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2009

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Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Law

How The Dissent Becomes The Majority: Using Federalism To Transform Coalitions In The U.S. Supreme Court, Vanessa Baird, Tonja Jacobi Nov 2009

How The Dissent Becomes The Majority: Using Federalism To Transform Coalitions In The U.S. Supreme Court, Vanessa Baird, Tonja Jacobi

Duke Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Status And Future Of Government Documents, James T. Shaw Oct 2009

The Status And Future Of Government Documents, James T. Shaw

Criss Library Faculty Proceedings & Presentations

Depository libraries have traditionally enjoyed a pretty sweet deal—we receive free copies of documents in return for space, processing, and staff to help people use them. Depository libraries have served as key players in two areas of public policy: 1) public access to government information for the needs of today; and 2) widespread distribution of documents helps them survive to form a historical record.


Conceptualizing Aggression, Noah Weisbord Oct 2009

Conceptualizing Aggression, Noah Weisbord

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law

No abstract provided.


Flexible Work Arrangements: Improving Job Quality And Workforce Stability For Low-Wage Workers And Their Employers, Jessica Glenn, Liz Watson Sep 2009

Flexible Work Arrangements: Improving Job Quality And Workforce Stability For Low-Wage Workers And Their Employers, Jessica Glenn, Liz Watson

Published Reports

In 2009, workers and their families across the country felt the impact of serious economic downturn, with unemployment reaching a 26-year high. While recent news suggests things may be improving, we cannot forget that for many low-wage and hourly workers -- who now represent over a quarter of the U.S. workforce -- the recession only exacerbated their ongoing struggle to hold down quality jobs while caring for their families.

Low-wage workers face many of the same challenges that the rest of us face in reconciling our work, family and personal lives, but for many of these workers, it's simply a …


Enabling Responsible Public Genomics, John M. Conley, Daniel B. Vorhaus, Adam K. Doerr Aug 2009

Enabling Responsible Public Genomics, John M. Conley, Daniel B. Vorhaus, Adam K. Doerr

John M Conley

As scientific understandings of genetics advance, researchers require increasingly rich datasets that combine genomic data from large numbers of individuals with medical and other personal information. Linking individuals’ genetic data and personal information precludes anonymity and produces medically significant information—a result not contemplated by the established legal and ethical conventions governing human genomic research. To pursue the next generation of human genomic research and commerce in a responsible fashion, scientists, lawyers, and regulators must address substantial new issues, including researchers’ duties with respect to clinically significant data, the boundary between genomic research and commerce and the practice of medicine, and …


Slides: Water Leasing In The Lower Arkansas Valley: The "Super Ditch Company", Peter Nichols Jun 2009

Slides: Water Leasing In The Lower Arkansas Valley: The "Super Ditch Company", Peter Nichols

Western Water Law, Policy and Management: Ripples, Currents, and New Channels for Inquiry (Martz Summer Conference, June 3-5)

Presenter: Peter NIchols, Trout, Raley, Montano, Witwer & Freeman, Denver, CO

28 slides


Unlearning Fear Out-Group Others, Terry A. Maroney Apr 2009

Unlearning Fear Out-Group Others, Terry A. Maroney

Law and Contemporary Problems

Maroney describes a neuroscientific fear-extinction study as preliminary evidence supporting the notion that out-group hostilities might be influenced by biological predispositions. In the fear-extinction study, subjects were conditioned to fear the presentation of black or white faces with the introduction of an electric shock when such faces appeared on a screen. Then the experimenters stopped using the shock when that race's faces appeared on the screen. Subjects' fear was extinguished much more effectively when the subject was conditioned to fear faces of individuals of her own race than when the subject was conditioned to fear faces of individuals of another …


Policy Coordination: The Solicitor General As Amicus Curiae In The First Two Years Of The Roberts Court, Ryan Juliano Apr 2009

Policy Coordination: The Solicitor General As Amicus Curiae In The First Two Years Of The Roberts Court, Ryan Juliano

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Saving Face: The Benefits Of Not Saying I’M Sorry, Brent T. White Apr 2009

Saving Face: The Benefits Of Not Saying I’M Sorry, Brent T. White

Law and Contemporary Problems

White discusses the socio-psychological research that suggests humans invest significant emotional stake in "face"--or their "claimed identity as a competent, intelligent, or moral persons"--and apologize only when they can do so without significant "face threat." Criminal offenders, many of whom are likely to be low on self-determination, may resist apology to victims out of psychological fragility and the psychological need to preserve face rather than lack of remorse. Thus, the criminal-justice system should be cautious about punishing offenders more harshly because they fail to show external remorse--or even when they are openly defiant. This caution should be exercised whether the …


Are Empiricists Asking The Right Questions About Judicial Decisionmaking?, Jack Knight Apr 2009

Are Empiricists Asking The Right Questions About Judicial Decisionmaking?, Jack Knight

Duke Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Are Appointed Judges Strategic Too?, Joanna M. Shepherd Apr 2009

Are Appointed Judges Strategic Too?, Joanna M. Shepherd

Duke Law Journal

The conventional wisdom among many legal scholars is that judicial independence can best be achieved with an appointive judiciary; judicial elections turn judges into politicians, threatening judicial autonomy. Yet the original supporters of judicial elections successfully eliminated the appointive systems of many states by arguing that judges who owed their jobs to politicians could never be truly independent. Because the judiciary could function as a check and balance on the other governmental branches only if it truly were independent of them, the reformers reasoned that only popular elections could ensure a truly independent judiciary. Using a data set of virtually …


Predicting Court Outcomes Through Political Preferences: The Japanese Supreme Court And The Chaos Of 1993, J. Mark Ramseyer Apr 2009

Predicting Court Outcomes Through Political Preferences: The Japanese Supreme Court And The Chaos Of 1993, J. Mark Ramseyer

Duke Law Journal

Empiricists routinely explain politically sensitive decisions of the U.S. federal courts through the party of the executive or legislature appointing the judge. That they can do so reflects the fundamental independence of the courts. After all, appointment politics will predict judicial outcomes only when judges are independent of sitting politicians. Because Japanese Supreme Court justices enjoy an independence similar to that of U.S. federal judges, I use judicial outcomes to ask whether Japanese premiers from different parties have appointed justices with different political preferences. Although the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) governed Japan for most of the postwar period, it temporarily …


Advancing The Study Of Violence Against Women: Response To Commentaries And Next Steps, Carol E. Jordan Apr 2009

Advancing The Study Of Violence Against Women: Response To Commentaries And Next Steps, Carol E. Jordan

Office for Policy Studies on Violence Against Women Publications

No abstract provided.


Never Being Able To Say You’Re Sorry: Barriers To Apology By Leaders In Group Conflicts, Roger Conner, Patricia Jordan Apr 2009

Never Being Able To Say You’Re Sorry: Barriers To Apology By Leaders In Group Conflicts, Roger Conner, Patricia Jordan

Law and Contemporary Problems

Conner and Jordan discuss three implications of the foregoing analysis for leaders, peacemakers, and scholars interested in apology as an instrument to advance justice, prevent destructive conflict, and promote cooperation. First, an effective apology is likely to occur only after other changes have "softened up" negative attitudes between the groups--referred to here as "ripeness." Second, even with a degree of ripeness, apology is unlikely without a "window of opportunity," a confluence of circumstances that permits the leader to limit the scope of the apology so as not to concede too much. Third, even if these conditions are satisfied, words alone …


Can Effective Apology Emerge Through Litigation?, Alphonse A. Gerhardstein Apr 2009

Can Effective Apology Emerge Through Litigation?, Alphonse A. Gerhardstein

Law and Contemporary Problems

Gerhardstein provides a number of examples in which the factors identified by Roger Conner and Patricia Jordan--ripeness, a window of opportunity, and a symbolic act or gesture--came together to facilitate apology by a public leader. But he doesn't think that the window of opportunity needs to be exogenously determined. Rather, advocates can, through litigation and settlement demands, create that window. He believes that apology by public officials can do more to promote healthy civic society than can mere monetary settlement.


Examining The Applicability Of The Concepts Of Apology, Forgiveness, And Reconciliation To Multi-Stakeholder, Collaborative Problem-Solving Processes, Jennifer Pratt Miles Apr 2009

Examining The Applicability Of The Concepts Of Apology, Forgiveness, And Reconciliation To Multi-Stakeholder, Collaborative Problem-Solving Processes, Jennifer Pratt Miles

Law and Contemporary Problems

In 2004, Meridian Institute, an organization with expertise in designing, facilitating, and mediating collaborative problem-solving processes, was asked to assess the feasibility of forming collaborative, community-based-watershed groups in northern New Mexico to develop plans to address water-quality problems and--if determined to be feasible--to facilitate the formation of those groups and plans. Early in the assessment process it became clear that the historical context was critically important and was one of the factors that had to be addressed. Here, Miles explores the applicability of apology, forgiveness, and reconciliation to a collaborative group process that can be examined through the example of …


The “Hidden Judiciary”: An Empirical Examination Of Executive Branch Justice, Chris Guthrie, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Andrew J. Wistrich Apr 2009

The “Hidden Judiciary”: An Empirical Examination Of Executive Branch Justice, Chris Guthrie, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Andrew J. Wistrich

Duke Law Journal

Administrative law judges attract little scholarly attention, yet they decide a large fraction of all civil disputes. In this Article, we demonstrate that these executive branch judges, like their counterparts in the judicial branch, tend to make predominantly intuitive rather than predominantly deliberative decisions. This finding sheds new light on executive branch justice by suggesting that judicial intuition, not judicial independence, is the most significant challenge facing these important judicial officers.


A Survery Of Western United States Instream Flow Programs And The Policies That Protect A River's Ecosystem, Kyle Jackson Apr 2009

A Survery Of Western United States Instream Flow Programs And The Policies That Protect A River's Ecosystem, Kyle Jackson

Department of Environmental Studies: Undergraduate Student Theses

The Western United States can best be described as a vast, varying land, with the high plains to the east and the jagged horizons of Rockies to the west. However there is one common trait shared by these states: the lack of water resources. With the continued development of this land, the fact that water is scarce is becoming more real. This issue became more difficult to handle as the public became more aware that many competing uses existed for the finite resource, and those different uses were degrading the natural environments of the surface waters. With this realization instream …


Benefits Of Integrated Programs Over Non-Integrated Programs, Rebecca Flanagan Jan 2009

Benefits Of Integrated Programs Over Non-Integrated Programs, Rebecca Flanagan

Faculty Publications

I do see hybrid teaching as the ASP model of the future. It is not a method that will be adopted by all schools, and it will certainly take time, and analysis, to refine the model to fit the student and school culture. Success is always a work in progress, but can only be achieved once you step from your comfort zone and try a new method.


Research In International Commercial Arbitration: Special Skills, Special Sources, S. I. Strong Jan 2009

Research In International Commercial Arbitration: Special Skills, Special Sources, S. I. Strong

Faculty Publications

Experts agree that international commercial arbitration relies far more heavily on written advocacy than litigation does, yet very few practitioners and arbitrators have ever received any specialized training in how to research and present written arguments in this unique area of law. Newcomers to the field are particularly disadvantaged, since the legal authorities used in international commercial arbitration are unique and novices often do not know how to find certain materials, if they are even aware that these items exist. This article helps deepen the understanding of the practice of international commercial arbitration by describing how experienced international advocates and …


A Discourse On The Public Nature Of Research In Contemporary Life Science: A Law-Policy Proposal To Promote The Public Nature Of Science In An Era Of Academia-Industry Integration, Michael J. Malinowski Jan 2009

A Discourse On The Public Nature Of Research In Contemporary Life Science: A Law-Policy Proposal To Promote The Public Nature Of Science In An Era Of Academia-Industry Integration, Michael J. Malinowski

Journal Articles

This article addresses the impact of integration of academia, industry, and government on the public nature of research. The article concludes that, while the integration has benefited science immensely, regulatory measures should be taken to restore the public nature of research in an age of integration.


Constructing A Legal And Managerial Paradigm Applicable To The Modern-Day Safety And Security Challenge At Colleges And Universities, Oren R. Griffin Jan 2009

Constructing A Legal And Managerial Paradigm Applicable To The Modern-Day Safety And Security Challenge At Colleges And Universities, Oren R. Griffin

Articles, Chapters in Books and Other Contributions to Scholarly Works

This Article focuses on campus safety and security in higher education. In light of the numerous stakeholders in higher education that include faculty, law enforcement professionals, higher education lawyers, state and federal officials, and institutional administrators, this Article examines legal and policy considerations that should influence how colleges and universities respond to protect the campus community and safeguard the educational environment. In particular, the Article discusses the Incident Command System and the impact this management approach has had on the development of an organizational framework to manage emergency incidents. The Article also reviews selected case law regarding campus safety and …


Regulating Conflicts Of Interest In Research: The Paper Tiger Needs Real Teeth, Jesse A. Goldner Jan 2009

Regulating Conflicts Of Interest In Research: The Paper Tiger Needs Real Teeth, Jesse A. Goldner

Saint Louis University Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Beyond Bidil: The Expanding Embrace Of Race In Biomedical Research And Product Development, Jonathan Kahn Jan 2009

Beyond Bidil: The Expanding Embrace Of Race In Biomedical Research And Product Development, Jonathan Kahn

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Pharmacogenomics And The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act Of 2008: Legislation Limitations And Its Impact On Pgx Research And Clinical Opportunity, Amanda Tessmer Jan 2009

Pharmacogenomics And The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act Of 2008: Legislation Limitations And Its Impact On Pgx Research And Clinical Opportunity, Amanda Tessmer

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Pitfalls In Patenting Publicly Funded Research - Comments On Draft South African Regulations, Matthew Herder, Cynthia M. Ho Jan 2009

Pitfalls In Patenting Publicly Funded Research - Comments On Draft South African Regulations, Matthew Herder, Cynthia M. Ho

Articles, Book Chapters, & Popular Press

South Africa recently enacted legislation similar to the US. Bayh-Dole Act, which permits publicly funded institutions to obtain patent rights in hopes that the patent incentive will foster commercialization, as well as generate revenues to the funded institutions and scientists. While enacting analogs to Bayh-Dole seems presently in vogue, there are definitely concerned about the original legislation that have been voiced. When South Africa recently published proposed guidelines implementing its version of Bayh-Dole, it broadly opened up the opportunity for public comments. The attached paper discusses some of concerns, including problems with delaying timely knowledge dissemination and the need to …