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With Liberty And Access For Some: The Aca's Disconnect For Women's Health, Nicole Huberfeld May 2013

With Liberty And Access For Some: The Aca's Disconnect For Women's Health, Nicole Huberfeld

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This Article will scrutinize the separation of abortion from other aspects of women's health through the vehicle of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Part I will examine briefly why the fragmented nature of American healthcare has facilitated the separation of abortion from women's health, despite the fact that abortion is a medically necessary procedure for many women. To that end, this Part will explore the disjointed history of access to medicine juxtaposed against the strangely non-woman-centric nature of the fundamental rights at play in reproductive health. Part II will provide an overview of the ACA to explain …


A Comparison Of The Role Of The Employer In The French And U.S. Health Care Systems, Kathryn L. Moore Apr 2013

A Comparison Of The Role Of The Employer In The French And U.S. Health Care Systems, Kathryn L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

The United States is unique among developed nations in its heavy reliance on employment-based health insurance. The United States, however, is not the only nation in which employers play an important role in the financing of health care. Indeed, long before employment-based health insurance became common in the United States, countries with social insurance systems, such as France, Germany, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, provided for the delivery of mandatory social insurance benefits, including health insurance, through the workplace.

This article explores the role of the employer in the health care system in one such country: France. The French health …


Heed Not The Umpire (Justice Ginsburg Called Nfib), Nicole Huberfeld Jan 2013

Heed Not The Umpire (Justice Ginsburg Called Nfib), Nicole Huberfeld

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

The pervasiveness of our healthcare problem seems to have bypassed most justices on the Supreme Court in the landmark case National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius (NFIB). And early commentary predominantly has focused on the constitutionality of the individual mandate, which codified the idea that Americans must have minimum health insurance coverage by January 1, 2014 or pay a tax penalty. Further narrowing the conversation, much of the postdecision commentary has also focused on Chief Justice Roberts’s constitutional analysis and its interplay with the joint dissent. This narrow scrutiny has resulted in missed opportunities: first, a critique of …


Where There Is A Right, There Must Be A Remedy (Even In Medicaid), Nicole Huberfeld Jan 2013

Where There Is A Right, There Must Be A Remedy (Even In Medicaid), Nicole Huberfeld

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This Article will explore the power struggle that Medicaid invites and its potential elevation due to the pressures that will follow the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) expansion. Part I of this Article will describe the three phases of private enforcement litigation and how they have affected Medicaid reimbursement rates. This Part also will highlight the deceptive stability that has taken root in the lower federal courts by describing the recent state attempts to end private enforcement actions. The first Part will conclude by briefly considering the nature of the federalism arguments that states are making. Part II …


Plunging Into Endless Difficulties: Medicaid And Coercion In National Federation Of Independent Business V. Sebelius, Nicole Huberfeld, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard, Kevin Outterson Jan 2013

Plunging Into Endless Difficulties: Medicaid And Coercion In National Federation Of Independent Business V. Sebelius, Nicole Huberfeld, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard, Kevin Outterson

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Until the 2011 Term, no Supreme Court decision since the New Deal had struck down an act of Congress as exceeding the federal spending power. The question of unconstitutionally coercive conditions was also novel. Indeed, no federal court had ever found any legislation to be an unconstitutionally coercive exercise of the spending power until the Court decided National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius (NFIB) on June 28, 2012. This Article proceeds as follows: Part I discusses the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion in the context of the history and purpose of the Medicaid Act, paying particular attention to facts …