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Full-Text Articles in Law

Editor’S Note: Introducing The University Of New Hampshire Law Review, Luke Nelson, Terri Nolan Dec 2010

Editor’S Note: Introducing The University Of New Hampshire Law Review, Luke Nelson, Terri Nolan

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

Note from the Editor introducing the University of New Hampshire Law Review.


Legal Research In An Electronic Age: Electronic Data Discovery, A Litigation Albatross Of Gigantic Proportions, Ahunanya Anga Dec 2010

Legal Research In An Electronic Age: Electronic Data Discovery, A Litigation Albatross Of Gigantic Proportions, Ahunanya Anga

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “The increase in e-discovery, e-discovery‘s impact on litigation, and the courts‘ unavoidable role in defining the limits of discovery led to the author‘s decision to develop this article. The availability, accessibility, and the ease of requesting electronic data, resulting in increased e-discovery under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, is an important issue that will affect the legal profession and its constituents in many ways for years to come. Part II of this article is an overview of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 26(f). This part stresses that in recognizing the herculean task involved in e-discovery, courts expect that …


Law Clerks Out Of Context, Parker B. Potter Jr. Dec 2010

Law Clerks Out Of Context, Parker B. Potter Jr.

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “In a previous article, I examined judicial opinions in cases in which law clerks have gone wild, principally by doing things that law clerks just aren‘t supposed to do, such as convening court, conducting independent factual investigations into matters before their judges, or leaking drafts of opinions to the press. Here, I focus on opinions in federal cases that discuss two other categories of unusual law-clerk activity, serving as a source of evidence, and going to court, as a litigant.

The article is informed by my ten years of experience as a trial court law clerk in the state …


Table Of Contents, Volume 9, Number 1, 2010, Editorial Board Dec 2010

Table Of Contents, Volume 9, Number 1, 2010, Editorial Board

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

Table of Contents for Volume Nine, Issue Number One.


One Toke Over The Line: The Proliferation Of State Medical Marijuana Laws, Troy E. Grandel Dec 2010

One Toke Over The Line: The Proliferation Of State Medical Marijuana Laws, Troy E. Grandel

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “Marijuana has been used for medicinal purposes for at least five thousand years. In fact, it was used medicinally in the United States up until the twentieth century when antidrug zealots managed to prohibit it. Prohibition was the status quo until 1996 when California became the first state to adopt a law allowing medicinal marijuana use. Since then, thirteen additional states, along with the District of Columbia, have enacted similar laws. More states are now lining up with their own laws, which are in various stages of adoption. In addition, the Supreme Court has impacted the issue, both with …


Exhausted Or Unlicensed: Can Field-Of-Use Restrictions In Biotech License Agreements Still Prevent Off-Label Use Promotion After Quanta Computer?, Kristal M. Wicks Dec 2010

Exhausted Or Unlicensed: Can Field-Of-Use Restrictions In Biotech License Agreements Still Prevent Off-Label Use Promotion After Quanta Computer?, Kristal M. Wicks

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “In the biotechnology (biotech) industry, companies must be increasingly aware of their intellectual property and how their licensing strategies can impact their rights. When licensing patented technology, it is common practice for biotech companies to include restricted field-of-use provisions in their license agreements. Such provisions permit a licensee to only use licensed technology in a defined field and restrict use or development in another field. This licensing strategy plays an important role within the biotech industry because it allows companies to more effectively control their intellectual property and to more efficiently research and develop pharmaceutical products.

A problem that …


Masthead, Volume 9, Number 1, 2010, Editorial Board Dec 2010

Masthead, Volume 9, Number 1, 2010, Editorial Board

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

Masthead for Volume Nine, Issue Number One.


42 U.S.C. § 1983: A Legal Vehicle With No International Human Rights Treaty Passengers, Matthew J. Jowanna Dec 2010

42 U.S.C. § 1983: A Legal Vehicle With No International Human Rights Treaty Passengers, Matthew J. Jowanna

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “How do international human rights treaties interact with the domestic civil rights law of the United States and, particularly, 42 U.S.C. § 1983? How should international human rights treaties interact with the domestic civil rights law of the United States? ―International law is part of our law, and must be ascertained and administered by the courts of justice of appropriate jurisdiction, as often as questions of right depending upon it are duly presented for their determination. The United States is obligated to respect the international treaties it ratifies, whether they are fully implemented in domestic law or not. In …


Taking Away An Artist’S “Get Out Of Jail Free” Card: Making Changes And Applying Basic Contract Principles To California’S Talent Agencies Act, Gregory Albert May 2010

Taking Away An Artist’S “Get Out Of Jail Free” Card: Making Changes And Applying Basic Contract Principles To California’S Talent Agencies Act, Gregory Albert

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “From its predecessors dating back to 1913 to the current version, the California Talent Agencies Act of 1978 (“TAA” or “the Act”) has aimed to protect artists from talent agents who would take advantage of them. The Act originally prohibited agents from “sending artists to ‘house[s] of ill fame’ or saloons, or allowing ‘persons of bad character’ to frequent their establishments.” By requiring talent agents to have a license, “the Act establishes detailed requirements for how the licensed talent agencies conduct their business, including a code of conduct, submission of contracts and fee schedules to the state, maintenance of …


Table Of Contents, Volume 8, Number 3, 2010, Editorial Board May 2010

Table Of Contents, Volume 8, Number 3, 2010, Editorial Board

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

Table of Contents for Volume Eight, Issue Number Three.


Masthead, Volume 8, Number 3, 2010, Editorial Board May 2010

Masthead, Volume 8, Number 3, 2010, Editorial Board

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

Masthead for Volume Eight, Issue Number Three.


Missing The Forest For The Trees: Forest Grove School District V. T.A., Theresa Kraft May 2010

Missing The Forest For The Trees: Forest Grove School District V. T.A., Theresa Kraft

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) guarantees children who qualify as children with disabilities the right to receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE). There are many points at which parents and school districts may disagree regarding the provision of a FAPE, but as the U.S. Supreme Court has determined in Forest Grove School District v. T.A., when parents and a school district disagree regarding whether children should be identified as children with disabilities, an appropriate remedy could be tuition reimbursement.”


Will Residency Be Relevant To Public Education In The Twenty-First Century?, Sarah L. Browning May 2010

Will Residency Be Relevant To Public Education In The Twenty-First Century?, Sarah L. Browning

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “Long before the framers of New Hampshire’s first constitution admonished legislatures and magistrates to cherish education, the provincial government had already established requirements for providing public education; these requirements were related to the size of a settlement.

By 1708, the provincial government in New Hampshire had established the first public school. Not surprisingly, the school was in Portsmouth, which was, at the time, the seat of the provincial government. On May 2, 1719, the province passed an act that required communities of fifty families to employ a school teacher. Under the same act, a community that had one hundred …


The Educational Pipeline To Law School—Too Broken And Too Narrow To Provide Diversity, Sarah E. Redfield May 2010

The Educational Pipeline To Law School—Too Broken And Too Narrow To Provide Diversity, Sarah E. Redfield

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “The legal profession remains markedly out of sync with the changing demographics of the country, where the population is projected to be over 50 percent minority by 2050. Against this trend, law school enrollment hovers around 20 percent minority, including over 7 percent Asian students. Enrollment of some minority groups shows a decline rather than improvement. These numbers will remain static or continue to decline if the profession does not pay far more serious attention to the current leaks and gaps along the educational pipeline, far before students seek admission at the law school gates.”


Bringing To Heel The Elephants In The Economy: The Case For Ending “Too Big To Fail”, Ann Graham Feb 2010

Bringing To Heel The Elephants In The Economy: The Case For Ending “Too Big To Fail”, Ann Graham

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “Financial institutions labeled “Too Big To Fail” (TBTF) are those whose insolvency could shake the foundations of the U.S. financial system and our economy. The term “too big to fail” became part of our popular vocabulary in the wake of federal bank regulatory intervention to prevent the failure of Continental Illinois National Bank in 1984. After the banking and savings-and-loan crisis of the 1980s, the pros and cons of the TBTF policy were extensively debated. Despite Congressional efforts to limit application of TBTF, the doctrine has returned with renewed vigor during the current crisis. Responding on an ad hoc …


Controlling Patent Prosecution History, Thomas G. Field Jr. Feb 2010

Controlling Patent Prosecution History, Thomas G. Field Jr.

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “One of the most salient effects of patent prosecution history arises in the context of the doctrine of equivalents. Under that doctrine, although patent claims may be found to be broader than their literal scope, territory surrendered during prosecution cannot be encompassed as equivalent. Nor can territory forfeited by initial failure to claim be captured under the doctrine of equivalents. Most attorneys who prosecute applications are apt to be aware of such problems and to take measures to avoid them.”


The Fluctuating Workweek: How It Works, How It’S Treated, How It’S Perceived, Anthony J. Galdieri Feb 2010

The Fluctuating Workweek: How It Works, How It’S Treated, How It’S Perceived, Anthony J. Galdieri

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “This article argues that the fluctuating workweek method of overtime compensation is a viable alternative to the traditional method of overtime compensation. First, it will explain how the fluctuating workweek works and how state courts have treated it. Second, it will debunk several misconceptions about the fluctuating workweek. Finally, it will show that employers are working small numbers of employees for long hours because paying overtime is cheaper today than hiring new employees.


Masthead, Volume 8, Number 2, 2010, Editorial Board Feb 2010

Masthead, Volume 8, Number 2, 2010, Editorial Board

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

Masthead for Volume Eight, Issue Number Two.


Handling Fiduciary Issues In Limited Liability Company Formations Under The New Hampshire Limited Liability Company Act—A Practical Introduction, John M. Cunningham Feb 2010

Handling Fiduciary Issues In Limited Liability Company Formations Under The New Hampshire Limited Liability Company Act—A Practical Introduction, John M. Cunningham

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “Absent an agreement among the parties to the contrary, business entity fiduciary duties arise automatically under state common law and applicable statutory law whenever one person entrusts the management of his or her business to another person and the other person agrees to accept this entrustment. The two principal fiduciary duties are the duty of care and the duty of loyalty. The duty of care requires that business managers carry out their management responsibilities non-negligently. The duty of loyalty requires that business managers avoid conflicts of interest with the entity that they have agreed to manage.

However, the common …


State V. Burgess: A Limitation On A Defendant’S Right To Remain Innocent, Elizabeth Lahey Feb 2010

State V. Burgess: A Limitation On A Defendant’S Right To Remain Innocent, Elizabeth Lahey

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “This note will explore the current state of the privilege against self-incrimination, particularly in regard to whether it works to bar negative inferences from being drawn from a defendant’s silence during sentencing in order to determine his remorse for the crime of which he has been convicted. I will focus primarily on the issue in the context of the recent New Hampshire case State v. Burgess. In that case, the court recognized the application of the privilege at sentencing, but nonetheless carved out a unique exception which made negative inferences permissible at sentencing when the defendant has admitted to …


Table Of Contents, Volume 8, Number 2, 2010, Editorial Board Feb 2010

Table Of Contents, Volume 8, Number 2, 2010, Editorial Board

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

Table of Contents for Volume Eight, Issue Number Two.