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Articles 1 - 17 of 17

Full-Text Articles in Law

Israel, Palestine, And The Icc, Daniel Benoliel, Ronen Perry Oct 2010

Israel, Palestine, And The Icc, Daniel Benoliel, Ronen Perry

Michigan Journal of International Law

In the wake of the Israel-Gaza 2008-09 armed conflict and recently commenced process at the International Criminal Court (ICC), the Court will soon face a major challenge with the potential to determine its degree of judicial independence and overall legitimacy. It may need to decide whether a Palestinian state exists, either for the purposes of the Court itself, or perhaps even in general. The ICC, which currently has 113 member states, has not yet recognized Palestine as a sovereign state or as a member. Moreover, although the ICC potentially has the authority to investigate crimes which fall into its subject-matter …


Designing Bespoke Transitional Justice: A Pluralist Process Approach, Jaya Ramji-Nogales Oct 2010

Designing Bespoke Transitional Justice: A Pluralist Process Approach, Jaya Ramji-Nogales

Michigan Journal of International Law

Although many scholars agree that contemporary transitional justice mechanisms are flawed, a comprehensive and unified alternative approach to accountability for mass violence has yet to be propounded. Like many international lawyers, transitional justice theorists have focused their assessment efforts on the successes and failures of established institutions. This Article argues that before we can measure whether transitional justice is working, we must begin with a theory of what it is trying to achieve. Once we have a coherent theory, we must use it ex ante, to design effective transitional justice mechanisms, not just to assess their effectiveness ex post. Drawing …


The U.S. Codification Of War Crimes: 18 Usca §2441, Hamed Adibnatanzi Aug 2010

The U.S. Codification Of War Crimes: 18 Usca §2441, Hamed Adibnatanzi

Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law

The purpose of this paper is to examine the U.S. codification of its Geneva Convention obligations to prosecute war crimes. The War Crimes Statute is rarely used for its original enactment purpose. Instead the cases that have appeared are in response to political maneuvering in detaining foreign enemy combatants. The War Crimes Statute has been used with the Geneva Convention in order to guarantee detainees certain fundamental rights to due process and impartial hearings. Finally, the paper examines some of the Legislative responses to this judicial interpretation and the new proposed War Crimes Statute.


A Kind Of Judgment: Searching For Judicial Narratives After Death, Timothy W. Waters Aug 2010

A Kind Of Judgment: Searching For Judicial Narratives After Death, Timothy W. Waters

Timothy W Waters

This Article is a work of original research interrogating the relationship between international criminal law and post-conflict reconciliation. Much of international criminal law’s attraction rests on the authoritative narrative theory: the claim that law’s authoritative judgments create incontestable narratives, which form the foundation for reconciliation in divided societies. So what happens when there is no judgment? By turning scholarship’s attention towards a terminated trial, this Article develops an indirect but powerful challenge to one of the dominant views about what international criminal law is for, with interdisciplinary implications for international law, international relations, diplomacy and political science. What can be …


Mohammed Jawad And The Failure Of The Guantanamo Military Commissions, David J. Frakt Apr 2010

Mohammed Jawad And The Failure Of The Guantanamo Military Commissions, David J. Frakt

David J Frakt

In order to justify outrageous treatment of detainees at Guantanamo during the early years of the “Global War on Terror” it was necessary to portray the detainees as hardened terrorist criminals. But it was not enough to simply label them as such; the Bush Administration knew that in order to maintain popular support for their detention policies, they would have to convict a critical mass of the detainees in some sort of legal proceedings.

The problem for the Bush Administration was that few of the detainees were actually involved in any terrorist criminal activity. Fewer still had committed any offenses …


Bashir And The Icc, Kurt Mills Mar 2010

Bashir And The Icc, Kurt Mills

Human Rights & Human Welfare

Nesrine Malik argues that the International Criminal Court (ICC) made a mistake when it declared that it might charge Omar al Bashir with genocide, in addition to the existing charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. She argues that the court’s ruling will contribute to Bashir's propaganda efforts and that the current charges have had no appreciable effect. Given the extreme duplicity of Bashir and the other crimes he has quite clearly committed, it is unclear how the genocide charge would make a big difference.


Can The Icc Ever Get It Right?, Richard Burchill Mar 2010

Can The Icc Ever Get It Right?, Richard Burchill

Human Rights & Human Welfare

Nesrine Malik makes clear with her title, “The ICC’s Blunder on Sudan,” that something has gone amiss with the efforts of Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo to ensure the ICC statute is applied to those circumstances it was meant to address. But why is something amiss in this situation? The Prosecutor has a mandate and the legal regime for the ICC is relatively clear (at least procedurally); the crimes it covers can always be debated, but there is a degree of clarity present as to what acts are addressed; so what has gone wrong? The difficulty lies in expectations about justice and …


Politics And The Law: Enforcing Judicial Integrity, Anna Talbot Mar 2010

Politics And The Law: Enforcing Judicial Integrity, Anna Talbot

Human Rights & Human Welfare

The ruling by the International Criminal Court (ICC) in early February concerning the arrest warrant for Omar al-Bashir provoked controversy. The role of the Court has been called into question, with Nesrine Malik’s piece surmising that the ruling has shown that the Court is out of touch with political reality. She argues that the decision plays into the hands of authorities who are using it to their own political ends; that the charge of genocide is unjustified; and that the practicalities of enforcement undermine the Court.


Confronting The Politics And Law Behind Battles Over The Icc’S Bashir Indictment, Anthony Chase Mar 2010

Confronting The Politics And Law Behind Battles Over The Icc’S Bashir Indictment, Anthony Chase

Human Rights & Human Welfare

Nesrine Malik points in the wrong direction in arguing that charges of genocide embarrass the ICC more than they do Omar al-Bashir. The embarrassment here should come from those, such as Malik, who snidely downplay the level of war crimes committed in Darfur, who discuss genocide as if it is a cultural rather than political matter (does Malik seriously think genocide ever has anything to do with a country’s cultural traditions, as she says in defending Sudan?), or who naively give credence to predictable political push-back from Sudan and its allies. The ICC faces serious legal and political obstacles, some …


March Roundtable: Icc And Darfur Introduction Mar 2010

March Roundtable: Icc And Darfur Introduction

Human Rights & Human Welfare

An annotation of:

“The ICC's Blunder on Sudan” by Nesrine Malik. The Guardian. February 4, 2010.


The Take Down: Case Studies Regarding "Lawfare" In International Criminal Justice: The West African Experience, David M. Crane Jan 2010

The Take Down: Case Studies Regarding "Lawfare" In International Criminal Justice: The West African Experience, David M. Crane

Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.


Finding Facts But Missing The Law: The Goldstone Report, Gaza And Lawfare, Laurie R. Blank Jan 2010

Finding Facts But Missing The Law: The Goldstone Report, Gaza And Lawfare, Laurie R. Blank

Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.


Lawfare: Where Justice Meets Peace, James Ogoola Hon. Jan 2010

Lawfare: Where Justice Meets Peace, James Ogoola Hon.

Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.


The International War Crimes (Tribunal) Act, 1973 Of Bangladesh, Zakia Afrin Jan 2010

The International War Crimes (Tribunal) Act, 1973 Of Bangladesh, Zakia Afrin

Publications

Bangladesh earned her independence from Pakistan in 1971 after a bloody war that continued for nine months. By December 16 of 1971, the day Bangladesh declared victory, an estimated 30 million people died and 200,000 women reported sexual violence by the Pakistani Army and their Bengali accomplices. Known as one of the worst genocide in history, the systematic killing of Bengalis included a chilling attempt to exterminate the intellectuals from within Bangladeshi society. A published report claims that by 19 April, 1975 individuals were arrested for war crimes and 752 were convicted. After the assassination of the country’s first Prime …


Illustrating Illegitimate Lawfare, Michael A. Newton Jan 2010

Illustrating Illegitimate Lawfare, Michael A. Newton

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Lawfare that erodes the good faith application of the laws and customs of warfare is illegitimate and untenable. This essay outlines the contours of such illegitimate lawfare and provides current examples to guide practitioners. Clearly addressing the terminological imprecision in current understandings of lawfare, this essay is intended to help prevent further erosion of the corpus of jus in bello. Words matter, particularly when they are charged with legal significance and purport to convey legal rights and obligations. When purported legal “developments” actually undermine respect for the application and enforcement of humanitarian law, they are illegitimate. Although the laws and …


Reconsidering Reprisals, Michael A. Newton Jan 2010

Reconsidering Reprisals, Michael A. Newton

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

The prohibition on the use of reprisals is widely regarded as one of the most sacrosanct statements of the jus in bello applicable to the conduct of modern hostilities. The textual formulations are stark and subject to no derogations. Supporters of the bright line ban describe it as a vital bulwark against barbarity. In the words of the International Committee of the Red Cross, the prohibition is absolute, despite the fact that the declarations of key states indicate residual ambiguity over the scope of permissible reprisals, particularly in the context of non-international armed conflicts. Reprisals are a recurring feature of …


R. V. Munyaneza: Pondering Canada's First Core Crimes Conviction, Robert Currie Jan 2010

R. V. Munyaneza: Pondering Canada's First Core Crimes Conviction, Robert Currie

Articles, Book Chapters, & Popular Press

Canada recently completed its first genocide trial, which resulted in the conviction of the Rwandan accused, Desiré Munyaneza, for crimes committed during the Rwandan genocide. While the case is still under appeal, it represents a significant success for Canada’s relatively new core crimes legislation, the Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act, and was the first prosecution undertaken pursuant to that law. Drawing upon the Munyaneza case, the authors analyze the legislation and evaluate its effectiveness. They conclude that the model is an effective one that both bodes well for Canada’s future participation in the battle against impunity, and provides …