Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 21 of 21

Full-Text Articles in Law

Why America Still Needs Affirmative Action, Jonathan K. Stubbs Oct 2008

Why America Still Needs Affirmative Action, Jonathan K. Stubbs

Law Faculty Publications

Affirmative action has gotten a bad rap.Many people think of affirmative action as race-based policies that favor unqualified persons because of the color of their skin. Resentments and misunderstandings flow from such perceptions in part because race remains America’s most inflammatory unfinished business.

To ignite a spirited, thoughtful discussion as well as practical action regarding affirmative action, this article briefly discusses what constitutes affirmative action; evaluates why affirmative action programs that consider race, gender, and class remain necessary; and offers some thoughts regarding when affirmative action should end.


Cracking The Egg: Which Came First—Stigma Or Affirmative Action?, Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Emily Houh, Mary Campbell Oct 2008

Cracking The Egg: Which Came First—Stigma Or Affirmative Action?, Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Emily Houh, Mary Campbell

Faculty Scholarship

This Article examines the strength of arguments concerning the causal connection between racial stigma and affirmative action. In so doing, this article reports and analyzes the results of a survey on internal stigma (feelings of dependency, inadequacy, or guilt) and external stigma (the burden of others' resentment or doubt about one's qualifications) for the Class of 2009 at seven public law schools, four of which employed race-based affirmative action policies when the Class of 2009 was admitted and three of which did not use such policies at that time. Specifically, this Article examines and presents survey findings of 1) minimal, …


Fairness And The Distribution Of Primary Goods, Nathan W. Dean Sep 2008

Fairness And The Distribution Of Primary Goods, Nathan W. Dean

Nathan W. Dean

I consider whether any one of the schemes of distributive justice envisioned by John Rawls, Robert Nozick, or G.A. Cohen is truly fair. By means of a close and critical reading of their work on distributive justice, I conclude that their schemes of distributive justice in some instances fail to correct for elements of unfairness and at other times introduce unfairness in the furtherance of other largely unacknowledged ends. More specifically, I (1) describe the ways in which Rawls, Nozick, and Cohen fail to show us what a fair scheme of distributive justice would look like, (2) sketch what I …


Are Blue And Pink The New Brown - The Permissibility Of Sex-Segregated Education As Affirmative Action, Dawinder S. Sidhu Jul 2008

Are Blue And Pink The New Brown - The Permissibility Of Sex-Segregated Education As Affirmative Action, Dawinder S. Sidhu

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


The Uncertain Future Of School Desegregation And The Importance Of Goodwill, Good Sense, And A Misguided Decision, Derek W. Black Jul 2008

The Uncertain Future Of School Desegregation And The Importance Of Goodwill, Good Sense, And A Misguided Decision, Derek W. Black

Faculty Publications

The article was part of a symposium on the jurisprudence of Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. First, the article analyzed whether the Court’s decision in Parents Involved v. Seattle Schools was consistent with Justice O’Connor’s majority opinion in Grutter v. Bollinger. The article concludes that Parents Involved narrowly construed the holding in Grutter and limited its effect. Second, the article assessed the practical import of the decision in Parents Involved. It found that the opinion made voluntary desegregation more difficult than it otherwise would be and, thus, would discourage many school districts from taking progressive action. Unfortunately, the article …


Judicial Decision-Making, Social Science Evidence, And Equal Educational Opportunity: Uneasy Relations And Uncertain Futures, Michael Heise Jul 2008

Judicial Decision-Making, Social Science Evidence, And Equal Educational Opportunity: Uneasy Relations And Uncertain Futures, Michael Heise

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Lawrence Summers At The Nber Conference: The Real Deal, Taunya Lovell Banks Jun 2008

Lawrence Summers At The Nber Conference: The Real Deal, Taunya Lovell Banks

Taunya Lovell Banks

This mini commentary is written in response to a public speech made by Lawrence Summers, then President of Harvard University in 2005 in which he asserted that the under-representation of women in science and engineering may be due in part to biological differences in abilities between women and men. This commentary argues that Summers' remarks constitute a brief against affirmative action for women stated so broadly that it easily encompasses objections to affirmative action for blacks and other non-white Americans. It concludes that our inability or unwillingness to make connections between gender bias and racial privilege helps to maintain a …


Contested Terrains Of Compensation: Equality, Affirmative Action And Diversity In The United States, Taunya L. Banks Jun 2008

Contested Terrains Of Compensation: Equality, Affirmative Action And Diversity In The United States, Taunya L. Banks

Taunya Lovell Banks

No abstract provided.


Contested Terrains Of Compensation: Equality, Affirmative Action And Diversity In The United States, Taunya L. Banks Jun 2008

Contested Terrains Of Compensation: Equality, Affirmative Action And Diversity In The United States, Taunya L. Banks

Taunya Lovell Banks

No abstract provided.


Subordination And The Fortuity Of Our Circumstances, Sergio J. Campos May 2008

Subordination And The Fortuity Of Our Circumstances, Sergio J. Campos

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The antisubordination principle exists at the margins of equality law. This Article seeks to revive the antisubordination principle by taking a fresh look at its structure and underlying justification. First, the Article provides an account of the harm of subordination that focuses on one's position in society, rejecting the focus on groups popular in the existing antisubordination literature. Second, it argues for a theory of state obligation that goes beyond both the existing state action doctrine of the Equal Protection Clause and the failure to protect doctrine associated with Charles Black. The Article argues instead that the antisubordination principle mandates …


"The People" And "The People": Disaggregating Citizen Lawmaking From Popular Constitutionalism, Raphael Rajendra Mar 2008

"The People" And "The People": Disaggregating Citizen Lawmaking From Popular Constitutionalism, Raphael Rajendra

Raphael Rajendra

In this essay, I argue that popular constitutionalism can be understood – and the borders it shares with the wider corpus of studies on constitutional change can be demarcated – by thinking of constitutions that either "live among people" or are "entombed in glass cases." This analysis distinguishes between popular constitutionalism and a ballot initiative-oriented notion of constitutional change that I call "initiative constitutionalism." Popular constitutionalism and initiative constitutionalism advance substantially different models for tempering democracy and other fundamental values. To conflate these models – and to call the MCRI a product of popular constitutionalism when it is not – …


Cracking The Egg: Which Came First -- Stigma Or Affirmative Action?, Emily Houh, Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Mary Campbell Jan 2008

Cracking The Egg: Which Came First -- Stigma Or Affirmative Action?, Emily Houh, Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Mary Campbell

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

This Article examines the strength of arguments concerning the causal connection between racial stigma and affirmative action. In so doing, this Article reports and analyzes the results of a survey on internal stigma (feelings of dependency, inadequacy, or guilt) and external stigma (the burden of others' resentment or doubt about one's qualifications) for the Class of 2009 at seven public law schools, four of which employed race-based policies when the Class of 2009 was admitted and three of which did not use such policies at that time. Specifically, this Article examines and presents survey findings of 1) minimal, if any, …


Affirmative Action & Negative Action: How Jian Li's Case Can Benefit Asian Americans, Adrian Liu Jan 2008

Affirmative Action & Negative Action: How Jian Li's Case Can Benefit Asian Americans, Adrian Liu

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

In October 2006, Asian American student Jian D filed a civil rights complaint against Princeton University claiming that Princeton's affirmative action policies were discriminatory. Li argues that affirmative action gives preferences to non-Asian minorities at the expense of Asian students. Li's case aligns the interests of Asian Americans with Whites who challenge affirmative action and suggests that such policies are inherently discriminatory because they exclude students based on race and sacrifice merit. This Article argues that Li's exclusion is not due to affirmative action but is likely due to "negative action," the unfavorable treatment of Asian Americans relative to Whites. …


From Proposition 209 To Proposal 2: Examining The Effects Of Anti-Affirmative Action Voter Initiatives, Michigan Journal Of Race & Law Jan 2008

From Proposition 209 To Proposal 2: Examining The Effects Of Anti-Affirmative Action Voter Initiatives, Michigan Journal Of Race & Law

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

Transcript of the symposium held at the University of Michigan Law School on Saturday, February 9, 2008 in Hutchins Hall Room 100


Are Law Schools Racist? - Part Ii (Symposium: Deconstructing Race: When Reasonable Minds Differ), Dan Subotnik Jan 2008

Are Law Schools Racist? - Part Ii (Symposium: Deconstructing Race: When Reasonable Minds Differ), Dan Subotnik

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Judicial Decision-Making, Social Science Evidence, And Equal Educational Opportunity: Uneasy Relations And Uncertain Futures, Michael Heise Jan 2008

Judicial Decision-Making, Social Science Evidence, And Equal Educational Opportunity: Uneasy Relations And Uncertain Futures, Michael Heise

Seattle University Law Review

The full extent of what the Court decided in Grutter and Parents Involved remains in some dispute. What is far more certain is that both cases continue to stir deeply held passions that help frame public and legal debates about the Court and its role in affirmative action and school desegregation disputes. Amid these increasingly raucous debates, this Article expressly side steps the many questions (and controversies) about what the Court decided in those cases and seeks to escape from the frequently politically charged and volatile context of governmental uses of race. This Article instead focuses on how the Court …


Plessy's Ghost: Grutter, Seattle And The Quiet Reversal Of Brown, D. Marvin Jones Jan 2008

Plessy's Ghost: Grutter, Seattle And The Quiet Reversal Of Brown, D. Marvin Jones

Articles

No abstract provided.


Demise Of The Talented Tenth: Affirmative Action And The Increasing Underrepresentation Of Ascendant Blacks At Selective Educational Institutions, Kevin D. Brown, Jeannine Bell Jan 2008

Demise Of The Talented Tenth: Affirmative Action And The Increasing Underrepresentation Of Ascendant Blacks At Selective Educational Institutions, Kevin D. Brown, Jeannine Bell

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Over the past 30 years America has experienced both a substantial increase in the percentage of blacks multiracial blacks and an unprecedented influx of voluntary immigration of blacks primarily from Africa and the Caribbean. The percentage of foreign-born black immigrants reached 8% of the black population in 2005, and no doubt is higher today. There is evidence that suggests not only that multiracial blacks and foreign-born black immigrants and their sons and daughters constitute a disproportionate percentage of black students in selective higher education programs, but their percentages are larger than most people realize. This article addresses the resulting change …


Symposium: Race Across Boundaries: Introduction, Kevin D. Brown Jan 2008

Symposium: Race Across Boundaries: Introduction, Kevin D. Brown

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Don't Count Them Out Just Yet: Toward The Plausible Use Of Race-Preference Student Assignment Plans, Leslie Yalof Garfield Jan 2008

Don't Count Them Out Just Yet: Toward The Plausible Use Of Race-Preference Student Assignment Plans, Leslie Yalof Garfield

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the Supreme Court's recent decision in Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 11 could serve to broaden the permissible use of race beyond the boundaries presently permitted by the Court. In this highly fractionalized decision, five justices ultimately agreed that the race-based student assignment plans before their review could not withstand judicial scrutiny. One of these justices, Justice Kennedy, agreed with the plurality's conclusion, but rejected the plurality's assessment that it is never permissible to use race-preference student assignment plans absent evidence of de jure segregation. His concurrence, when read together with …


Stifling The Potential Of Grutter V. Bollinger: Parents Involved In Community Schools V. Seattle School District No. 1, Michelle Adams Jan 2008

Stifling The Potential Of Grutter V. Bollinger: Parents Involved In Community Schools V. Seattle School District No. 1, Michelle Adams

Articles

No abstract provided.