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Full-Text Articles in Law

Dynamic Expansion, Nicole Huberfeld Nov 2013

Dynamic Expansion, Nicole Huberfeld

Faculty Scholarship

Nearly one in four Americans will have medical care and costs covered by the Medicaid program when it has been expanded pursuant to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the ACA). National media outlets have been reporting that only about half of the states are participating in the Medicaid expansion; if the reports were true, millions of Americans would be left without insurance coverage, and many of the nation’s medically fragile citizens would not have access to consistent healthcare. Contrary to these reports, most states will participate in the Medicaid expansion in the near future. This claim is not …


Approval And Withdrawal Of New Antibiotics And Other Antiinfectives In The U.S., 1980-2009, Kevin Outterson, John H. Powers, Enrique Seoane, Rosa Rodriguez-Monguio, Aaron S. Kesselheim Oct 2013

Approval And Withdrawal Of New Antibiotics And Other Antiinfectives In The U.S., 1980-2009, Kevin Outterson, John H. Powers, Enrique Seoane, Rosa Rodriguez-Monguio, Aaron S. Kesselheim

Faculty Scholarship

Concerns about a dearth of antibiotic innovation have spurred calls for incentives to speed the development of new antibiotics. Our data demonstrates that many of the new molecular entity (NME) antibioticsintroduced in the last 3 decades were withdrawn from the market, at more than triple the rate of other drug classes. Adjusted for these withdrawals, the net introduction of NME antibiotics is not as troubling of a trend. The reduction in NME antibiotics was partially offset by a surge in the introduction of NME antiretrovirals for HIV/AIDS and other drug classes (such as cardiovascular drugs) posted similar declines.

These data …


Legally Blind: The Therapeutic Illusion In The Support Study Of Extremely Premature Infants, George J. Annas, Catherine L. Annas Oct 2013

Legally Blind: The Therapeutic Illusion In The Support Study Of Extremely Premature Infants, George J. Annas, Catherine L. Annas

Faculty Scholarship

Physician-researchers follow a protocol to generate generalizable knowledge; physicians have a duty to treat patients in ways they and their patients think best. In both activities, research and treatment, physicians often see themselves simply as physicians, practicing medicine. Sick people have similar perception difficulties, and prefer to think of their physician-researcher simply as their physician, even when their treatment is 2 determined by a protocol or the flip of a coin. Almost 20 years ago, in this Journal, one of us suggested that at least some researchers use language "to obscure; to blur or eliminate the distinctions between research …


Limiting “Sugary Drinks” To Reduce Obesity — Who Decides?, Wendy K. Mariner, George J. Annas May 2013

Limiting “Sugary Drinks” To Reduce Obesity — Who Decides?, Wendy K. Mariner, George J. Annas

Faculty Scholarship

When a judge struck down the New York City Board of Health's partial ban on selling “sugary drinks” in containers of more than 16 fluid ounces, the reaction was swift. The Portion Cap Rule was widely viewed as a signature accomplishment of Mayor Michael Bloomberg's third term as the “public health mayor,” and he vowed to appeal, saying, “I've got to defend my children, and yours, and do what's right to save lives. Obesity kills.” But the question before the judge was not about the health risks posed by obesity or even the relationship between obesity and access to large …


"At The Hospital There Are No Human Rights": Reproductive And Sexual Rights Violations Of Women Living With Hiv In Namibia, Aziza Ahmed Feb 2013

"At The Hospital There Are No Human Rights": Reproductive And Sexual Rights Violations Of Women Living With Hiv In Namibia, Aziza Ahmed

Faculty Scholarship

This report documents the ongoing stigma and discrimination of women living with HIV in Namibia, building on prior findings and investigations on the subject, such as the 2008 research conducted by the International Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS (ICW) and the Namibian Women’s Health Network (NWHN). The report, based upon both desk research and a field mission, examines the human rights situation related to sexual and reproductive health of women living with HIV, including the gravity and ongoing nature of forced and coerced sterilizations in Namibia. The report also provides evidence of violations of informed consent in the context …


Distributions Of Industry Payments To Massachusetts Physicians, Christopher Robertson Jan 2013

Distributions Of Industry Payments To Massachusetts Physicians, Christopher Robertson

Faculty Scholarship

Some states have mandated systematic public disclosure of payments made by drug- and device-makers to health care practitioners. We used Massachusetts data to characterize the distribution of payment types and the variation among medical specialties.

The 30 months’ of data included 32,227 reported payments to 11,734 Massachusetts physicians, for a total of $76.7 million. The most common form of payment was food. Compensation for bona fide services was the payment type with the highest value.

We found that 25% of currently licensed Massachusetts physicians received at least one payment during the study period. Prevalence ranged by specialties from pediatricians (12%) …


Where There Is A Right, There Must Be A Remedy (Even In Medicaid), Nicole Huberfeld Jan 2013

Where There Is A Right, There Must Be A Remedy (Even In Medicaid), Nicole Huberfeld

Faculty Scholarship

The anticipated growth of Medicaid under the ACA will likely aggravate an ongoing dispute surrounding private enforcement of the Medicaid Act. The Medicaid Act does not provide a private right of action except when a person who is eligible for Medicaid is denied entry into the program. Nevertheless, historically, both Medicaid providers and beneficiaries have been able to protect their rights through 42 U.S.C. § 1983, which allows individuals to seek redress against states in federal court for violations of statutory or constitutional rights, or through the Supremacy Clause, which prevents states from enacting laws that violate superseding federal laws. …


Did Legal Education Fail Health Reform? And How Health Law Can Help, Wendy K. Mariner Jan 2013

Did Legal Education Fail Health Reform? And How Health Law Can Help, Wendy K. Mariner

Faculty Scholarship

Arguments over the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act illustrate the pervasiveness of health law issues in society. In court, arguments on both sides also demonstrated insufficient knowledge of the health care system and health insurance to identify and present useful arguments. Too many lawyers remained wedded to theories of constitutional law that have become disconnected from twenty-first century realities. Legal education may have something to answer for in this respect. This essay examines how legal education in health law may offer some valuable responses to ongoing critiques of legal education in general. The more law moves away from strict …


“Rugged Vaginas” And “Vulnerable Rectums”: The Sexual Identity, Epidemiology, And Law Of The Global Hiv Epidemic, Aziza Ahmed Jan 2013

“Rugged Vaginas” And “Vulnerable Rectums”: The Sexual Identity, Epidemiology, And Law Of The Global Hiv Epidemic, Aziza Ahmed

Faculty Scholarship

AIDS remains amongst the leading causes of death globally. Identity is the primary mode of understanding HIV and organizing in response to the HIV epidemic. In this Article, I examine how epidemiology and human rights activism co-produce ideas of identity and risk. I call this the "identity/risk narrative ": the commonsense understanding about an identity group's HIV risk. For example, epidemiology offers the biological narrative of risk: anal sex and the weak rectal lining make men who have sex with men more vulnerable to HIV; while the fragility of a woman's vaginal wall provides a biological foundation for women's vulnerability. …


Plunging Into Endless Difficulties: Medicaid And Coercion In National Federation Of Independent Business V. Sebelius, Kevin Outterson, Nicole Huberfeld, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard Jan 2013

Plunging Into Endless Difficulties: Medicaid And Coercion In National Federation Of Independent Business V. Sebelius, Kevin Outterson, Nicole Huberfeld, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard

Faculty Scholarship

Of the four discrete questions before the Court in National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Medicaid expansion held the greatest potential for destabilization from both a statutory and a constitutional perspective. As authors of an amicus brief supporting the Medicaid expansion, and scholars with expertise in health law who have been cited by the Court, we show in this article why NFIB is likely to fulfill that promise.

For the first time in its history, the Court held federal legislation based upon the spending power to be unconstitutionally coercive. Chief Justice Roberts’ plurality (joined for future voting purposes …


With Liberty And Access For Some: The Aca's Disconnectfor Women's Health, Nicole Huberfeld Jan 2013

With Liberty And Access For Some: The Aca's Disconnectfor Women's Health, Nicole Huberfeld

Faculty Scholarship

The ACA denies to women the "basic security" of providing insurance for a procedure that statistics show one in three women will need during their reproductive lifetime. On one hand, the access-enhancing elements of the ACA are likely to help women, who earn lower wages, need more medical care, and live longer than men, to gain access to preventive and regular healthcare and to keep the insurance that they have. On the other hand, poor women and women of color will lose ground in access to abortion, because the ACA prevents insurance payment for abortions through both public and private …