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2008

Internet

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Full-Text Articles in Law

When The Schoolhouse Gate Extends Online: Student Free Speech In The Internet Age., David J. Fryman Dec 2008

When The Schoolhouse Gate Extends Online: Student Free Speech In The Internet Age., David J. Fryman

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


States, Markets, And Gatekeepers: Public-Private Regulatory Regimes In An Era Of Economic Globalization, Christopher M. Bruner Oct 2008

States, Markets, And Gatekeepers: Public-Private Regulatory Regimes In An Era Of Economic Globalization, Christopher M. Bruner

Scholarly Works

This paper illuminates the spectrum of international economic regimes through discussion of an under-theorized regulatory structure in which traditional distinctions between state and market, public and private power, hard and soft law, and international and domestic policy realms, essentially collapse - the public-private gatekeeper.

Specifically, I examine striking similarities between global bond markets and e-commerce markets through comparison of entities regulating admission to them - the dominant credit rating agencies (Standard & Poor's and Moody's), and the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Following anexamination of the development of these markets and the global regulatory power exercised by …


Rethinking "Reasonable Efforts" To Protect Trade Secrets In A Digital World, Elizabeth Rowe Sep 2008

Rethinking "Reasonable Efforts" To Protect Trade Secrets In A Digital World, Elizabeth Rowe

Elizabeth A Rowe

The very technological tools in use today that increase the efficiency with which companies do business create challenges for trade secret protection. They make trade secrets easier to store, easier to access, easier to disseminate, and more portable, thus increasing the risks that trade secrets will be destroyed. While secrecy is the sine qua non of trade secret protection, it can be difficult to accomplish. There is a tension between the need to keep information secret and modern technological methods that allow the information to be easily accessed, reproduced, and disseminated. In trade secret misappropriation cases, courts evaluate the sufficiency …


Guiding The Censor’S Scissors: A Framework To Assess Internet Filtering, Derek E. Bambauer Aug 2008

Guiding The Censor’S Scissors: A Framework To Assess Internet Filtering, Derek E. Bambauer

Derek Bambauer

While China’s Internet censorship receives considerable attention, censorship in the United States and other democratic countries is largely ignored. The Internet is increasingly fragmented by states’ different value judgments about what content is unacceptable. States differ not in their intent to censor material – from political dissent in Iran to copyrighted songs in America – but in the content they target, how precisely they block it, and how involved their citizens are in these choices. Previous scholars have analyzed Internet censorship from various values-based perspectives, and have sporadically addressed key principles such as openness, transparency, narrowness, and accountability in evaluating …


Parental Rights In Myspace: Reconceptualizing The State’S Parens Patriae Role In The Digital Age, Sheerin N. Shahinpoor Aug 2008

Parental Rights In Myspace: Reconceptualizing The State’S Parens Patriae Role In The Digital Age, Sheerin N. Shahinpoor

Sheerin N. Shahinpoor

The law grants parents a great deal of leeway in their child-rearing decisions, including choices in the context of their children’s internet use. But there is a harm about which many parents and state and federal governments are unaware: reputational harm. Children and teenagers’ current internet use put them at risk of permanently harming their reputations, and there are no protective measures in place, whether educational or regulatory. They are posting personal information on the internet at an alarming rate mostly via social networking sites like MySpace.com and Facebook.com without an awareness of the present and long-term consequences, such as …


Accidental Privacy Spills, James Grimmelmann Jul 2008

Accidental Privacy Spills, James Grimmelmann

James Grimmelmann

The realm of privacy law has more crimes than criminals, more wrongs than wrongdoers. Some invasions of privacy are neither intentional nor negligent; it's easy to recognize the harm, but hard to pin the blame. Laurie Garrett attended the World Economic Forum as a journalist and wrote a private email to a few close friends, only to see that email end up on a widely-read weblog.

This essay tells the story of that inevitable accident: an "accident" in that it needn't have happened, but "inevitable" in that there's no principled way to prevent similar misunderstandings from recurring, again and again …


Before You Log-On: Incorporating The Free Web In Your Legal Research Strategy, Lauren M. Collins Jul 2008

Before You Log-On: Incorporating The Free Web In Your Legal Research Strategy, Lauren M. Collins

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

In 2006, the American Bar Association (ABA) published its Legal Technology Survey Report, which included a volume on Online Research. In the report, attorneys responded that 91% are conducting at least some of their research online. Though 39% report that they start their research using a fee-based service like Westlaw or Lexis, the report shows that even those who start their research with a fee-based resource eventually get it right-87% of attorneys report using some free online resources at some point over the course of a research project.


Tales, Techs And Territories: Private International Law, Globalization, And The Legal Construction Of Borderlessness On The Internet, Andrea Slane Jul 2008

Tales, Techs And Territories: Private International Law, Globalization, And The Legal Construction Of Borderlessness On The Internet, Andrea Slane

Law and Contemporary Problems

The Internet has often been described as "borderless," owing to the technical features of Internet communications that make content accessible to anyone with a network connection, regardless of his or her location. This borderlessness has been widely thought both to confound legal regimes relying on territoriality and to fundamentally create a crisis for jurisdictional determination of both public- and private-law matters. Here, Slane dissects the images of globalization at work in conflicts cases involving harms caused by postings on the Internet and demonstrates how these images work to produce a coherence for the field of conflicts as well as the …


Ceo Postings: Leveraging The Internet’S Communications Potential While Managing The Message To Maintain Corporate Governance Interests In Information Security, Reputation And Compliance, Margo E. K. Reder May 2008

Ceo Postings: Leveraging The Internet’S Communications Potential While Managing The Message To Maintain Corporate Governance Interests In Information Security, Reputation And Compliance, Margo E. K. Reder

Margo E. K. Reder

CEO POSTINGS –

LEVERAGING THE INTERNET’S COMMUNICATIONS POTENTIAL WHILE MANAGING THE MESSAGE TO MAINTAIN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE INTERESTS IN INFORMATION SECURITY, REPUTATION AND COMPLIANCE

By Margo E. K. Reder

For approximately eight years, Whole Foods Market, Inc. [Whole Foods] CEO John Mackey posted messages to Yahoo! Financial’s online message board for Whole Foods. Rather than using his real name, Mr. Mackey like many posters to chat rooms, created an online alter ego and posted his comments under a pseudonym. As “Rahodeb” Mr. Mackey promoted his Whole Foods chain, boasted about personal stock gains in Whole Foods stock, company plans and performance …


Confronting The Limits Of The First Amendment: A Proactive Approach For Media Defendants Facing Liability Abroad, Michelle A. Wyant May 2008

Confronting The Limits Of The First Amendment: A Proactive Approach For Media Defendants Facing Liability Abroad, Michelle A. Wyant

San Diego International Law Journal

This Article confronts the limits this issue imposes on the First Amendment in four parts. Part I described the potential for conflicting defamation laws and forum shopping to undermine the American media's speech protections in the context of the Internet and global publications and outlines the Article's overall method of analysis. Part II first orients these conflicting defamation laws with respect to their development from the common law. It then frames them in terms of the underlying structural and policy differences that have produced their substantive divergence. This frame provides the analytical perspective through which this Article examines the varying …


Cyber Embargo: Countering The Internet Jihad, Gregory S. Mcneal Apr 2008

Cyber Embargo: Countering The Internet Jihad, Gregory S. Mcneal

Greg McNeal

Terrorists are engaged in an online jihad, characterized by the use of the internet to fundraise, distribute messages and directives, recruit and proselytize. It is impossible to shut down the entire presence of terrorists on the internet; however, this article details a proposal which can have a marked impact on the presence of terrorists on the internet. Using existing statutes, it is possible to regionalize terrorist websites, limiting them to an extremely small number of countries from which they may receive internet services. Once the terrorist message is limited to a particular region, a modification of current laws can allow …


Using Open Access To Increase Personal Internet Presence, James M. Donovan Apr 2008

Using Open Access To Increase Personal Internet Presence, James M. Donovan

Institutional Repository Supporting Materials

Discusses ways to raise internet profile by taking advantage of open access scholarship opportunities


Last-Mile Dilemma: How Network Neutrality Legislation Could Create Barriers To Innovation, Nicholas R. Brown Apr 2008

Last-Mile Dilemma: How Network Neutrality Legislation Could Create Barriers To Innovation, Nicholas R. Brown

Nicholas R Brown

This paper takes a look at the various concepts of Network Neutrality and their affects on the end user. And then investigates proposed policy solutions and how that policy may hinder future Internet innovation.


Omniveillance, Privacy In Public, And The Right To Your Digital Identity: A Tort For Recording And Disseminating An Individual’S Image Over The Internet, Josh Blackman Mar 2008

Omniveillance, Privacy In Public, And The Right To Your Digital Identity: A Tort For Recording And Disseminating An Individual’S Image Over The Internet, Josh Blackman

Josh Blackman

Internet giant Google recently began photographing American streets with a new technology they entitled Google Street View. These high-resolution cameras capture people, both outside, and inside of their homes, engaged in private matters. Although the present iteration of this technology only displays previously recorded images, current privacy laws do not prevent Google, or other technology companies, or wealthy individuals, from implementing a system that broadcasts live video feeds of street corner throughout America. Such pervasive human monitoring is the essence of the phenomenon this Article has termed omniveillance. This threat is all the more realistic in light of projected trends …


Chilling Effects: The Communications Decency Act And The Online Marketplace Of Ideas, Anthony M. Ciolli Mar 2008

Chilling Effects: The Communications Decency Act And The Online Marketplace Of Ideas, Anthony M. Ciolli

Anthony M Ciolli

The popularization of the Internet has ensured that, for the first time in human history, speech is in a position where it can become truly free. In 1996 Congress, hoping to preserve and promote a vibrant and competitive free marketplace of ideas on the Internet, passed Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a controversial statute that grants the owners of private online forums and other Internet intermediaries unprecedented immunity from liability for defamation and related torts committed by third party users. Since then, a fierce debate has raged over how to strike the proper balance between the seemingly competing …


The Strange Case Of Josh Wolf: What It Tells Us About Privilege Law, Anthony L. Fargo Feb 2008

The Strange Case Of Josh Wolf: What It Tells Us About Privilege Law, Anthony L. Fargo

Anthony L Fargo

The case of Josh Wolf, a blogger jailed for nearly six months for failing to comply with a subpoena, highlights several problems with the law of journalist's privilege. In particular, the Wolf case demonstrates the problems of defining who is a journalist and reconciling the law among different federal circuits and between federal and state courts. A proposed federal shield law may solve some, but not all, of these problems.


What Google Knows: Privacy And Internet Search Engines, Omer Tene Feb 2008

What Google Knows: Privacy And Internet Search Engines, Omer Tene

Omer Tene

Search engines are the dominant actors on the Internet today and Google is undoubtedly, the undisputed king of search, evoking ambivalent feelings. It is adored for its ingenuity, simple, modest-looking interface, and superb services offered at no (evident) cost. Yet increasingly, it is feared by privacy advocates who view it as a private sector "big brother," posing what one commentator dubbed “the most difficult privacy problem in all of human history.” Google is an informational gatekeeper, harboring previously unimaginable riches of personal data. Billions of search queries stream across Google servers each month, the aggregate thoughtstream of humankind online. Google …


Royalty Rate-Setting For Webcasters: A Royal(Ty) Mess, Amy Duvall Jan 2008

Royalty Rate-Setting For Webcasters: A Royal(Ty) Mess, Amy Duvall

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

The Internet is a haven for free expression. Not only are content-based restrictions disfavored, but "[the internet] provides relatively unlimited, low-cost capacity for communication of all kinds." Almost half of all Americans have listened to music online, whether rebroadcasts of terrestrial radio or to find niche music that terrestrial radio simply does not play, and 13 percent tune in regularly. Webcasters provide a unique outlet for new artists; however, if royalty rates are set too high for all but the largest webcasters to stay in business, the variety of music available will be severely restricted. Musical diversity stimulates the generation …


Can We Dicker Online Or Is Traditional Contract Formation Really Dying - Rethinking Traditional Contract Formation For The World Wide Web, Tatiana Melnik Jan 2008

Can We Dicker Online Or Is Traditional Contract Formation Really Dying - Rethinking Traditional Contract Formation For The World Wide Web, Tatiana Melnik

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

When most people imagine the process of contract formation, they picture two people sitting down and negotiating, arguing about particular contract provisions and particular contract terminology, and maybe even involving attorneys to draft an "official" version of the contract. Regardless of the specific details people imagine, traditional contract formation generally involves some form of negotiation between two parties where they choose one set of terms over another. In modern society, however, such negotiation happens very rarely. People enter into many contracts on a daily basis, for example, when they purchase goods or services online. Online purchases are governed by computers, …


E-Contract Doctrine 2.0: Standard Form Contracting In The Age Of Online User Participation , Shmuel I. Becher, Tal Z. Zarsky Jan 2008

E-Contract Doctrine 2.0: Standard Form Contracting In The Age Of Online User Participation , Shmuel I. Becher, Tal Z. Zarsky

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

The growing popularity of e-commerce transactions revives the perennial question of consumer contract law: should non-salient provisions of consumer standard form contracts be enforced? With the focus presently on an ex-ante analysis, scholars debate whether consumers can and should read standardized terms at the time of contracting. In today's information age, such a focus might be misguided. The online realm furnishes various tools, so-called "Web 2.0" applications, which encourage the flow of information from experienced to prospective consumers. This Article, therefore, reframes the analysis of online consumer contracts while taking into account this new flow of information. In doing so, …


When Mobile Phones Are Rfid-Equipped - Finding E.U.-U.S. Solutions To Protect Consumer Privacy And Facilitate Mobile Commerce, Nancy J. King Jan 2008

When Mobile Phones Are Rfid-Equipped - Finding E.U.-U.S. Solutions To Protect Consumer Privacy And Facilitate Mobile Commerce, Nancy J. King

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

New mobile phones have been designed to include delivery of mobile advertising and other useful location-based services, but have they also been designed to protect consumers' privacy? One of the key enabling technologies for these new types of phones and new mobile services is Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), a wireless communication technology that enables the unique identification of tagged objects. In the case of RFID-enabled mobile phones, the personal nature of the devices makes it very likely that, by locating a phone, businesses will also be able to locate its owner. Consumers are currently testing new RFID-enabled phones around the …


A New Frontier Or Merely A New Medium - An Analysis Of The Ethics Of Blawgs, Justin Krypel Jan 2008

A New Frontier Or Merely A New Medium - An Analysis Of The Ethics Of Blawgs, Justin Krypel

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

The purpose of this Note is to investigate those rules of ethics which interact with attorney blogs, placing a special emphasis on advertising rules. The central finding is that, under the Supreme Court's current First Amendment jurisprudence, attorney blogs (or, more cleverly, "blawgs") are not subject to regulation by the ethics codes of the ABA or the various state bars. Furthermore, if the Supreme Court were to, for some reason, construe blawgs as falling outside of First Amendment protection, evidence suggests that regulating this new medium would be neither desirable nor effective. Part II outlines the historical framework which underlies …


A Digital Cry For Help: Internet Radio’S Struggle To Survive A Second Royalty Rate Determination Under The Willing Buyer/Willing Seller Standard, Brian Flavin Jan 2008

A Digital Cry For Help: Internet Radio’S Struggle To Survive A Second Royalty Rate Determination Under The Willing Buyer/Willing Seller Standard, Brian Flavin

Saint Louis University Public Law Review

No abstract provided.


Fifteen Minutes Of Infamy: Privileged Reporting And The Problem Of Perpetual Reputational Harm, Richard J. Peltz-Steele Jan 2008

Fifteen Minutes Of Infamy: Privileged Reporting And The Problem Of Perpetual Reputational Harm, Richard J. Peltz-Steele

Faculty Publications

This Article provides an overview of the labyrinth of media tort defenses, specifically the four privileges – fair comment, fair report, neutral reportage, and wire service – that come into play when the media republish defamatory content about criminal suspects and defendants without specific intent to injure. The Article then discusses these privileges in light of a hypothetical case involving a highly publicized crime and an indicted suspect, against whom charges are later dropped, but who suffers perpetual reputational harm from the out-of-context republication online of news related to his indictment. The Article demonstrates how the four privileges would operate …


Kuwait University, Civil Law And The Internet: Genesis Of A Dedicated Civil Law-Teaching Website (Being A Unesco Cited Project), Mashael Alhajeri Jan 2008

Kuwait University, Civil Law And The Internet: Genesis Of A Dedicated Civil Law-Teaching Website (Being A Unesco Cited Project), Mashael Alhajeri

Mashael Alhajeri

No abstract provided.


Preserving Competition In Multi-Sided Innovative Markets: How Do You Solve A Problem Like Google?, Kristine Laudadio Devine Jan 2008

Preserving Competition In Multi-Sided Innovative Markets: How Do You Solve A Problem Like Google?, Kristine Laudadio Devine

Kristine L Devine

The unique characteristics of the search advertising industry encourage the development of anticompetitive monopoly power, facilitating the rise and dominance of companies like Google. First, the search advertising industry is subject to multi-sided network effects that create a positive feedback loop. An increase in the number of customers on one side of the market attracts increased numbers of customers on the other side, enabling dominant firms to entrench their market power. Second and relatedly, the search advertising industry operates in an innovative market where firms compete not to outdo competitors on price but rather to displace one another’s products entirely. …


Myspace Is Also Their Space: Ideas For Keeping Children Safe From Sexual Predators On Social Networking Sites, Susan H. Duncan Jan 2008

Myspace Is Also Their Space: Ideas For Keeping Children Safe From Sexual Predators On Social Networking Sites, Susan H. Duncan

Susan Duncan

A growing number of disturbing incidents involving minors as victims of sexual solicitation, assault and even murder have been traced to a fairly new type of Internet communication, social networking sites. These sites, hugely popular with teens, provide unique and largely independent and unsupervised channels of self expression and socialization for children. Yet the sites also present real dangers to today’s youth, the most serious being child victimization by sexual predators. To understand the magnitude of the issue this Article begins by defining what social networks are, explaining how they work and tracing their ever increasing popularity. Millions of users …


The Disruption Of Marital Eharmony: Distinguishing Mail-Order Brides From Online Dating In Evaluating "Good Faith Marriage", Brandon N. Robinson Jan 2008

The Disruption Of Marital Eharmony: Distinguishing Mail-Order Brides From Online Dating In Evaluating "Good Faith Marriage", Brandon N. Robinson

Brandon N. Robinson

ABSTRACT In today’s society, more and more people are turning to the information superhighway to find love. No longer confined to the girl or boy “next door,” many of today’s single men and women can connect with potential soul mates across the globe with the simple click of a button, symbolizing yet another consequence of a world community that is quickly becoming smaller and more interconnected. Once an international “match” has been made, the U.S. citizen can begin the complicated process of bringing his newfound loved one to the States. The IMO industry has a much more sinister underbelly, however, …


Asking For It: A Grokster-Based Approach To Internet Sites That Distribute Offensive Content, Zac Locke Jan 2008

Asking For It: A Grokster-Based Approach To Internet Sites That Distribute Offensive Content, Zac Locke

Zac Locke

Anyone connected to the Internet can post their words, images and any other expression to millions of sites online. However, these sites are also available to tortfeasors and criminals such as defamers, sexual predators, and child pornographers. These individuals rely on interactive computer services (“ICSs”), such as Internet service providers, search engines, social networking sites, video sharing sites, and chat rooms, to disseminate their illegal and offensive messages. The fact that torts and crimes such as defamation, predation and child pornography happen in cyberspace instead of on a street corner does not shield speakers from liability for their actions. However, …


Federal Search Commission? Access, Fairness, And Accountability In The Law Of Search, Oren Bracha, Frank Pasquale Jan 2008

Federal Search Commission? Access, Fairness, And Accountability In The Law Of Search, Oren Bracha, Frank Pasquale

Faculty Scholarship

Should search engines be subject to the types of regulation now applied to personal data collectors, cable networks, or phone books? In this article, we make the case for some regulation of the ability of search engines to manipulate and structure their results. We demonstrate that the First Amendment, properly understood, does not prohibit such regulation. Nor will such interventions inevitably lead to the disclosure of important trade secrets.

After setting forth normative foundations for evaluating search engine manipulation, we explain how neither market discipline nor technological advance is likely to stop it. Though savvy users and personalized search may …