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2009

Cornell University Law School

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Articles 1 - 30 of 185

Full-Text Articles in Law

U.S. Chamber Of Commerce Liability Survey: Inaccurate, Unfair, And Bad For Business, Theodore Eisenberg Dec 2009

U.S. Chamber Of Commerce Liability Survey: Inaccurate, Unfair, And Bad For Business, Theodore Eisenberg

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce uses its Survey of State Liability to criticize judiciaries and seek legal change but no detailed evaluation of the survey’s quality exists. This article presents evidence that the survey is substantively inaccurate and methodologically flawed. It incorrectly characterizes state law; respondents provide less than 10 percent correct answers for objectively verifiable responses. It is internally inconsistent; a state threatened with judicial hellhole status ranked first in the survey while venues not on the list ranked lower. The absence of correlation between survey rankings and observable activity suggests that other factors drive the rankings. Two factors …


Untold Truths: The Exclusion Of Enforced Sterilizations From The Peruvian Truth Commission's Final Report, Jocelyn E. Getgen Nov 2009

Untold Truths: The Exclusion Of Enforced Sterilizations From The Peruvian Truth Commission's Final Report, Jocelyn E. Getgen

Cornell Law School Berger International Speaker Papers

This presentation argues that the exclusion of enforced sterilization cases from the Peruvian Truth Commission's investigation and Final Report effectively erases State responsibility and decreases the likelihood for justice and reparations for women victims-survivors of State-sponsored violence in Peru. In a context of deep cultural and economic divides and violent conflict, this presentation recounts how the State's Family Planning Program violated Peruvian women's reproductive rights by sterilizing low-income, indigenous Quechua-speaking women without informed consent. This presentation argues that these systematic reproductive injustices constitute an act of genocide, proposes an independent inquiry, and advocates for a more inclusive investigation and final …


Condemning Religion: Rluipa And The Politics Of Eminent Domain, Christopher Serkin, Nelson Tebbe Nov 2009

Condemning Religion: Rluipa And The Politics Of Eminent Domain, Christopher Serkin, Nelson Tebbe

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Should religious landowners enjoy special protection from eminent domain? A recent federal statute, the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA), compels courts to apply a compelling interest test to zoning and landmarking regulations that substantially burden religiously owned property. That provision has been controversial in itself, but today a new cutting-edge issue is emerging: whether the Act’s extraordinary protection should extend to condemnation as well. The matter has taken on added significance in the wake of Kelo, where the Supreme Court reaffirmed its expansive view of the eminent domain power. In this Article, we argue that RLUIPA should …


Attorneys’ Fees And Expenses In Class Action Settlements: 1993-2008, Theodore Eisenberg, Geoffrey P. Miller Oct 2009

Attorneys’ Fees And Expenses In Class Action Settlements: 1993-2008, Theodore Eisenberg, Geoffrey P. Miller

Cornell Law Faculty Working Papers

We report on a comprehensive data base of eighteen years of published opinions (1993-2008, inclusive) on settlements in class action and shareholder derivative cases in both state and federal courts. An earlier study, covering1993-2002 , revealed a remarkable relationship between attorneys’ fees and the size of class recovery: regardless of the methodology for calculating fees ostensibly employed by the courts, the overwhelmingly important determinant of the fee was simply the size of the recovery obtained by the class. The present study, which nearly doubles the number of cases in the data base, powerfully confirms that relationship. Fees display the same …


Placeholders: Engaging The Hayekian Critique Of Financial Regulation, Annelise Riles Oct 2009

Placeholders: Engaging The Hayekian Critique Of Financial Regulation, Annelise Riles

Cornell Law Faculty Working Papers

Since Friedrich Hayek, debates about the proper relationship between the state and the market, and about the optimal design of regulatory institutions, often turn on assumptions about the workings of legal expertise — and in particular about the difference between public expertise (bureaucratic knowledge) and private expertise (private law). Hayek’s central argument, adopted uncritically by a wide array of policy-makers and academics across the political spectrum, is a temporal one: bureaucratic reasoning is inherently one step behind the market, and hence effective market planning is impossible. In contrast, Hayek argues, private ordering is superior because it is of the moment, …


Waste No Land: Property, Dignity And Growth In Urbanizing China, Eva M. Pils Oct 2009

Waste No Land: Property, Dignity And Growth In Urbanizing China, Eva M. Pils

Cornell Law Faculty Working Papers

The Chinese state does not allow rural collectives to sell land, but takes land from them and makes it available on the urban property market. While rural land rights are thus easily obliterated, the newly created urban rights in what used to be rural land enjoy legal protection. The state justifies these land takings by the need for urbanization and economic growth. The takings have resulted in an impressive contribution of the construction and property sector to state revenue and GDP growth, but also in unfairness toward peasants evicted from their land and homes. The example discussed here shows that …


A Simple Theory Of Takeover Regulation In The United States And Europe, Guido Ferrarini, Geoffrey P. Miller Oct 2009

A Simple Theory Of Takeover Regulation In The United States And Europe, Guido Ferrarini, Geoffrey P. Miller

Cornell International Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Death Is Different And A Refugee’S Right To Counsel, John R. Mills, Kristen M. Echemendia, Stephen Yale-Loehr Oct 2009

Death Is Different And A Refugee’S Right To Counsel, John R. Mills, Kristen M. Echemendia, Stephen Yale-Loehr

Cornell International Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Regulate Otc Derivatives By Deregulating Them, Lynn A. Stout Oct 2009

Regulate Otc Derivatives By Deregulating Them, Lynn A. Stout

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

When credit markets froze up in the fall of 2008, many economists pronounced the crisis inexplicable and unforeseeable. Lawyers who specialize in financial regulation, and especially the small cadre who specialize in derivatives regulation, knew better.That's because the roots of the catastrophe lay not in changes in the markets, but changes in the law. In particular, the credit crisis can be traced to Congress's 2000 passage of the Commodity Futures Modernization Act, which radically altered the traditional legal approach to financial derivatives.

This shift in the legal treatment of financial derivatives has brought the banking system to its knees. The …


Accountability And The Commission On The Limits Of The Continental Shelf: Deciding Who Owns The Ocean Floor, Anna Cavnar Oct 2009

Accountability And The Commission On The Limits Of The Continental Shelf: Deciding Who Owns The Ocean Floor, Anna Cavnar

Cornell International Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Paradox Of Commercial Real Estate Debt, Georgette Chapman Phillips Oct 2009

The Paradox Of Commercial Real Estate Debt, Georgette Chapman Phillips

Cornell International Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Sino-Japanese Cooperation In The East China Sea: A Lasting Arrangement, Alexander M. Peterson Oct 2009

Sino-Japanese Cooperation In The East China Sea: A Lasting Arrangement, Alexander M. Peterson

Cornell International Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Beyond The Employee Free Choice Act: Unleashing The States In Labor-Management Relations Policy, Henry H. Drummonds Oct 2009

Beyond The Employee Free Choice Act: Unleashing The States In Labor-Management Relations Policy, Henry H. Drummonds

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Trawling Dna Databases For Partial Matches: What Is The Fbi Afraid Of, David H. Kaye Oct 2009

Trawling Dna Databases For Partial Matches: What Is The Fbi Afraid Of, David H. Kaye

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


The Military And The Law Elite, Dennis Jacobs Oct 2009

The Military And The Law Elite, Dennis Jacobs

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Policing The Good Guys: Regulation Of The Charitable Sector Through A Federal Charity Oversight Board, Terri Lynn Helge Oct 2009

Policing The Good Guys: Regulation Of The Charitable Sector Through A Federal Charity Oversight Board, Terri Lynn Helge

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Propensity Or Stereotype: A Misguided Evidence Experiment In Indian Country, Aviva Orenstein Oct 2009

Propensity Or Stereotype: A Misguided Evidence Experiment In Indian Country, Aviva Orenstein

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Kendra’S Law And The Rights Of The Mentally Ill: An Empirical Peek Behind The Courts’ Legal Analysis And A Suggested Template For The New York State Legislature’S Reconsideration For Renewal In 2010, Kathryn A. Worthington Oct 2009

Kendra’S Law And The Rights Of The Mentally Ill: An Empirical Peek Behind The Courts’ Legal Analysis And A Suggested Template For The New York State Legislature’S Reconsideration For Renewal In 2010, Kathryn A. Worthington

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Lessening Cumulative Burdens On The Right To Vote: A Legislative Response To Crawford V. Marion County Election Board, Neil P. Kelly Oct 2009

Lessening Cumulative Burdens On The Right To Vote: A Legislative Response To Crawford V. Marion County Election Board, Neil P. Kelly

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Hope In The Law, Annelise Riles Oct 2009

Hope In The Law, Annelise Riles

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Solar Rights, Sara C. Bronin Oct 2009

Solar Rights, Sara C. Bronin

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The rights to access and to harness the rays of the sun - solar rights - are extremely valuable. These rights can determine whether and how an individual can take advantage of the sun’s light, warmth, or energy, and they can have significant economic consequences. Accordingly, for at least two thousand years, people have attempted to assign solar rights in a fair and efficient manner. In the United States, attempts to assign solar rights have fallen short. A quarter century ago, numerous American legal scholars debated this deficiency. They agreed that this country lacked a coherent legal framework for the …


Regulate Otc Derivatives By Deregulating Them: Response To Comments, Lynn A. Stout Oct 2009

Regulate Otc Derivatives By Deregulating Them: Response To Comments, Lynn A. Stout

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Response to comments by Jean Helwege, Peter Wallison, and Craig Pirrong on the author's article, "Regulate OTC Derivatives By Deregulating Them." Article predates the author's affiliation with Cornell Law School.


Strategery's Refuge, Christopher W. Seeds Oct 2009

Strategery's Refuge, Christopher W. Seeds

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

By popular account, the Supreme Court’s recent decisions on effective assistance of counsel in capital sentencing—aggressive critiques of counsel’s failure to investigate and present mitigating evidence—initiate an era of improved oversight of the quality of legal representation in death penalty cases. One would expect the new and improved jurisprudence to curb post hoc efforts by trial counsel to disguise incomplete trial preparation as a tactical decision, a practice that has long undercut the Strickland doctrine. But the shelters for post hoc rationalizations—the refuges for “strategery”—remain. Surveying decisions of the federal courts of appeals since the turn of the century, this …


Justice In Time, Robert C. Hockett Sep 2009

Justice In Time, Robert C. Hockett

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Challenges raised by the subject of intergenerational justice seem often to be thought almost uniquely intractable. In particular, apparent conflicts between the core values of impartiality and efficiency raised by a large and still growing number of intertemporal impossibility results derived by Koopmans, Diamond, Basu & Mitra, and others have been taken to foreclose fruitful policy assessment done with a view to the distant future.

This Essay aims to dispel the sense of bewilderment, pessimism and attendant paralysis that afflicts intertemporal justice assessment. It works toward that end by demonstrating that the most vexing puzzles raised by questions of intergenerational …


Maybe Dick Speidel Was Right About Court Adjustment, Robert A. Hillman Sep 2009

Maybe Dick Speidel Was Right About Court Adjustment, Robert A. Hillman

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In a symposium to honor Professor Richard Speidel, a giant in the field of contract and commercial law for over four decades, this contribution argues that Speidel may have been correct in asserting that, in limited circumstances, court adjustment of disrupted long-term contracts makes sense. I assert that nothing courts have decided or writers have analyzed since the ALCOA case proves that court adjustment is wrong-headed. But, as with so many policy issues, we may never identify the "best" judicial approach to disrupted long-term contracts because resolution depends on too many variables and unknowns.


A Jury Of One: Opinion Formation, Conformity, And Dissent On Juries, Nicole L. Waters, Valerie P. Hans Sep 2009

A Jury Of One: Opinion Formation, Conformity, And Dissent On Juries, Nicole L. Waters, Valerie P. Hans

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Approximately 6 percent of criminal juries hang. But, how many dissenters carry the jury, hang the jury, or conform to the majority’s wishes? This article examines the formation of individual verdict preferences, the impact of deliberation, and the role of the dissenter using data from nearly 3,500 jurors who decided felony cases. Jurors were asked: “If it were entirely up to you as a one-person jury, what would your verdict have been in this case?” Over one-third of jurors, privately, would have voted against their jury’s decision. Analyses identify the characteristics of jurors who dissent, and distinguish dissenters who hang …


To Whom Do We Refer When We Speak Of Obligations To "Future Generations"? Reproductive Rights And The Intergenerational Community, Sherry F. Colb Sep 2009

To Whom Do We Refer When We Speak Of Obligations To "Future Generations"? Reproductive Rights And The Intergenerational Community, Sherry F. Colb

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This Article argues that an analysis of reproductive rights in the context of future generations yields three insights. First, potential people (who may or may not come into being) do not-by any prevailing approach to morality-have a right to be created by us. They may therefore be ethically "prevented" from coming into existence with what I call the "Offspring Selection Interest" ("OSI"). Second, the OSI is often conflated with the distinct reproductive rights interest in protecting one's body against unwanted intrusion, the "Bodily Integrity Interest" ("BII"), with resulting confusion for reproductive rights discourse. And third, once we distinguish the OSI …


The Aspirational Constitution, Michael C. Dorf Sep 2009

The Aspirational Constitution, Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Attempt, Conspiracy, And Incitement To Commit Genocide, Jens David Ohlin Aug 2009

Attempt, Conspiracy, And Incitement To Commit Genocide, Jens David Ohlin

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In these brief commentaries to the U.N. Genocide Convention, I explore three criminal law modes of liability as they apply to the international crime of genocide. Part I analyzes attempt to commit genocide and uncovers a basic tension over whether attempt refers to the genocide itself (the chapeau) or the underlying offense (such as killing). Part I concludes that the tension stems from the fact that the crime of genocide itself is already inchoate in nature, since the legal requirements for the crime do not require an actual, completed genocide, in the common-sense understanding of the term, but only a …


Enhancing Enforcement Of Economic, Social And Cultural Rights Using Indicators: A Focus On The Right To Education In The Icescr, Sital Kalantry, Joycelyn E. Getgen, Steven Arrigg Koh Jul 2009

Enhancing Enforcement Of Economic, Social And Cultural Rights Using Indicators: A Focus On The Right To Education In The Icescr, Sital Kalantry, Joycelyn E. Getgen, Steven Arrigg Koh

Cornell Law Faculty Working Papers

Nearly fifteen years ago, Audrey R. Chapman emphasized the importance of ascertaining violations of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) as a means to enhance its enforcement. Today, the violations approach is even more salient given the recent adoption of the ICESCR’s Optional Protocol, a powerful tool to hold States parties accountable for violations.

Indicators are essential tools for assessing violations of economic, social and cultural rights (ESCRs) because they are often the best way to measure progressive realization. Proposed guidelines on using indicators give guidance on the content of States parties reports to treaty monitoring …