are rarely arrested for new crimes while on pretrial release. And unlike state court systems, cash bail is …


Welcome To The New Dignity, Donna M. Hughes Feb 2021

Welcome To The New Dignity, Donna M. Hughes

Dignity: A Journal of Analysis of Exploitation and Violence

No abstract provided.


Dear Courts: I, Too, Am A Reasonable Man, Marvel L. Faulkner Feb 2021

Dear Courts: I, Too, Am A Reasonable Man, Marvel L. Faulkner

Pepperdine Law Review

There has been an ongoing debate regarding police-on-Black violence since the dawn of the United States police force. At every stage, the criminal justice system has had a monumental impact on the plight of the Black American community. The historical roots of racism within the criminal justice system have had adverse effects on the Black American psyche. Emerging research suggests that the upsurge in reporting police-on-Black violence—including videos shot from pedestrian camera phones and uploaded to multimedia platforms and historical accounts of the agonizing treatment Black Americans have experienced beginning with Slave Patrols—has affected individualized behavior during interactions with police …


Do Mandatory Minimums Increase Racial Disparities In Federal Criminal Sentencing?, Caroline Gillette Feb 2021

Do Mandatory Minimums Increase Racial Disparities In Federal Criminal Sentencing?, Caroline Gillette

Undergraduate Economic Review

Black males received sentences about twenty percent longer than similarly situated white males from 2012 to 2016. Some of this inequality may be introduced by mandatory minimum sentences. Charges carrying a mandatory minimum sentence are brought against Black defendants at higher rates than white defendants. It has been argued that these sentences introduce bias in two ways: legislatively (the types of crimes that carry a mandatory minimum) and in the way these sentences are put into practice (increasing prosecutorial discretion). This brief explores whether mandatory minimum sentences increase racial inequality in criminal sentencing.


The Disdain Of Heavenly Religions Between The Islamic Law And The United Arab Emirates Law, Layla Salem Feb 2021

The Disdain Of Heavenly Religions Between The Islamic Law And The United Arab Emirates Law, Layla Salem

UAEU Law Journal

The principle of criminalizing the contempt of religions takes a high position among the general principles that prevail in the legal system of any state to guarantee that all individuals in the society can live in harmony and agreement regardless of the differences that may stem from culture, religion or race. In agreement with this trend, the UAE legislator issued Law No. (2) in 2015 for preventing discrimination and hatred which requires the criminalization of acts associated with the contempt of religions and their holy sites and the fight against all forms of discrimination and rejection of hatred speech in …


Table Of Contents Jan 2021

Table Of Contents

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


Masthead Jan 2021

Masthead

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


Hair Goes Nothing: Proposing The Uniform Enactment Of The Crown Act Across The United States, Alexandra Halbert Jan 2021

Hair Goes Nothing: Proposing The Uniform Enactment Of The Crown Act Across The United States, Alexandra Halbert

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


An Analysis Of Domestic And Foreign Legal Mechanisms To Counter The Rise Of White Nationalism, John C. Jankosky Ii Jan 2021

An Analysis Of Domestic And Foreign Legal Mechanisms To Counter The Rise Of White Nationalism, John C. Jankosky Ii

American University National Security Law Brief

No abstract provided.


Foreword, Cindy Chau Jan 2021

Foreword, Cindy Chau

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


Going Beyond Rule 8.4(G): A Shift To Active And Conscious Efforts To Dismantle Bias, Meredith R. Miller Jan 2021

Going Beyond Rule 8.4(G): A Shift To Active And Conscious Efforts To Dismantle Bias, Meredith R. Miller

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


Correction Of Monumental Judicial Malpractice: The Case For Clearing Secessionist And Slaveholding Symbols Of "Justice" From The Courthouse, Michael J. Pastrick Esq. Jan 2021

Correction Of Monumental Judicial Malpractice: The Case For Clearing Secessionist And Slaveholding Symbols Of "Justice" From The Courthouse, Michael J. Pastrick Esq.

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


The New Federalism Frontier In Marijuana Legalization And Decriminalization, Oliver Roberts Jan 2021

The New Federalism Frontier In Marijuana Legalization And Decriminalization, Oliver Roberts

South Carolina Law Review

No abstract provided.


This Is Minnesota: An Analysis Of Disparities In Black Student Enrollment At The University Of Minnesota Law School And The Effects Of Systemic Barriers To Black Representation In The Law, Maleah Riley-Brown, Samia Osman, Justice C. Shannon, Yemaya Hanna, Brandie Burress, Tony Sanchez, Joshua Cottle Jan 2021

This Is Minnesota: An Analysis Of Disparities In Black Student Enrollment At The University Of Minnesota Law School And The Effects Of Systemic Barriers To Black Representation In The Law, Maleah Riley-Brown, Samia Osman, Justice C. Shannon, Yemaya Hanna, Brandie Burress, Tony Sanchez, Joshua Cottle

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Entrenched Racial Hierarchy: Educational Inequality From The Cradle To The Lsat, Kevin Woodson Jan 2021

Entrenched Racial Hierarchy: Educational Inequality From The Cradle To The Lsat, Kevin Woodson

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Redefining Healthcare To Address Racial Health Disparities & Inequities, Abdur Rahman Amin Jan 2021

Redefining Healthcare To Address Racial Health Disparities & Inequities, Abdur Rahman Amin

Mitchell Hamline Law Journal of Public Policy and Practice

No abstract provided.


The Constitutional Tort System, Noah Smith-Drelich Jan 2021

The Constitutional Tort System, Noah Smith-Drelich

Indiana Law Journal

Constitutional torts—private lawsuits for constitutional wrongdoing—are the primary means by which violations of the U.S. Constitution are vindicated and deterred. Through damage awards, and occasionally injunctive relief, victims of constitutional violations discourage future misconduct while obtaining redress. However, the collection of laws that governs these actions is a complete muddle, lacking any sort of coherent structure or unifying theory. The result is too much and too little constitutional litigation, generating calls for reform from across the political spectrum along with reverberations that reach from Standing Rock to Flint to Ferguson.

This Article constructs a framework of the constitutional tort system, …


The $2 Billion-Plus Price Of Injustice: A Methodological Map For Police Reform In The George Floyd Era, David Schultz Jan 2021

The $2 Billion-Plus Price Of Injustice: A Methodological Map For Police Reform In The George Floyd Era, David Schultz

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Wisconsin's Race-Based Mascot Law: An Update, Jeremy Daniel Heacox Jan 2021

Wisconsin's Race-Based Mascot Law: An Update, Jeremy Daniel Heacox

Marquette Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


Educational Adequacy Challenges: The Impact On Minnesota Charter Schools, Wendy Baudoin Jan 2021

Educational Adequacy Challenges: The Impact On Minnesota Charter Schools, Wendy Baudoin

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Seven (At Least) Lessons Of The Myon Burrell Case, Leslie E. Redmond, Mark Osler Jan 2021

The Seven (At Least) Lessons Of The Myon Burrell Case, Leslie E. Redmond, Mark Osler

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


How Increased Legal Representation Can Close The Gap In Special Education Discrepancies, Todd Carney Jan 2021

How Increased Legal Representation Can Close The Gap In Special Education Discrepancies, Todd Carney

Touro Law Review

This piece looks at how the existing education regime has led to disparities between white and minority students. The paper finds that the disparity gets even worse when special education is factored in. The reason so many low-income and minority students with disabilities receive such a poor education is that they do not have the proper legal representation to demand the rights that they are guaran- teed under US law. This paper looks at how low-income and minority families have been cheated out of proper legal representation in other areas and how receiving the necessary legal representation can lead to …


The Deliberate Indifference Standard: A Broken Promise To Protect And Serve The Mentally Ill, Katherine R. Carroll Jan 2021

The Deliberate Indifference Standard: A Broken Promise To Protect And Serve The Mentally Ill, Katherine R. Carroll

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Toward Racially Equitable And Accountable Tech, Andrea Giampetro-Meyer, Janae James, Sydney Brooke Jan 2021

Toward Racially Equitable And Accountable Tech, Andrea Giampetro-Meyer, Janae James, Sydney Brooke

Marquette Law Review

This Article examines three distinct areas to consider how we might move

toward racially equitable and accountable tech. The three distinct areas are:

(1) fair housing, (2) surveillance, and (3) social media. Fair housing raises

questions about where today’s racially biased algorithms fit within the context

of historical, racist government housing policy. Surveillance raises questions

about how some tech tools render Black faces invisible, while others render

Black faces dangerously conspicuous. Social media highlights the clash

between civil rights and civil liberties, especially when racial justice conflicts

with freedom of speech. Our analysis leads us to consider the extent to …


Not Your Mule? Disrupting The Political Powerlessness Of Black Women Voters, Chinyere Ezie Jan 2021

Not Your Mule? Disrupting The Political Powerlessness Of Black Women Voters, Chinyere Ezie

University of Colorado Law Review

On the one hundredth anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment, this Article reflects on the legacy of Black women voters. The Article hypothesizes that even though suffrage was hard fought, it has not been a vehicle for Black women to meaningfully advance their political concerns. Instead, an inverse relationship exists between Black women's political participation and their relative level of socioeconomic and political well-being. Taking recent national elections as a case study, the Article identifies two sources of Black women's political powerlessness: "caretaker voting" and the "trapped constituency problem." The Article concludes that Black women's strong voter turnout coupled with their …