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2017

Consumers

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Law Library Blog (December 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Dec 2017

Law Library Blog (December 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Consumer Class Actions: Who Are The Real Winners?, Edward F. Sherman Nov 2017

Consumer Class Actions: Who Are The Real Winners?, Edward F. Sherman

Maine Law Review

The class action is one of the most controversial procedural devices in the American legal system. In the years since an expanded class action rule was adopted in 1966, class actions have grown in scope and number, and suits by consumers have accounted for an increasing share of class actions suits. By allowing individuals to sue not only for themselves, but also on behalf of others similarly situated, the class action “empowers plaintiffs to bring cases that otherwise either would not be possible or would only be possible in a very different form.” Business critics see this as enabling “lawyers …


Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Nov 2017

Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Do We Need Help Using Yelp? Regulating Advertising On Mediated Reputation Systems, David Adam Friedman Nov 2017

Do We Need Help Using Yelp? Regulating Advertising On Mediated Reputation Systems, David Adam Friedman

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Yelp, Angie’s List, Avvo, and similar entities enable consumers to access an incredibly useful trove of information about peer experiences with businesses and their goods and services. These “mediated reputation systems,” gatherers and disseminators of consumer peer opinions, are more trusted by consumers than traditional commercial channels. They are omnipresent, carried everywhere on mobile devices, and used by consumers ready to transact.

Though this information is valuable, a troubling conflict emerges in its presentation. Most of these reputation platforms rely heavily on advertising sales to support their business models. This reliance compels these entities to display persuasive advertising right along …


Further Reflections On Antitrust And Wealth Inequality, Daniel A. Crane Oct 2017

Further Reflections On Antitrust And Wealth Inequality, Daniel A. Crane

Articles

Since I have already published a lengthy academic article on antitrust and wealth inequality, I have the freedom of using this piece to present the key arguments unvarnished by dense citations or technical details (readers interested in those things should consult my earlier article) and to respond to some of the criticisms of my article that have since been levied. My thesis, before and now, is this: claims that antitrust enforcement advances income or wealth progressivity are overstated and rest on simplistic and unrealistic understandings of how antitrust actually operates. While some enforcement actions may generate progressive results, others will …


Empowering Consumers Through Online Dispute Resolution, Amy J. Schmitz Oct 2017

Empowering Consumers Through Online Dispute Resolution, Amy J. Schmitz

Faculty Publications

We transact online every day, hoping that no problems will occur. However, our purchases are not always perfect: goods may not arrive; products may be faulty; expectations may go unmet. When this occurs, we are often left frustrated, with no means for seeking redress. Phone calls to customer service are generally unappealing and ineffective, and traditional face-to-face or judicial processes for asserting claims are impractical after weighing costs against likely recovery. This is especially true when seeking redress requires travel, or for crossborder claims involving jurisdictional complexities. This situation has created a need for online dispute resolution (“ODR”), which brings …


Covering The Care: Cost Sharing Reductions In Nh, Jo Porter, Lucy C. Hodder Jun 2017

Covering The Care: Cost Sharing Reductions In Nh, Jo Porter, Lucy C. Hodder

Law Faculty Scholarship

This brief uses national data to describe the NH population who received Cost Sharing Reductions for coverage on the NH Marketplace.


The New Handshake: Where We Are Now, Amy J. Schmitz, Colin Rule Jun 2017

The New Handshake: Where We Are Now, Amy J. Schmitz, Colin Rule

Faculty Publications

The internet has empowered consumers in new and exciting ways. It has opened more efficient avenues for consumers to buy just about anything. Want proof? Just pull out your smartphone, swipe your finger across the screen a few times, and presto – your collector’s edition Notorious RBG bobblehead is on its way from China. Unfortunately, however, the internet has not yet delivered on its promise to improve consumer protection.


The Cfpb Proposed Arbitration Ban, The Rule, The Data, And Some Considerations For Change, Ramona L. Lampley May 2017

The Cfpb Proposed Arbitration Ban, The Rule, The Data, And Some Considerations For Change, Ramona L. Lampley

Faculty Articles

Predispute consumer arbitration has sparked energetic debate and sharply divides the utility of the class action versus the utility of individual arbitration. Thus far, the U.S. Supreme Court’s jurisprudence has given a “thumbs up” approach to predispute consumer arbitration waivers, which almost always include a class waiver agreement. Congress showed little interest in amending the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”), even for consumer cases. It seems that consumer arbitration was the “wild west” of the law, in that it was largely unregulated and could direct claims to the black hole of private dispute resolution. In May 2016, the Consumer Financial Protection …


Agricultural And Food Law—Food Labeling And Biotechnology—The Food Fight Over Labeling Genetically Engineered Foods And A Natural Solution To Protect Agricultural Biotechnology In The Natural State, Katie W. Branscum Apr 2017

Agricultural And Food Law—Food Labeling And Biotechnology—The Food Fight Over Labeling Genetically Engineered Foods And A Natural Solution To Protect Agricultural Biotechnology In The Natural State, Katie W. Branscum

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


La Responsabilisation De L'Economie: What The United States Can Learn From The New French Law On Consumer Overindebtedness, Jason J. Kilborn Jan 2017

La Responsabilisation De L'Economie: What The United States Can Learn From The New French Law On Consumer Overindebtedness, Jason J. Kilborn

Jason Kilborn

This Article on the French law continues a study of European consumer debt-relief systems, which the author began previously in an article on the German system. With rapid legal and practical developments in consumer debt-relief law, Europe provides an excellent comparative legal laboratory for observing the potential benefits and pitfalls of consumer bankruptcy reforms. In particular, French and German experiences with long-term payment plans shed useful light on the great debate raging in the United States over similar plans.


Avoiding Sticker Shock: Legislative Approaches To Protect Consumers From Surprise Medical Bills, Merlow M. Dunham Jan 2017

Avoiding Sticker Shock: Legislative Approaches To Protect Consumers From Surprise Medical Bills, Merlow M. Dunham

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

Consumers are increasingly receiving surprise medical bills, where an insured patient is unexpectedly billed directly for medical services received at an in-network health care facility from an out-of-network provider. These situations often arise in emergency rooms, operating rooms, and delivery rooms, despite the efforts of patients to receive care only from in-network providers. Surprise medical bills commonly leave consumers on the hook for thousands of dollars for out-of-network services that they had no opportunity to refuse. This article explores how the steady rise of narrow provider network health plans and the often-corresponding lack of transparency regarding which providers are included …


Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform And Consumer Protection Act: The Evolution Of Whistleblower Protections, Employment Contracts And Mandatory Arbitration Agreements, Florence Shu-Acquaye Jan 2017

Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform And Consumer Protection Act: The Evolution Of Whistleblower Protections, Employment Contracts And Mandatory Arbitration Agreements, Florence Shu-Acquaye

Faculty Scholarship

On July 21, 2010, in response to the financial abuses that occurred during from 2007 to 2009. president Barack Obama signed into law the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act ("Dodd-Frank Act").


Labor And The Origins Of Civil Procedure, Luke P. Norris Jan 2017

Labor And The Origins Of Civil Procedure, Luke P. Norris

Law Faculty Publications

A series of changes within civil procedure over the past few decades—including the rise of private arbitration, the accompanying decline of public adjudication, and the erection of barriers to class actions—have diminished the economic power of workers, consumers, and diffuse economic actors. This Article demonstrates that avoiding these economic consequences was a central goal of those who crafted American federal civil procedure in the first place. Driven to action by the procedural issues involved in labor injunction cases, leading procedural reformers behind the modern regime strove to make American federal civil procedure sensitive to questions of political economy and designed …


Slanting Trademark Choices In The Right Direction: Why Section 2(A) Of The Lanham Act Promotes The Interests Of Consumers, Zachary Kasnetz Jan 2017

Slanting Trademark Choices In The Right Direction: Why Section 2(A) Of The Lanham Act Promotes The Interests Of Consumers, Zachary Kasnetz

Missouri Law Review

Part II discusses the case’s factual and procedural background. Part III provides background on the relevant aspects of federal trademark law governing registration and the constitutional doctrines relevant to the instant decision. Part IV lays out the court’s decision and its reasoning. Finally, Part V critiques the majority’s analysis, particularly its application of the doctrine of unconstitutional conditions. It then argues that, under the legal doctrines relied upon by the majority, section 2(a) of the Lanham Act is constitutional.


Mandatory Arbitration In Consumer Finance And Investor Contracts, Michael S. Barr Jan 2017

Mandatory Arbitration In Consumer Finance And Investor Contracts, Michael S. Barr

Book Chapters

This chapter focuses on the use of mandatory pre-dispute arbitration clauses in a subset of consumer contracts – those involving consumer finance and investor products and services. Arbitration clauses are pervasive in financial contracts – for credit cards, bank accounts, auto loans, broker-dealer services, and many others. In the wake of the recent financial crisis, Congress enacted the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (Dodd-Frank). Dodd-Frank authorises the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to prohibit or condition the use of arbitration clauses in consumer finance and investment contracts, …


Fetishizing Copies, Jessica Litman Jan 2017

Fetishizing Copies, Jessica Litman

Book Chapters

Our copyright laws encourage authors to create new works and communicate them to the public, because we hope that people will read the books, listen to the music, see the art, watch the films, run the software, and build and inhabit the buildings. That is the way that copyright promotes the Progress of Science. Recently, that not-very-controversial principle has collided with copyright owners’ conviction that they should be able to control, or at least collect royalties from, all uses of their works. A particularly ill-considered manifestation of this conviction is what I have decided to call copy-fetish. This is the …


Who's Driving You? Driver Data Remains Unprotected Under Coppa And Shine The Light, Marisa Tashman Jan 2017

Who's Driving You? Driver Data Remains Unprotected Under Coppa And Shine The Light, Marisa Tashman

Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review

As our lives become more driven by technology, California’s privacy laws fall short of protecting our personally identifiable information. Vehicles in particular present an increasing privacy concern, as our automobiles become more computer and less car. Cars today have increasingly sophisticated capabilities, stemming from connected technology and sensors, and their ability to capture geolocation and biometric data. This data can be used to make inferences about drivers’ behavioral patterns and daily habits. This Article analyzes whether California’s privacy laws—California Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”) and Shine the Light—adequately address privacy concerns regarding driver data collected by the connected car. This …


Why Intra-Brand Dealer Competition Is Irrelevant To The Price Effects Of Tesla's Vertical Integration, Daniel A. Crane Jan 2017

Why Intra-Brand Dealer Competition Is Irrelevant To The Price Effects Of Tesla's Vertical Integration, Daniel A. Crane

Articles

"In recent years, Tesla Motors (recently renamed Tesla) has been engaged in a state-by-state ground way for the right to distribute it’s all-electric vehicles directly to consumers. The car dealers' lobby, with the political backing of General Motors, has fiercely battled back, relying on decades-old state dealer protection laws to argue that Tesla is legally bound to distribute through franchised dealers. Through a combination of favorable state legislative and judicial decisions, Tesla has won the right to distribute directly in many states, but remains categorically barred from direct distribution in important states like Michigan and Texas--and hence all direct distribution …