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Full-Text Articles in Law

Fraud Is Fun: Or How A Foreclosure Rescue Scam Changed My Life, Peter A. Holland Oct 2009

Fraud Is Fun: Or How A Foreclosure Rescue Scam Changed My Life, Peter A. Holland

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Putting Community Equity In Community Development: Resident Equity Participation In Urban Redevelopment, Barbara Bezdek Jan 2009

Putting Community Equity In Community Development: Resident Equity Participation In Urban Redevelopment, Barbara Bezdek

Faculty Scholarship

The special concern of this paper is to recalibrate the benefits and burdens of public-private partnerships as they remake inner city neighborhoods, by braking the rate at which urban land is being reclaimed from low-wealth residents by local government practices to disperse occupants, sweeping aside their tangible and intangible capital. Public oversight requirements have not kept pace with the dispossession, yet the costs that these development decisions impose on the social fabric of communities rend the shared networks necessary to residents’ abilities to meet basic social needs. This destruction of low-wealth communities is a form of equity-stripping, produced by local ...


The Background Principles And Core Contents Of The Real Right Law Of The People's Republic Of China, Zhu Yan Jan 2009

The Background Principles And Core Contents Of The Real Right Law Of The People's Republic Of China, Zhu Yan

Maryland Series in Contemporary Asian Studies

No abstract provided.


Regulatory Takings: A Chronicle Of The Construction Of A Constitutional Concept, Garrett Power Jan 2009

Regulatory Takings: A Chronicle Of The Construction Of A Constitutional Concept, Garrett Power

Faculty Scholarship

In the American constitutional system the sovereign has the power to enact “regulations which are necessary to the common good and general welfare.” But the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution proscribes that : “No person shall be . . . deprived of . . . property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.” And the question of whether a sovereign regulation has “taken” private property without just compensation has puzzled the United States Supreme Court for over two hundred years in over four hundred cases. This paper chronicles the leading cases and finds that the ...