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2016

University of Richmond

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Articles 1 - 30 of 256

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Skeleton Of A Data Breach: The Ethical And Legal Concerns, Hilary G. Buttrick, Jason Davidson, Richard J. Mcgowan Dec 2016

The Skeleton Of A Data Breach: The Ethical And Legal Concerns, Hilary G. Buttrick, Jason Davidson, Richard J. Mcgowan

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

After over thirty data breaches spanning the third and fourth quarter of 2012, Forbes magazine labeled the summer of 2012 as “The Summer of the Data Breach.” Four years later, businesses across multiple industries have suffered brand-image damage and paid millions of dollars in remedial expenses; we are living in the era of the mega breach. In 2014, companies such as Target, Home Depot, JP Morgan Chase, Anthem, Sony, UPS, Jimmy John’s, Kmart, Neiman Marcus, Community Health Systems, and the White House suffered data breaches. The Home Depot breach alone resulted in the loss of “56 million credit card accounts,” …


Co-Developing Drugs With Indigenous Communities: Lessons From Peruvian Law And The Ayahuasca Patent Dispute, Daniel S. Sem Dec 2016

Co-Developing Drugs With Indigenous Communities: Lessons From Peruvian Law And The Ayahuasca Patent Dispute, Daniel S. Sem

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

This paper will examine the issues surrounding the codevelopment of drugs derived from traditional medicines used by indigenous peoples in Amazonia, with a focus on Peru. In particular, this paper will explore what national, regional and international legal structures are in place to protect the interests of indigenous peoples, while at the same time providing medical benefit to the world. This issue is explored in the context of Peruvian, U.S., and international treaties – especially the TRIPS agreement, the Andean Community, sui generis protections, and the US-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement.


Physicalism And Patent Theory, Christopher A. Cotropia Nov 2016

Physicalism And Patent Theory, Christopher A. Cotropia

Law Faculty Publications

United States patent law’s view on the need for a physical embodiment of the invention, and the continued production and use of an embodiment, has varied over the last two centuries. In the early days, the requirement for “physicalism” was high, with the inventor being required to actually reduce the invention to practice prior to patenting, and enforceability was tied to “working” the claimed invention. By the early 1900s, these requirements of physicalism disappeared. This changing view on physicalism speaks volumes as to which major patent theory the law emphasizes, with physicalism supporting the incentive to invent theory and the …


E-Museletter: November 2016, Kathleen Klepfer Nov 2016

E-Museletter: November 2016, Kathleen Klepfer

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Criminal Law And Procedure, Aaron J. Campbell Nov 2016

Criminal Law And Procedure, Aaron J. Campbell

Law Student Publications

This article surveys recent decisions of Virginia appellate courts in the field of criminal law and procedure. The article also outlines some of the most significant changes to criminal law and procedure enacted by the 2016 Virginia General Assembly.


The Will To Prevail: Inside The Legal Battle To Save Sweet Briar, James M. Giudice, J. Westwood Smithers Iii Nov 2016

The Will To Prevail: Inside The Legal Battle To Save Sweet Briar, James M. Giudice, J. Westwood Smithers Iii

Law Student Publications

Despite the school‘s storied past and deep historical roots, on March 3, 2015, the Sweet Briar Board of Directors announced its intention to shut down the college—permanently—the following summer. The Board cited "insurmountable financial challenges," including falling enrollment, a lack of unrestricted funds in its endowment, and the century-old school‘s lack of appeal to modern generations of students. The Board claimed the school was no longer financially viable, because though its $84 million endowment was sizeable by most measures, the school needed an endowment three times that size to stay open. Students, faculty, staff, and alumnae were blindsided by the …


Family Law, Allison Anna Tait Nov 2016

Family Law, Allison Anna Tait

Law Faculty Publications

In the past year, Virginia courts have addressed a range of family law questions—new and old—that reflect the changing landscape of families and marriage. Questions related to same-sex marriage and divorce have begun to appear on Virginia court dockets, including an important case the Supreme Court of Virginia decided this year with respect to same-sex couples cohabiting and the termination of spousal support. Family law courts also saw shifts in gender norms—wives paying spousal support to their husbands and fathers being awarded physical custody of their children. These legal questions tested the limits of statutory language and helped to expand …


The Dormant Commerce Clause As A Limit On Personal Jurisdiction, John F. Preis Nov 2016

The Dormant Commerce Clause As A Limit On Personal Jurisdiction, John F. Preis

Law Faculty Publications

For over 70 years, the Due Process Clause has defined the law of personal jurisdiction. This makes sense, because being forced to stand trial in a far-off state will sometimes be fundamentally unfair. What does not make sense, however, is the Dormant Commerce Clause’s apparent irrelevance to personal jurisdiction. The Dormant Commerce Clause addresses state laws affecting interstate commerce, and a plaintiff’s choice of forum is often a commercially driven choice between different state courts. So why isn’t the Dormant Commerce Clause part of personal jurisdiction doctrine?

This Article makes the case for its relevance, and demonstrates how the Dormant …


Analyzing The Virginia Workers' Compensation Act's Governance Of Employer Non-Compliance, D. Paul Holdsworth Nov 2016

Analyzing The Virginia Workers' Compensation Act's Governance Of Employer Non-Compliance, D. Paul Holdsworth

Law Student Publications

This essay attempts to resolve the current disconnect in the state judiciary‘s application of section 65.2-805(A) by analyzing the language of the statute as well as the various policy implications that undergird its establishment and accompany each interpretation. Part I provides a brief background of workers‘ compensation law generally, the Virginia Workers‘ Compensation Act (including section 65.2-805(A)), and the relevant case law involving section 65.2-805(A). Part II proceeds with the essay‘s argument, i.e., that section 65.2-805(A) should not be interpreted as imposing strict liability on non-compliant employers and thereby eliminating the obligation for a plaintiff-employee to plead a prima facie …


Grow Up Virginia: Time To Change Our Filial Responsibility Law, Sylvia Macon Nov 2016

Grow Up Virginia: Time To Change Our Filial Responsibility Law, Sylvia Macon

Law Student Publications

This comment discusses the background and development of filial responsibility laws in England, the United States, and Virginia in Part I. Part II explains the purpose behind implementation of such laws while Part III discusses the problems enforcing the filial responsibility law may cause. Lastly, Part IV explains why past reasons for keeping the law are no longer valid.


Family Law, Allison Anna Tait Nov 2016

Family Law, Allison Anna Tait

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Criminal Law And Procedure, Aaron J. Campbell Nov 2016

Criminal Law And Procedure, Aaron J. Campbell

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Issue 1: Table Of Contents Nov 2016

Issue 1: Table Of Contents

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Grow Up Virginia: Time To Change Our Filial Responsibility Law, Sylvia Macon Nov 2016

Grow Up Virginia: Time To Change Our Filial Responsibility Law, Sylvia Macon

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Foreclosure Of A Deed Of Trust In Virginia, Doug Rendleman Nov 2016

Foreclosure Of A Deed Of Trust In Virginia, Doug Rendleman

University of Richmond Law Review

This article deals with foreclosure of a deed of trust in Virginia.

The Introduction discusses the deed of trust or mortgage as a social

and political institution and the foreclosure crisis that seems

to be ending. Part I is a brief history of mortgage law. It provides

a short history of the modern mortgage system in the United

States. Part II follows with a description of the approach that

Virginia takes to mortgages. It localizes the mortgage institution

to Virginia and introduces Virginia's vocabulary and technical details,

the deed of trust, and the parties' rights and obligations.

Part III provides …


In Memoriam: Justice Antonin Scalia And The Constitution's Golden Thread, L. Margaret Harker Nov 2016

In Memoriam: Justice Antonin Scalia And The Constitution's Golden Thread, L. Margaret Harker

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Civil Practice And Procedure, Christopher S. Dadak Nov 2016

Civil Practice And Procedure, Christopher S. Dadak

University of Richmond Law Review

This article examines developments in Virginia civil procedure and practice in the past year. The survey includes a discussion of the relevant decisions from the Supreme Court of Virginia, changes to applicable rules of practice or procedure, and new legislation, which will likely affect the practice of a civil practitioner in the Commonwealth of Virginia.


Corporate And Business Law, Laurence V. Parker Jr. Nov 2016

Corporate And Business Law, Laurence V. Parker Jr.

University of Richmond Law Review

Over the past three years, there have been a number of legislative changes to Virginia's business entity statutes. In Part I,this article highlights the changes to the Virginia Stock Corporation Act ("VSCA") and the Virginia Nonstock Corporation Act ('"VNSCA"). Part II highlights changes to the Limited Liability Company Act ("LLC Act"). Part III summarizes Virginia's new intrastate crowdfunding law. The Supreme Court of Virginia has also addressed several significant issues over the last three years, including the applicability of appraisal rights in a stepped transaction. Part IV reviews several of the significant cases during this period.


Wills, Trusts, And Estates, J. William Gray Jr., Katherine E. Ramsey Nov 2016

Wills, Trusts, And Estates, J. William Gray Jr., Katherine E. Ramsey

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Will To Prevail: Inside The Legal Battle To Save Sweet Briar, William H. Hurd, Ashley L. Taylor Jr., Nancyellen Keane, Stephen C. Piepgrass, C. Reade Jacob Jr., James M. Giudice, J. Westwood Smithers Iii Nov 2016

The Will To Prevail: Inside The Legal Battle To Save Sweet Briar, William H. Hurd, Ashley L. Taylor Jr., Nancyellen Keane, Stephen C. Piepgrass, C. Reade Jacob Jr., James M. Giudice, J. Westwood Smithers Iii

University of Richmond Law Review

Part I provides an in-depth factual overview, beginning with the Sweet Briar College's founding in the early 1900s. The commentary then turns to the controversial decision to close and discusses the facts and legal theories of the case, the decisions by the circuit court and the Supreme Court of Virginia, and the eventual settlement that kept the school alive.

In Part II, the discussion shifts to the landmark nature of this case, not only for Sweet Briar College, but also for other Virginia colleges and non-profits around the country. The essay analyzes the legal questions arising from the case, including …


Innocent Suffering: The Unavailability Of Post-Conviction Relief In Virginia Courts, Kaitlyn Potter Nov 2016

Innocent Suffering: The Unavailability Of Post-Conviction Relief In Virginia Courts, Kaitlyn Potter

University of Richmond Law Review

This comment examines actual innocence in Virginia: the progress it has made, the problems it still faces, and the possibilities for reform. Part I addresses past reform to the system, spurred by the shocking tales of Thomas Haynesworth and others. Part II identifies three of the most prevalent systemic challenges marring Virginia's justice system: (1) flawed scientific evidence; (2) the premature destruction of evidence; and (3) false confessions and guilty pleas. Part III suggests ways in which Virginia can, and should, address these challenges to ensure that the justice system is actually serving justice.


Analyzing The Virginia Workers' Compensation Act's Governance Of Employer Non-Compliance, D. Paul Holdsworth Nov 2016

Analyzing The Virginia Workers' Compensation Act's Governance Of Employer Non-Compliance, D. Paul Holdsworth

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Taxation, Craig D. Bell Nov 2016

Taxation, Craig D. Bell

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Innocent Suffering: The Unavailability Of Post-Conviction Relief In Virginia Courts, Kaitlyn Potter Nov 2016

Innocent Suffering: The Unavailability Of Post-Conviction Relief In Virginia Courts, Kaitlyn Potter

Law Student Publications

This comment examines actual innocence in Virginia: the progress it has made, the problems it still faces, and the possibilities for reform. Part I addresses past reform to the system, spurred by the shocking tales of Thomas Haynesworth and others. Part II identifies three of the most prevalent systemic challenges marring Virginia‘s justice system: (1) flawed scientific evidence; (2) the premature destruction of evidence; and (3) false confessions and guilty pleas. Part III suggests ways in which Virginia can, and should, address these challenges to ensure that the justice system is actually serving justice.


Civil Practice And Procedure, Christopher S. Dadak Nov 2016

Civil Practice And Procedure, Christopher S. Dadak

Law Student Publications

Continuing in the rich vein of prior Annual Surveys, this article examines developments in Virginia civil procedure and practice in the past year. The survey includes a discussion of the relevant decisions from the Supreme Court of Virginia, changes to applicable rules of practice or procedure, and new legislation, which will likely affect the practice of a civil practitioner in the Commonwealth of Virginia.


National Security In The Information Age: Are We Heading Toward Big Brother?, William C. Banks, Jake Laperruque, Douglas Cox, Lt. Colonel Jeffrey Addicott, Paul Gill, Douglas A. Ramseur, Thomas J. Ridge Oct 2016

National Security In The Information Age: Are We Heading Toward Big Brother?, William C. Banks, Jake Laperruque, Douglas Cox, Lt. Colonel Jeffrey Addicott, Paul Gill, Douglas A. Ramseur, Thomas J. Ridge

University of Richmond Law Review Symposium

Symposium Welcome: Alexander McDaniel, Symposium Editor, University of Richmond Law Review, and Wendy C. Perdue, Dean of the University of Richmond School of Law. (9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.)

“How Does the Government Collect Data Through Surveillance?” Panel Discussion: William C. Banks, Distinguished Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law and Founding Director of the Institute for National Security and Counterterrorism, and Jake Laperruque, Privacy Fellow with The Constitution Project. Professor Paul D. Crane, Associate Professor at the University of Richmond School of Law, served as moderator. (9:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.)

“How Does the Government Retain and …


The Ftc’S Pae Study: Doing More Harm Than Good, Kristen Osenga Oct 2016

The Ftc’S Pae Study: Doing More Harm Than Good, Kristen Osenga

Law Faculty Publications

Recently, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) released a report of its study of patent assertion entities (PAEs). The report was long anticipated and could have gone a long way to shining some light on patent licensing firms – who they are, how they operate, and so on. After all, patent licensing firms are misunderstood, partially because so much of their activity is not visible to the public. In theory, because the FTC has the power to obtain this invisible information, the study could have provided the data and insight needed to better understand these firms and improve the policy dialogue …


E-Museletter: October 2016, Kathleen Klepfer Oct 2016

E-Museletter: October 2016, Kathleen Klepfer

Museletter

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Presidential Constitutional Interpretation, Signing Statements, Executive Power And Zivotofsky, Henry L. Chambers, Jr. Oct 2016

Presidential Constitutional Interpretation, Signing Statements, Executive Power And Zivotofsky, Henry L. Chambers, Jr.

Law Faculty Publications

This Article explores whether the President should interpret the Constitution aggressively and, if so, whether the President should act on such aggressive interpretations. Part I examines whether the presidential oath and other constitutional duties obligate the President to interpret the Constitution. Part II considers constitutional signing statements as the manifestation of an aggressive approach to presidential constitutional interpretation. Part III considers whether the Constitution is a legal document or a political document, and how that determination might affect how aggressive the President should be when interpreting the Constitution. Part IV considers how the Supreme Court's and Congress's constitutional interpretations might …


The Court After Scalia, Kevin C. Walsh Oct 2016

The Court After Scalia, Kevin C. Walsh

Law Faculty Publications

In this editorial, Professor Walsh surveys the 2015-2016 U.S. Supreme Court term, with particular attention to the effects the late Justice Antonin Scalia's absence had on the Court's decisions.