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2010

Religion Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Sharia Law Poses No Threat To American Courts, Nathan B. Oman Dec 2010

Sharia Law Poses No Threat To American Courts, Nathan B. Oman

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Religion: How To Stay Out Of Court, Kenneth Akers, Sara Rotramel, Jorge Wellmann Dec 2010

Religion: How To Stay Out Of Court, Kenneth Akers, Sara Rotramel, Jorge Wellmann

Parameters of Law in Student Affairs and Higher Education (CNS 670)

In the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America, it reads that, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” This single sentence, the Establishment Clause, is the backbone of religious freedom in the United States, and with its several annotations it has given shape and breadth to the concept of religion in America, more specifically our topic, i.e. …


Religion In The Abortion Discourse In Singapore: A Case Study Of The Relevance Of Religious Arguments In Law-Making In Multi-Religious Democracies, Seow Hon Tan Dec 2010

Religion In The Abortion Discourse In Singapore: A Case Study Of The Relevance Of Religious Arguments In Law-Making In Multi-Religious Democracies, Seow Hon Tan

Research Collection Yong Pung How School Of Law

The article discusses the social issue on religion in the abortion discourse in Singapore. It mentions the relevance of religious arguments in law-making in multi-religious democracies. It notes that laws on abortion vary across different jurisdictions, like prohibiting abortion under all circumstances to freely allowing it without restriction as to reason.


Can Congress Ban People From Threatening To Burn The Quran? Yes: No Rights Are Absolute, Especially Amid Legitimate Safety Issues, Jessica D. Gabel Oct 2010

Can Congress Ban People From Threatening To Burn The Quran? Yes: No Rights Are Absolute, Especially Amid Legitimate Safety Issues, Jessica D. Gabel

Faculty Publications By Year

No abstract provided.


Seeking Truth On The Other Side Of The Wall: Greenleaf’S Evangelists Meet The Federal Rules, Naturalism, And Judas, Nancy J. Kippenhan Oct 2010

Seeking Truth On The Other Side Of The Wall: Greenleaf’S Evangelists Meet The Federal Rules, Naturalism, And Judas, Nancy J. Kippenhan

Faculty Publications and Presentations

An inquiry that seeks truth by accepting only natural answers excludes the possibility of the sacred or supernatural, building a wall that forecloses a complete exploration for the truth it seeks. Without analysis, critics dismiss sources presenting supernatural explanations, and those who believe sacred works have no factual foundation accept without investigation any popular theory that appears attractive. The rules of evidence expressly seek truth, wherever it lies. Noted legal scholar Simon Greenleaf used evidentiary principles to demonstrate the factual credibility of the Gospels in his Testimony of the Evangelists. This Article examines Greenleaf’s analysis, applying current rules of evidence …


Panel Discussion At "Signs Of The Times: The First Amendment And Religious Symbolism", Carl H. Esbeck Oct 2010

Panel Discussion At "Signs Of The Times: The First Amendment And Religious Symbolism", Carl H. Esbeck

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Bargaining In The Shadow Of God's Law: Islamic Mahr Contracts And The Perils Of Legal Specialization, Nathan B. Oman Oct 2010

Bargaining In The Shadow Of God's Law: Islamic Mahr Contracts And The Perils Of Legal Specialization, Nathan B. Oman

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Veiled Women In The American Courtroom: Is The Niqab A Barrier To Justice?, Anita L. Allen Sep 2010

Veiled Women In The American Courtroom: Is The Niqab A Barrier To Justice?, Anita L. Allen

All Faculty Scholarship

U.S. courts and policy-makers have recently authorized laws and practices that interfere with the wearing of religious modesty attire that conceals the hair or face in contexts such as courtroom testimony or driver’s license issuance. For example, in response to a court’s dismissal of the case of a woman who refused to remove her niqab in the courtroom, the Michigan Supreme Court decided that judges can exercise “reasonable control” over the appearance of courtroom parties. But what degree of control over religious attire is reasonable? The Constitution will not allow a blanket niqab removal policy based on any of the …


Preservation Ethics In The Case Of Nebraska’S Nationally Registered Historic Properties, Darren Michael Adams Jul 2010

Preservation Ethics In The Case Of Nebraska’S Nationally Registered Historic Properties, Darren Michael Adams

Department of Geography: Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research

This dissertation focuses on the National Register of Historic Places and considers the geographical implications of valuing particular historic sites over others. Certain historical sites will either gain or lose desirability from one era to the next, this dissertation identifies and explains three unique preservation ethical eras, and it maps the sites which were selected during those eras. These eras are the Settlement Era (1966 – 1975), the Commercial Architecture Era (1976 – 1991), and the Progressive Planning Era (1992 – 2010). The findings show that transformations in the program included an early phase when state authorities listed historical resources …


Essay: Constitutional Commitments And Religious Identity, Bernadette Meyler Jul 2010

Essay: Constitutional Commitments And Religious Identity, Bernadette Meyler

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This essay comments on Steve Shiffrin's The Religious Left and Church-State Relations. It contends, on the one hand, that Shiffrin has valuably brought to the fore various reasons why religious believers might resist close relations between church and state. On the other hand, it argues that no fundamental connection exists between the "religious Left" and a particular position on church-state relations and that religious liberals will not necessarily be more persuasive than secular liberals in arguing against positions espoused by religious conservatives.


The Fallacy Of Neutrality From Beginning To End: The Battle Between Religious Liberties And Rights Based On Homosexual Conduct, Rena M. Lindevaldsen Apr 2010

The Fallacy Of Neutrality From Beginning To End: The Battle Between Religious Liberties And Rights Based On Homosexual Conduct, Rena M. Lindevaldsen

Faculty Publications and Presentations

The Bible plainly states that everyone must either "bring every thought into captivity to the obedience of Christ" or continue as "enemies in your mind." Un-Biblical thinking, like un-Bibical actions, leads one on a path away from God. Part II of this Article will briefly introduce a Biblical approach to thinking about contemporary issues and discuss how Christians can unwittingly abandon distinctively Biblical thinking under the guise of neutrality. Part III will present a number of cases that highlight the fallacy of neutrality in the battle between religious liberties and rights based on homosexual conduct. Part IV will contend that …


Legislative Prayer And The Secret Costs Of Religious Endorsements, Christopher C. Lund Apr 2010

Legislative Prayer And The Secret Costs Of Religious Endorsements, Christopher C. Lund

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Are Catholics Unreliable From A Democratic Point Of View? Thoughts On The Occasion Of The Sixtieth Anniversary Of Paul Blanshard's American Freedom And Catholic Power, Patrick Mckinley Brennan Feb 2010

Are Catholics Unreliable From A Democratic Point Of View? Thoughts On The Occasion Of The Sixtieth Anniversary Of Paul Blanshard's American Freedom And Catholic Power, Patrick Mckinley Brennan

Working Paper Series

From 1949 to 1950, Paul Blanshard’s American Freedom and Catholic Power dominated the New York Times best-seller list for eleven months, having captured the attention of American intelligentsia with its claim that “the Catholic problem is still with us” and its call for the formation of a “resistance movement.” Sixty years later, Blanshard’s bigotry is no longer defended in educated circles. Questions remain, though, concerning why Blanshard’s ideas made progress in some of the smartest American minds and throughout much of the culture. Was Blanshard onto something subversive about Catholics? Are Catholics’ commitments not compatible with the demands of American …


Are Legislation And Rules A Problem In Law? Thoughts On The Work Of Joseph Vining, Patrick Mckinley Brennan Feb 2010

Are Legislation And Rules A Problem In Law? Thoughts On The Work Of Joseph Vining, Patrick Mckinley Brennan

Working Paper Series

Written for a conference at Villanova Law School held to celebrate and explore the work of Joseph Vining over forty years, this paper considers the adequacy of Vining’s phenomenology of law. Specifically, it inquires into the accuracy of Vining’s startling claims that “legislation is a problem in law, not central to law” and “rules are nowhere to be found” in law. The argument of the paper is that when -- but only when -- law is understood to be an ordinance of reason in the mind of him or them who have care of the community, for the common good, …


The Protection Of Religious Liberty Under The American Constitution, Robert A. Sedler Jan 2010

The Protection Of Religious Liberty Under The American Constitution, Robert A. Sedler

Law Faculty Research Publications

Religious liberty is a favored value under the United States Constitution. The Constitution provides two-fold protection to religious liberty by means of the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause. The Establishment Clause, sometimes referred to as the separation of church and state, requires that the government maintain a course of complete official neutrality toward religion. The government cannot favor one religion over another, nor can it favor religion over non-religion. The Free Exercise Clause is a textual guarantee of peoples' right to practice their religion and to hold and act on religious beliefs. The First Amendment's guarantee of freedom …


No Respect: Brian Leiter On Religion, Andrew Koppelman Jan 2010

No Respect: Brian Leiter On Religion, Andrew Koppelman

Faculty Working Papers

In two recent papers, Brian Leiter argues that there is no good reason for law to single out religion for special treatment, and that religion is not an apt candidate for respect in the "thick" sense of being an object of favorable appraisal. Both arguments depend on a radically impoverished conception of what religion is and what it does. In this paper, I explain what Leiter leaves out, and offer an hypothesis about why. I also engage with some related reflections by Simon Blackburn and Timothy Macklem, both of whom influence, in different ways, Leiter's analysis.


How Shall I Praise Thee? Brian Leiter On Respect For Religion, Andrew Koppelman Jan 2010

How Shall I Praise Thee? Brian Leiter On Respect For Religion, Andrew Koppelman

Faculty Working Papers

In two recent papers, Brian Leiter argues that there is no good reason for law to single out religion for special treatment, and that religion is not an apt candidate for respect in the "thick" sense of being an object of favorable appraisal. Both arguments depend on a radically impoverished conception of what religion is and what it does. In this paper, I explain what Leiter leaves out, and offer an hypothesis about why. I also engage with some related reflections by Simon Blackburn and Timothy Macklem, both of whom influence, in different ways, Leiter's analysis.


Public And Private As Viewed Through The Work Of The Muhtasib, Kristen Stilt, Roy Mottahedeh Jan 2010

Public And Private As Viewed Through The Work Of The Muhtasib, Kristen Stilt, Roy Mottahedeh

Faculty Working Papers

This article examines the distinctions between public and private space in classical Islamic law through the work of the muhtasib, a legal official charged with the inspection of public places and behavior in towns of the premodern Middle East and North Africa (and in some Muslim communities outside of these areas).


Recognizing The Individual: The Muhtasibs Of Early Mamluk Cairo And Fustat, Kristen Stilt Jan 2010

Recognizing The Individual: The Muhtasibs Of Early Mamluk Cairo And Fustat, Kristen Stilt

Faculty Working Papers

This Article studies the biographies of several key muhtasibs in Mamluk Cairo and Fustat to understand the types of individuals who held the position and how the individual background, education, status among the populace, relationship to the ruling elite, and the means of obtaining the position of each contributed to how the particular muhtasib functioned in office.


Price Setting And Hoarding In Mamluk Egypt, Kristen Stilt Jan 2010

Price Setting And Hoarding In Mamluk Egypt, Kristen Stilt

Faculty Working Papers

This Article studies the legal position of the muhtasib in medieval Cairo, using the biographical information available about the individuals who held the position to understand the actions they took in office. The muhtasib, who was an inspector of public places and markets in particular, was a key legal actor in terms of applying law immediately to a situation he encountered; he was a common face of the law in society. This Article, influenced in method by legal realism, shows that in addition to the law that a particular muhtasib intended to apply to a particular case, biographical information is …


Islamic Law And The Making And Remaking Of The Iraqi Legal System, Kristen Stilt Jan 2010

Islamic Law And The Making And Remaking Of The Iraqi Legal System, Kristen Stilt

Faculty Working Papers

This article examines the drafting process of the new Iraqi constitution, which took place in 2004 and 2005 as a result of the U.S. invasion of Iraq. It addresses the role of Islamic law in the Iraqi legal system prior to the invasion and considers how a new constitution may deal with the question and analyzes, based on Iraq's history, current situation, and the experience of other similar countries, how Islamic law may be retained or incorporated into the new Iraqi legal system. While the constitutional discussion is important, the Article also shows who debates over Islamic law in Iraq …


How Is Islam The Solution?: Constitutional Visions Of Contemporary Islamists, Kristen Stilt Jan 2010

How Is Islam The Solution?: Constitutional Visions Of Contemporary Islamists, Kristen Stilt

Faculty Working Papers

This Article uses documents issued by the Muslim Brotherhood, in particular the lengthy 2007 "Political Party" Platform, and personal interviews with Brotherhood leadership to examine the group's specific goals and beliefs for the place of religion within the structure of the Egyptian legal system. While many important angles need to be explored, I focus on one topic that has drawn the most attention to the Brotherhood, the place of religion in the state, or religion defined and enforced by state institutions. I show that the Brotherhood carefully acknowledges the existing constitutional structure and jurisprudence on the position of Islam in …


Elusive Equality: The Armenian Genocide And The Failure Of Ottoman Legal Reform, Mark L. Movsesian Jan 2010

Elusive Equality: The Armenian Genocide And The Failure Of Ottoman Legal Reform, Mark L. Movsesian

Faculty Publications

I would like to thank the organizers for inviting me to deliver some remarks this morning. By way of background, I am not a historian or genocide scholar, but a law professor with an interest in comparative law and religion. Comparative law and religion is a relatively new field. It explores how different legal regimes reflect, and influence, the relationships that religious communities have with the state and with each other. My recent work compares Islamic and Christian conceptions of law, a subject that has engaged Muslims and Christians since their first encounters in the seventh century.

When I approach …


Fiqh And Canons: Reflections On Islamic And Christian Jurisprudence, Mark L. Movsesian Jan 2010

Fiqh And Canons: Reflections On Islamic And Christian Jurisprudence, Mark L. Movsesian

Faculty Publications

Although American scholarship has begun to address both Christian and Islamic jurisprudence in a serious way, virtually none of the literature attempts to compare the place of law in these two world religions. This Essay begins to compare Islamic and Christian conceptions of law and suggests some implications for contemporary debates about religious dispute settlement. Islam and Christianity are subtle and complex religions. Each has competing strands; each has evolved over millennia and expressed itself differently over time. Moreover, although systematic treatments of Islamic law are beginning to appear in English, much remains available only in languages, like Arabic, that …


Religious Liberty After Gonzales: A Look At State Rfras, Christopher C. Lund Jan 2010

Religious Liberty After Gonzales: A Look At State Rfras, Christopher C. Lund

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Exploring Free Exercise Doctrine: Equal Liberty And Religious Exemptions, Christopher C. Lund Jan 2010

Exploring Free Exercise Doctrine: Equal Liberty And Religious Exemptions, Christopher C. Lund

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Government Identity Speech And Religion: Establishment Clause Limits After Summum, 19 Wm. & Mary Bill Rts. J. 1 (2010), Mary Jean Dolan Jan 2010

Government Identity Speech And Religion: Establishment Clause Limits After Summum, 19 Wm. & Mary Bill Rts. J. 1 (2010), Mary Jean Dolan

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

This Article offers in-depth analysis of the opinions in Pleasant Grove v. Summum. Summum is a significant case because it expands "government speech" to cover broad, thematic government identity messages in the form of donated monuments, including the much-litigated Fraternal Order of Eagles-donated Ten Commandments. The Article explores the fine distinctions between the new "government speech doctrine"- a defense in Free Speech Clause cases that allows government to express its own viewpoint and to reject alternative views-and "government speech" analyzed under the Establishment Clause, which prohibits government from expressing a viewpoint on religion, and from favoring some religions over others. …


Insubstantial Burdens: The Case For Government Employee Exemptions To Same-Sex Marriage Laws, Robin Fretwell Wilson Jan 2010

Insubstantial Burdens: The Case For Government Employee Exemptions To Same-Sex Marriage Laws, Robin Fretwell Wilson

Scholarly Articles

The case for accommodating religious objectors to same-sex marriage has met significant resistance on a number of fronts. Some believe that religious exemptions permit objectors to dodge legal duties to serve same-sex couples that would otherwise apply. Critics charge that, if extended to public employees, such exemptions would burden the ability of same-sex couples to marry. Others argue that exemptions coddle wrong-headed people who really do not have a legitimate reason for objecting and who, therefore, should not be legally excused. A review of the nearly half-dozen new same-sex marriage laws enacted in the past year suggests that the least …


Love, Truth And The Economy: A Reflection On Benedict Xvi's Caritas In Veritate, John M. Breen Jan 2010

Love, Truth And The Economy: A Reflection On Benedict Xvi's Caritas In Veritate, John M. Breen

Faculty Publications & Other Works

No abstract provided.


Laïcité In Comparative Perspective (Conference): Foreword, Mark L. Movsesian Jan 2010

Laïcité In Comparative Perspective (Conference): Foreword, Mark L. Movsesian

Faculty Publications

On June 11, 2010, the Center for Law and Religion at St. John's University School of Law held its inaugural event, an academic conference at the University's Paris campus. "Laïcité in Comparative Perspective" brought together scholars from the United States and Europe to explore the French concept of laïcité and compare it with models of church-state relations in other countries, particularly the United States. Participants included Douglas Laycock (University of Virginia), who offered the Conference Introduction; Nathalie Caron (Université Paris-Est Créteil); Blandine Chelini-Pont (Université Paul Cézanne Aix-Marseille); Nina Crimm (St. John's University); Marc DeGirolami (St. John's University); Javier Martínez-Torrón Universidad …