Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2008

Jurisprudence

Discipline
Institution
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 154

Full-Text Articles in Law

How Mandatory Are Mandatory Minimums? How Judges Can Avoid Imposing Mandatory Minimum Sentences, Nathan A. Greenblatt Dec 2008

How Mandatory Are Mandatory Minimums? How Judges Can Avoid Imposing Mandatory Minimum Sentences, Nathan A. Greenblatt

Nathan A Greenblatt

Mandatory minimum sentences are anathema to judges due to, it is commonly said, judges’ “utter lack of power to do anything for the exceptional defendants that move them.” In the case of Weldon Angelos, for example, U.S. District Judge Paul Cassell lamented that sentencing Mr. Angelos to 55 years in prison “is unjust, cruel, and even irrational. [The court] reluctantly concludes that it has no choice.” The Judicial Conference has consistently opposed mandatory minimum sentences for more than 50 years, because it, too, has concluded that mandatory sentences give judges no choice in sentencing. Indeed, the U.S. Sentencing Commission recently …


Paul V. The Clintons, Et Al: Fec Complicity And A Plea For Real And Present Campaign Finance Reform, Ellis Washington Dec 2008

Paul V. The Clintons, Et Al: Fec Complicity And A Plea For Real And Present Campaign Finance Reform, Ellis Washington

Ellis Washington

This Article is an analysis of current legislation, case law and election law policy regarding campaign finance disclosure rules and the need for a truly independent Federal Election Commission to efficiently enforce existing election laws. Admittedly, this article isn’t as theoretical as other scholarly works on this subject, however, since campaign finance reform is a rather complex subject, I didn’t want to get caught up in the endless minutiae of legislative and court opinion other than a general review in the context of the case at bar as well as the present state of campaign finance reform policy. I also …


Who's Your Daddy?: A Psychoanalytic Exegesis Of The Supreme Court's Recent Patent Jurisprudence, Gretchen S. Sween Dec 2008

Who's Your Daddy?: A Psychoanalytic Exegesis Of The Supreme Court's Recent Patent Jurisprudence, Gretchen S. Sween

Gretchen S. Sween

ABSTRACT Who’s Your Daddy?: A Psychoanalytic Exegesis of the Supreme Court’s Recent Patent Jurisprudence Gretchen S. Sween, Ph.D., J.D. Dechert LLP 300 W. 6th Street Suite 1850 Austin, TX 78701 gretchen.sween@dechert.com Since a new administration took office in 2001, the Supreme Court has granted certiorari in, and then decided, twelve patent cases in six years. Even more extraordinary is the Supreme Court’s remarkable consistency during this recent incursion into patent law: it has either reversed, vacated, and/or remanded Federal Circuit decisions in each instance in opinions that have been unanimous or nearly unanimous. Moreover, the Supreme Court’s rhetoric in formulating …


A Proposal For Establishing Specialized Federal And State "Takings Courts", John Martinez Nov 2008

A Proposal For Establishing Specialized Federal And State "Takings Courts", John Martinez

John Martinez

A Proposal for Establishing

Specialized Federal and State "Takings Courts"

By John Martinez, Professor of Law

S.J. Quinney College of Law

at the University of Utah

ABSTRACT

Takings doctrine is a mess. This article proposes that we just accept that -- and establish specialized federal and state "takings courts" for adjudicating takings claims.

In 1978 the United States Supreme Court confessed that takings analysis is hopelessly ad hoc. And in 2005, the Court abrogated a test for takings which it had followed for 25 years. Indeed, some scholars have even resigned themselves to embracing vagueness as a virtue in takings …


A Summary Reflection On Legal Education, Robert A. Pascal, Olivier Moreteau Nov 2008

A Summary Reflection On Legal Education, Robert A. Pascal, Olivier Moreteau

Louisiana Law Review

No abstract provided.


Happy To Be Equal, Shay Gurion Oct 2008

Happy To Be Equal, Shay Gurion

Shay Gurion

The public discourses regarding happiness are burgeoning in current times, especially in the fields of positive psychology and philosophy. However, policy oriented disciplines, such as economics and law, seem to almost suspiciously, avoid this discussion, leaving one of life's most important aspects, academically and politically, unexplored. This paper tries to fill this void by offering an explanation to why humans beings are equally happy and how does this provide us with a rational basis for human equality and a corresponding perception of human rights. The explanation offered in this paper of why people are equally happy lies greatly on the …


The Food Stays In The Kitchen: Everything I Needed To Know About Statutory Interpretation I Learned By The Time I Was Nine, Hillel Levin Oct 2008

The Food Stays In The Kitchen: Everything I Needed To Know About Statutory Interpretation I Learned By The Time I Was Nine, Hillel Levin

Hillel Levin

Based on a true story, this brief Essay begins with a proclamation by Mother, the Supreme Lawmaker, that "no food may be eaten outside the kitchen." What follows is a series of rulings by Judges--father, babysitter, grandma (a liberal jurist, of course), and others--who, using traditional tools of interpretation, eventually declare it to mean that all food may be eaten outside of the kitchen. Ultimately, the supreme lawmaker reacts and clarifies.

The piece is meant to demonstrate the following:

* We all regularly use the basic tools and modes of statutory interpretation;

* When we interpret pronouncements in real life, …


Crowning The New King: The Statutory Arbitrator And The Demise Of Judicial Review, Michael H. Leroy Oct 2008

Crowning The New King: The Statutory Arbitrator And The Demise Of Judicial Review, Michael H. Leroy

Michael H LeRoy

Judicial review of arbitration awards is highly deferential, but when does it become rubber stamping? Using original data, I find that federal courts vacated only 4.3 percent of 162 disputed awards. Nearly the same result was observed for a sub-sample of 44 employment discrimination awards under Title VII. By comparison, federal appeals courts in 2006 reversed 12.9 percent of 5,917 rulings made by civil court judges on the merits of legal claims.

Why are the rulings of Article III judges scrutinized more than the awards of citizen-arbitrators? What does this mean when companies can avoid Article III court rulings by …


The Jurisprudence Of Pleading: Rights, Rules, And Conley V. Gibson, Emily Sherwin Oct 2008

The Jurisprudence Of Pleading: Rights, Rules, And Conley V. Gibson, Emily Sherwin

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In 1957, in the case of Conley v. Gibson, the Supreme Court announced a minimal standard for the contents of a complaint under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and endorsed what has come to be known as 'notice' pleading. This article, prepared for a symposium on Conley, reviews the debate over pleading requirements that preceded the case. Unlike modern discussions of pleading, which focus on the level of factual specificity required in complaints, the pre-Conley debate was about the legal content of complaints - an question largely forgotten in the years following Conley.

The early twentieth century debate over …


Towards An Equality-Enhancing Conception Of Privacy, Jane Bailey Oct 2008

Towards An Equality-Enhancing Conception Of Privacy, Jane Bailey

Dalhousie Law Journal

Canadian jurisprudence has explicitly recognized the impact of child pornography on the privacy rights of the children abused in its production. In contrast, it has generally not analyzed other forms of harmful expression, such as hate propaganda and obscenity,to be violations of the privacy rights of those targeted. In a previous article, the author suggested that this distinction in the jurisprudence reflected the relative ease with which the privacy interests of the individual children whose abuse is documented inchild pornography meshed with the prevalent Western approach toprivacy as a negative individual liberty against intrusion. Noting the historic role that the …


Under-The-Table Overruling, Christopher J. Peters Oct 2008

Under-The-Table Overruling, Christopher J. Peters

All Faculty Scholarship

In this contribution to a Wayne Law Review symposium on the first three years of the Roberts Court, the author normatively assesses the Court's practice of "under-the-table overruling," or "underruling," in high-profile constitutional cases involving abortion, campaign-finance reform, and affirmative action. The Court "underrules" when it renders a decision that undercuts a recent precedent without admitting that it is doing so. The author contends that underruling either is not supported by, or is directly incompatible with, three common rationales for constitutional stare decisis: the noninstrumental rationale, the predictability rationale, and the legitimacy rationale. In particular, while the latter rationale - …


Something To Talk About: Is There A Charter Right To Access Government Information?, Vincent Kazmierski Oct 2008

Something To Talk About: Is There A Charter Right To Access Government Information?, Vincent Kazmierski

Dalhousie Law Journal

Can sections 2(b) and 3 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms be interpreted to protect a constitutional right of access to government information? The author argues that the constitutional principle of democracy provides a foundation for judicial recognition of such a constitutional right of access even though the inclusion ofan explicit right to access to government information was rejected during the process of drafting the Charter Given that the Supreme Court of Canada's section 2(b) and 3 jurisprudence has been informed by the principle of democracy, the application of the principle may now guide the Court to include …


Much Ado About Non-State Actors: The Vanishing Relevance Of State Affiliation In International Criminal Law, John P. Cerone Sep 2008

Much Ado About Non-State Actors: The Vanishing Relevance Of State Affiliation In International Criminal Law, John P. Cerone

John P Cerone

Much has been made recently of the deficiencies of international law in grappling with violence perpetrated by non-state actors. From transnational terrorist networks to private security contractors (PSCs), organizations that are not officially part of the apparatus of any state are increasingly engaged in protracted episodes of intense violence, giving rise to questions of accountability under international law. Does international law provide rules applicable to such conduct? Once the individual has been deemed a subject of positive international law, the requirement of state affiliation is no longer essential to analytical coherence. The issue becomes simply whether international law should directly …


The Duty Of Treatment: Human Rights And The Hiv/Aids Pandemic, Noah B. Novogrodsky Sep 2008

The Duty Of Treatment: Human Rights And The Hiv/Aids Pandemic, Noah B. Novogrodsky

Noah B Novogrodsky

This article argues that the treatment of HIV and AIDS is spawning a juridical, advocacy and enforcement revolution. The intersection of AIDS and human rights was once characterized almost exclusively by anti-discrimination and destigmatization efforts. Today, human rights advocates are demanding life-saving treatment and convincing courts and legislatures to make states pay for it. Using a comparative Constitutional law methodology that places domestic courts at the center of the struggle for HIV treatment, this article shows how the provision of AIDS medications is reframing the right to health and the implementation of socio-economic rights. First, it locates an emerging right …


Clitoridectomy And The Economics Of Islamic Marriage & Divorce Law, Ryan M. Riegg Sep 2008

Clitoridectomy And The Economics Of Islamic Marriage & Divorce Law, Ryan M. Riegg

Ryan M. Riegg

This article examines the legal and economic incentives created by the Islamic Marriage and Divorce System (“IMDS”) to develop an empirical model regarding the relative prevalence and severity of clitoridectomy practices in different Muslim societies and considers how those practices may be eliminated from an economic perspective.
Part I of the article establishes the economic link between the IMDS and clitoridectomy and compares the IMDS and the American Marriage & Divorce System (“AMDS”) in terms of their relative efficiency. Part II operationalizes and refines the basic theory outlined in Part I by creating a falsifiable model regarding the relative prevalence …


The Meaning, Measure, And Misuse Of Standards Of Review, Amanda J. Peters Sep 2008

The Meaning, Measure, And Misuse Of Standards Of Review, Amanda J. Peters

Amanda J Peters

Standards of review are critical to appellate review because they set limitations upon the appellate court's review process. In doing so, standards of review balance judicial authority, make judicial review more efficient, standardize the review process, and give notice to parties who wish to appeal their cases. However, these policies and their effects are diminished when appellate judges misuse or ignore standards of review.

This article examines the theories that led to the creation of standards of review and identifies four ways that appellate courts misuse standards of review. It analyzes over 8,000 cases from Texas and California, along with …


Into The Twilight Zone: Informing Judicial Discretion In Federal Sentencing, Mary K. Ramirez Sep 2008

Into The Twilight Zone: Informing Judicial Discretion In Federal Sentencing, Mary K. Ramirez

mary k ramirez

Into the Twilight Zone: Informing Judicial Discretion in Federal Sentencing

Recent changes in federal sentencing have shifted discretionary decision-making back to federal district court judges, while appellate courts review challenged sentences for reasonableness. Each judge brings considerable legal experience and qualifications to the bench, however, cultural experiences cannot necessarily prepare judges for the range of persons or situations they will address on the bench. Social psychologists who have studied social cognition have determined that the human brain creates categories and associations resulting in implicit biases and associations that are often unconscious or subconscious. Moreover, research suggests that such biases may …


The Global Advocate: From Ethical Anarchy To Discernable Duties, Catherine A. Rogers Sep 2008

The Global Advocate: From Ethical Anarchy To Discernable Duties, Catherine A. Rogers

Catherine A Rogers

This Article identifies the emergence of "global advocates" as an important force on the world legal stage. By definition and design, these global advocates operate in a professional “space” that is distinct from the jurisdiction in which they are licensed and stretches beyond the jurisdictional boundaries of any particular tribunal. They maneuver in the nooks and crannies, the overlap and the inconsistencies between legal systems. Legal arbitrage is a core feature of their daily practice, and perhaps one of their most essential professional skills. This detachment from their licensing jurisdiction raises fundamental questions about the origin and object of their …


Book Review Of "How Judges Think" By Richard Posner, Charles D. Kelso Sep 2008

Book Review Of "How Judges Think" By Richard Posner, Charles D. Kelso

charles D. Kelso

This review presents a concise summary of the main ideas in the book, gives it a favorable evaluation, and suggests a broader goal not fully accomplished in the book.


Curriculum Reform In Context, 1870-2008: Understanding And Overcoming The Limitations Of Contemporary Legal Education, William A. Langer Sep 2008

Curriculum Reform In Context, 1870-2008: Understanding And Overcoming The Limitations Of Contemporary Legal Education, William A. Langer

William A Langer

Curriculum Reform in Context, 1870-2008: Understanding and Overcoming the Limitations of Contemporary Legal Education

William Langer

In 2006, the law schools at Harvard and Stanford announced plans to implement innovative reforms to their traditional legal curricula. While the two law schools’ reform programs are quite different from one another, they both proceed on the premise that legal education has not kept pace with the changes that have taken place in the law, the legal profession, and the global economy over the last several decades, and that the traditional form of legal education, centered around the “case method,” has long been …


Into The Twilight Zone: Informing Judicial Discretion In Federal Sentencing, Mary K. Ramirez Sep 2008

Into The Twilight Zone: Informing Judicial Discretion In Federal Sentencing, Mary K. Ramirez

mary k ramirez

Into the Twilight Zone: Informing Judicial Discretion in Federal Sentencing

Recent changes in federal sentencing have shifted discretionary decision-making back to federal district court judges, while appellate courts review challenged sentences for reasonableness. Each judge brings considerable legal experience and qualifications to the bench, however, cultural experiences cannot necessarily prepare judges for the range of persons or situations they will address on the bench. Social psychologists who have studied social cognition have determined that the human brain creates categories and associations resulting in implicit biases and associations that are often unconscious or subconscious. Moreover, research suggests that such biases may …


Patents As Property: Conceptualizing The Exclusive Right(S) In Patent Law, Adam Mossoff Sep 2008

Patents As Property: Conceptualizing The Exclusive Right(S) In Patent Law, Adam Mossoff

Adam Mossoff

The conventional wisdom is that the definition of patents as property has been long settled: unlike land and chattels, which secure the traditional "bundle" of rights, patents secure only a negative right to exclude. In exploring the history of American patent law, this Article reveals that this claim is profoundly mistaken. For much of its history, a patent was defined by Congress and courts in the same conceptual terms as property in land and chattels, as securing the exclusive rights of possession, use and disposition. Nineteenth-century courts explicitly used this substantive conception of patents to create many longstanding legal doctrines, …


Your Mileage May Vary: A General Theory Of Legal Disclaimers, R. George Wright Sep 2008

Your Mileage May Vary: A General Theory Of Legal Disclaimers, R. George Wright

R. George Wright Professor

Disclaimers are used and litigated in a remarkable variety of legal contexts. As we see in the Establishment Clause cases and elsewhere, the value of a particular disclaimer is often deeply controversial. Yet we have thus far no general theory of legal disclaimers.

This Article finds some tendency toward the excessive use and judicial validation of legal disclaimers. The main conclusion, however, is that whether courts choose to validate a particular disclaimer or not, they should not do so on the basis of the text of the disclaimer or the clarity or conspicuousness of that text. Instead, courts should decide …


Statistical String Theory For Courts: If The Data Don't Fit..., David F. Babbel Sep 2008

Statistical String Theory For Courts: If The Data Don't Fit..., David F. Babbel

David F Babbel

The primary purpose of this article is to provide courts with an important new tool for applying the correct probability distribution to a given legal question. This tool is path-breaking and will have an extensive impact on how a wide variety of cases are decided. In areas as diverse as criminal prosecutions and civil lawsuits alleging securities fraud, courts must assess the relevance and reliability of statistical data and the inferences drawn therefrom. But, courts and expert witnesses often make mistaken assumptions about what probability distributions are appropriate for their analyses. Using the wrong probability distribution can lead to invalid …


Mr. Justice Blackstone: The Commentator On Common Pleas, Emily Kadens Aug 2008

Mr. Justice Blackstone: The Commentator On Common Pleas, Emily Kadens

EMILY KADENS

Although William Blackstone served longer as a judge on the English Court of Common Pleas than he had as the inaugural Vinerian Professor of English law at Oxford, his post-professorial legal life has been almost entirely ignored by scholars. Only one article, written almost fifty years ago and focused narrowly on legal doctrine, has offered any insight into Blackstone as a judge. And yet the subject is of great interest for two reasons. First, Blackstone was the first law professor to become a judge on an English common law court. Second, his judicial opinions provide an alternative, and arguably a …


Implications Of The Uk Companies Act 2006 For Institutional Investors And The Corporate Social Responsibility Movement, Gordon L. Clark, Eric R. W. Knight Aug 2008

Implications Of The Uk Companies Act 2006 For Institutional Investors And The Corporate Social Responsibility Movement, Gordon L. Clark, Eric R. W. Knight

Eric R Knight

Non-governmental organisations, activists, and the public-at-large hold large firms accountable on many issues including their environmental footprints and the social standards of their suppliers around the world. For those coming from European social democratic traditions, stakeholders have a legitimate voice in the affairs of the corporation especially in two-tiered governance regimes that separate supervision from management. Notwithstanding attempts to re-write their proper roles and responsibilities, the Anglo-American corporation is widely believed to be the medium for the accumulation of shareholder value.

Recently, however, a counter-argument has emerged suggesting that the UK Companies Act 2006 broke with this tradition to embrace …


An Intellectual History Of Judicial Activism, Roger Craig Green Aug 2008

An Intellectual History Of Judicial Activism, Roger Craig Green

Roger Craig Green

This Article seeks to reclaim the _term_ judicial activism by exploring the _concept_ of judicial activism that underlies it. From newsrooms to confirmation hearings, judicial activism is a uniquely popular epithet condemning judicial misconduct. One goal of this Article is to dispel misperceptions about what judicial activism actually is. Popular examples include understandings of activism as (i) any exercise of judicial review, (ii) any result with which the observer disagrees, (iii) any decision purporting to enhance individual rights, or (iv) any opinion that fails to defer to actions of elected officials.

A second project is to explain in positive terms …


Crime And Moral Condemnation, John H. Bogart Aug 2008

Crime And Moral Condemnation, John H. Bogart

John H Bogart

“Crime and Moral Condemnation” considers the relationship between enforcement of criminal law and moral condemnation of conduct by examining the enforcement of California’s feticide statute over a 50 year period in Sacramento. The article focuses in particular on the trial of Dr. T. Wah Hing, one of only three persons prosecuted during the period, and for whom a full trial transcript exists. The article suggests that abortion was not the object of widespread moral condemnation for reasons in addition to the paucity of prosecution, and that enforcement of the feticide statute was more the result of action by the California …


Gender And The Chinese Legal Profession In Historical Perspective: From Heaven And Earth To Rule Of Woman?, Mary Szto Aug 2008

Gender And The Chinese Legal Profession In Historical Perspective: From Heaven And Earth To Rule Of Woman?, Mary Szto

Mary Szto

This article first discusses the current phenomenon of women judges and male lawyers in China. Many women have joined the ranks of the Chinese judiciary because this is considered a stable job conducive to caring for one’s family, as opposed to being a lawyer, which requires business travel and heavy client entertaining. I then trace this phenomenon to ancient views of Heaven, earth, gender and law in China. In this yin/yang framework, men had primary responsibility for providing sustenance for both this life and the life to come and women were relegated to the “inner chambers”. Also, law was secondary …


State Actors Beating Children: A Call For Judicial Relief, Deana Ann Pollard Sacks Aug 2008

State Actors Beating Children: A Call For Judicial Relief, Deana Ann Pollard Sacks

Deana A Pollard

Controversy over public school corporal punishment is at an all-time high. On August 20, 2008, the Human Rights Watch/ACLU brought public attention to the issue by releasing its report on corporal punishment of children in American public schools. Lawsuits challenging this state action on constitutional grounds continue to be filed, as advocates seeking to ban school paddling refuse to accept that beating students is constitutionally permissible, despite their repeated losses in the federal courts, and the Supreme Court’s refusal to consider the issue again on June 23, 2008. Ignoring the uproar, nearly half of the United States continue to employ …