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2007

Jurisdiction

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Articles 1 - 30 of 77

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Dissolution Of The Matrimonial Property Regime And The Succession Rights Of The Surviving Spouse, Maria Álvarez Torné Dec 2007

The Dissolution Of The Matrimonial Property Regime And The Succession Rights Of The Surviving Spouse, Maria Álvarez Torné

Cornell Law Faculty Working Papers

These pages are addressed to examining the problems arising from the regulation of the dissolution of the matrimonial property regime on the death of one of the spouses in relation to the determination of the succession rights of the surviving spouse in Private International Law (from now on, PIL). I will specifically try to analyse the conciliation difficulties between what is stipulated in each relevant field after the death of one of the spouses. The surviving spouse’s situation often depends on the simultaneous effect of the matrimonial property regime and also of Succession Law. In fact, this study deals with …


The Admiralty Jurisdiction Of Torts And Crimes And The Failed Search For Its Purposes, Graydon S. Staring Oct 2007

The Admiralty Jurisdiction Of Torts And Crimes And The Failed Search For Its Purposes, Graydon S. Staring

Graydon S. Staring

This article views the jurisdiction, or power, of the Admiral in its historic setting as that of a governor, a ruler, of the offshore waters claimed by the kings. He had military, legislative (regulatory), police and judicial powers, the recognition of which became customary for maritime nations. The judicial jurisdiction comprised the legal questions that arose from his other functions. Like the rest of his powers, it was territorial rather than defined by other subject matter. This was the situation when the Constitution was adopted, when admiralty in its broadest form known to us was found in the colonies and …


The Minimal Role Of Federalism And State Law In Arbitration, Edward Brunet Oct 2007

The Minimal Role Of Federalism And State Law In Arbitration, Edward Brunet

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


From Federalism To Intersystemic Governance: The Changing Nature Of Modern Jurisdiction, Robert B. Ahdieh Oct 2007

From Federalism To Intersystemic Governance: The Changing Nature Of Modern Jurisdiction, Robert B. Ahdieh

Faculty Scholarship

At heart, this introductory essay aspires to encourage scholars who write in widely divergent areas, yet share a focus on the changing nature of jurisdiction, to engage one another more closely. From Jackson's study of "convergence, resistance, and engagement" among courts, Kingsbury's study of "global administrative law," and Bermann's analysis of "transatlantic regulatory cooperation," to Resnik's evaluation of "trans-local networks," Weiser's account of "cooperative federalism" in telecommunications law, and Thompson's concept of "collaborative corporate governance," a related set of questions is ultimately at stake: How ought we understand the reach of any given decision-maker's jurisdiction? What are the implications of …


From Incitement To Indictment? Prosecuting Iran's President For Advocating Israel's Destruction And Piecing Together Incitement Law's Emerging Analytical Framework, Gregory S. Gordon Sep 2007

From Incitement To Indictment? Prosecuting Iran's President For Advocating Israel's Destruction And Piecing Together Incitement Law's Emerging Analytical Framework, Gregory S. Gordon

Gregory S. Gordon

On October 25, 2005, at an anti-Zionism conference in Tehran, Iran's President, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, called for Israel to "be wiped off the face of the map" -- the first in a series of incendiary speeches arguably advocating liquidation of the Jewish state. Certain commentators argue that these speeches constitute direct and public incitement to commit genocide. This Article analyzes these arguments by examining the nature and scope of recent groundbreaking developments in incitement law arising from the Rwandan genocide prosecutions. For the first time in the legal literature, the Article pieces together an analytical framework based on principles derived from …


On Mutual Mistakes, Daniel Cohen Sep 2007

On Mutual Mistakes, Daniel Cohen

Daniel Cohen

Herein we reconsider what has for over a century been a judicial inconsistency inspiring mostly dismissive scorn. We find a classical disparity in judicial reasoning to have a surprising hidden profundity and we identify it as a sincere though unintentional attempt of erstwhile courts to perform what would today be seem as an admirable effort of social policy making. We shall examine a curious pair of seemingly inconsistent rulings from a century ago and conclude that they are actually consistent with the principles of Law and Economics as understood today, although they were at that time uncomfortably incongruous. The only …


Rubin V. The Islamic Republic Of Iran - A Struggle For Control Of Persian Antiquities In America, James A. Wawrzyniak Sep 2007

Rubin V. The Islamic Republic Of Iran - A Struggle For Control Of Persian Antiquities In America, James A. Wawrzyniak

James A Wawrzyniak Jr

This paper analyzes the multi-jurisdictional attachment and execution proceedings taking place sub nomine Rubin v. The Islamic Republic of Iran. The Rubin litigation raises novel issues in the areas of art law and foreign relations. The first section of the paper evaluates whether third parties have standing to raise a sovereign state’s immunity under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (“FSIA”). The second delves into the particulars of the commercial use exception to the FSIA. The final section considers various provisions of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act of 2001, a new law with little judicial gloss. These three main issues are …


The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act: Using A "Shield" Statute As A "Sword" For Obtaining Federal Jurisdiction In Art And Antiquities Cases, Lauren F. Redman Sep 2007

The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act: Using A "Shield" Statute As A "Sword" For Obtaining Federal Jurisdiction In Art And Antiquities Cases, Lauren F. Redman

Lauren F Redman

This paper examines the emergence of art and antiquities restitution cases being brought in U.S. federal courts under the FSIA. The purpose of the paper is twofold. First, it aims to serve as a compendium of the major art and antiquities restitution cases brought under the FSIA up to this point. In addition, it examines several questions concerning the appropriateness of the FSIA being used in the way it has been in the context of the art cases. Have the jurisdiction granting provisions springing from the exceptions to the FSIA eclipsed the primary purpose of foreign sovereign immunity, which is …


Burdens Of Jurisdictional Proof, Lonny Hoffman Sep 2007

Burdens Of Jurisdictional Proof, Lonny Hoffman

Lonny Hoffman

Having passed the most significant legislative reform of complex litigation in American history, advocates of the Class Action Fairness Act have now set their sights on more technical battles of statutory interpretation and application. Their ambitions span a broad range: from trying to stretch the boundaries of CAFA’s reach, in the first instance, to divining new principles in the conflict of laws which bear, ultimately, on the propriety of class certification. One of the most important questions with which courts are wrestling with regard to the Class Action Fairness Act concerns the burden of jurisdictional proof. In the broadest sense, …


Originalism And The Problem Of Fundament Fairness, R. George Wright Sep 2007

Originalism And The Problem Of Fundament Fairness, R. George Wright

R. George Wright Professor

Originalism is perhaps the most prominent theory of how to interpret the Constitution. Originalism, however, rests upon a process of constitutional drafting and ratification that systematically excluded important demographic groups. Originalism thus rests on a fundamental injustice. Crucially, this fundamental injustice is not confined to the past once the various excluded groups gain the franchise. Originalist theories remain crucially tainted and skewed, particularly with respect to constitutional questions on which originally excluded groups had interests diverging from those of non-excluded groups. The continuing effects of the fundamental unfairness of the constitutional drafting and ratifying process are explored through considering the …


Rejecting The Touchstone: Complete Preemption And Congressional Intent After Beneficial National Bank V. Anderson, Margaret C. Tarkington Sep 2007

Rejecting The Touchstone: Complete Preemption And Congressional Intent After Beneficial National Bank V. Anderson, Margaret C. Tarkington

Margaret C Tarkington

The paper examines the doctrine of complete preemption—a jurisdictional doctrine that allows for removal based on a federal preemption defense contrary to the well-pleaded complaint rule. The doctrine was expanded by the Supreme Court in 2003 in Beneficial National Bank v. Anderson. This paper explores efficiency, separation of powers, and federalism problems created by Anderson, both generally and in the context of a specific statutory scheme—the Carmack Amendment. The paper then offers a new framework, relying on congressional intent to create federal removal jurisdiction, for determining when complete preemption should apply.


The Domestic Legal Status Of Customary International Law In Comparative Perspective, David M. Ginn Sep 2007

The Domestic Legal Status Of Customary International Law In Comparative Perspective, David M. Ginn

David M Ginn

This essay considers the contested domestic legal status of customary international law. Two distinct positions have emerged in the debates about customary international law. The first position maintains that customary international law operates as a type of federal common law that is automatically incorporated into U.S. law and should be applied by courts in any appropriate case. The second position holds that only the political branches may incorporate customary international law into U.S. law, and that courts may only apply customary international law if a federal statute authorizes them to do so.

Drawing from the federal courts' experience with admiralty …


Infringement & The International Reach Of U.S. Patent Law, Moin A. Yahya, Cameron Hutchison Aug 2007

Infringement & The International Reach Of U.S. Patent Law, Moin A. Yahya, Cameron Hutchison

Moin A Yahya

American Patent Law, through both judicial and legislative efforts, has evolved from a strict territorial based set of laws asserting jurisdiction only over those infringements taking place on American soil to a more expansive set of rules asserting jurisdiction over any event that may harm patent holders in the United States regardless of where the infringement is taking place. This, we argue, is contrary to the original purpose of Patent Law and inconsistent with American obligations under the International Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPS). We argue for a return to territorial based rules of jurisdiction. Such a …


“Manifest” Destiny?: How Some Courts Have Fallaciously Come To Require A Greater Showing Of Congressional Intent For Jurisdictional Exhaustion Than They Require For Preemption, Colin Miller Aug 2007

“Manifest” Destiny?: How Some Courts Have Fallaciously Come To Require A Greater Showing Of Congressional Intent For Jurisdictional Exhaustion Than They Require For Preemption, Colin Miller

Colin Miller

Abstract for Colin Miller, “Manifest” Destiny?: How Some Courts Have Fallaciously Come To Require A Greater Showing Of Congressional Intent For Jurisdictional Exhaustion Than They Require For Preemption Congress engages in preemption when it enacts federal legislation that supersedes any existing state and local laws in a particular field and proscribes any future state and local regulation of that field. Because preemption repeals state and local legislative authority over traditional areas of state law, courts have understandably required that preemptive legislation evince “clear and manifest” Congressional intent to supersede state and local legislation. Conversely, when Congress includes a jurisdictional exhaustion …


L'Azione Revocatoria Internazionale Fra Giurisdizione E Legge Applicabile, Valerio Sangiovanni Aug 2007

L'Azione Revocatoria Internazionale Fra Giurisdizione E Legge Applicabile, Valerio Sangiovanni

Valerio Sangiovanni

No abstract provided.


Misguided Fairness? Regulating Arbitration By Statute: Empirical Evidence Of Declining Award Finality, Michael H. Leroy Aug 2007

Misguided Fairness? Regulating Arbitration By Statute: Empirical Evidence Of Declining Award Finality, Michael H. Leroy

Michael H LeRoy

The Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) created a national policy that promotes arbitration. Congress passed this law to end judicial hostility to arbitration. So far, no one has questioned this premise. My Article shows, however, that nineteenth century courts enforced arbitrator awards, even those that failed to conform to “technicalities and niceties.” Acting on the mistaken advice that judges excessively interfere with arbitration, Congress enacted a law that transfers oversight of arbitration from the judiciary to legislatures.

This change is affecting how court reviews arbitrator awards. I collected data in 426 federal and state court rulings in employment disputes from June …


International Organizations In Us Courts: Reconsidering The Anachronism Of Absolute Immunity, Steven B. Herz Aug 2007

International Organizations In Us Courts: Reconsidering The Anachronism Of Absolute Immunity, Steven B. Herz

Steven B. Herz

No abstract provided.


License To Sue?, Lorelei Ritchie De Larena Aug 2007

License To Sue?, Lorelei Ritchie De Larena

Lorelei Ritchie de Larena

Courts, commentators and practitioners have for too long viewed intellectual property law as a discrete discipline, without putting it into the proper theoretical context of general jurisprudence. Intellectual property law cannot and must not exist on its own, outside the normative framework of overlapping legal institutions. Even within the rubric of intellectual property, courts have overlooked the potential for cross-applying relevant doctrines between patent, copyright, and trademark law. Certainly, when intellectual property disputes touch on other disciplines, such as civil procedure, contract, or tort law, courts have tended to overlook their synergies, focusing instead on only one of several important …


Foreign Plaintiffs, Forum Non Conveniens, And Consistency, Andrew R. Klein Aug 2007

Foreign Plaintiffs, Forum Non Conveniens, And Consistency, Andrew R. Klein

Andrew R Klein

Few topics inspire more debate than globalization. Yet, despite controversy, a more integrated global economy seems inevitable. As former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan has stated, “arguing against globalization is like arguing against the laws of gravity.”

One consequence of globalization is an increased likelihood that a person will suffer harm caused by the conduct of an entity based outside her own country. This, in turn, can lead to a victim seeking compensation far from home. The trend is evident in the United States, where an increasing number of foreign plaintiffs are seeking relief based on events that took …


The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights At Sixty: Is It Still Right For The United States?, Tai-Heng Cheng Jul 2007

The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights At Sixty: Is It Still Right For The United States?, Tai-Heng Cheng

Tai-Heng Cheng

Many scholars and human rights advocates have hailed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a triumph for the human rights movement. The occasion of its sixtieth anniversary in 2008 provides pause to appraise if in fact it has been a success and whether it still is of any value to the United States. To conduct such an appraisal, this article reviewed the contemporaneous records of negotiations leading to the adoption of the Declaration by the UN General Assembly. It also reviewed the decisions of U.S. federal and state courts, the International Court of Justice, and Australian courts that have …


Jurisdictionality And Bowles V. Russell, Scott Dodson Jul 2007

Jurisdictionality And Bowles V. Russell, Scott Dodson

Scott Dodson

When is a limitation “jurisdictional,” and when is it not? Litigators encounter these questions all the time in statutory coverage issues, in time limitations, and in a host of other preconditions. They are critical, for jurisdictional limitations are not subject to waiver or equitable exceptions, may be raised at any time, and obligate courts to monitor and raise them sua sponte. In Bowles v. Russell, the Court held that the statutory time limitation for filing a notice of appeal is jurisdictional. This essay critiques Bowles, predicts some of the difficulties that it might cause, and offers a better approach.


The Lay-Up Warranty And Wilburn Boat: I.N.A. V. San Juan Excursions, Graydon S. Staring Jul 2007

The Lay-Up Warranty And Wilburn Boat: I.N.A. V. San Juan Excursions, Graydon S. Staring

Graydon S. Staring

This article is an exposition of the uselessness of factors of causation and increase of risk in cases of breach of the lay-up warranty and some reflections on the mischaracterization of federal maritime law as State law in looking for establishment or entrenchment under Wilburn Boat.


A Alteração Do Regimento Interno Do Supremo Tribunal Federal Para A Aplicação Da Repercussão Geral Da Questão Constitucional No Recurso Extraordinário, Nelson Rodrigues Netto Jun 2007

A Alteração Do Regimento Interno Do Supremo Tribunal Federal Para A Aplicação Da Repercussão Geral Da Questão Constitucional No Recurso Extraordinário, Nelson Rodrigues Netto

Nelson Rodrigues Netto

No abstract provided.


Standing To Sue In The Absence Of Prosecution: Can A Case Be Too Controversial For Case Or Controversy?, David T. Hardy Jun 2007

Standing To Sue In The Absence Of Prosecution: Can A Case Be Too Controversial For Case Or Controversy?, David T. Hardy

David T. Hardy

The Supreme Court has recognized that, except in highly unusual situations, a plaintiff has “harm in fact,” and thus standing to sue, if a criminal statute outlaws conduct in which he intends to engage and which is arguably within the protections of the Constitution. Three Circuits have, however, evolved contradictory strings of caselaw, in which certain challenges are assessed in accord with the Supreme Court’s teachings, while other, indistinguishable, challenges are subjected to much stricter standards, standards which are almost impossible to meet. The Circuits rarely attempt to reconcile the two sets of decisions, and when they do, the resolution …


Fundamental Reform In Public Safety Communications Policy, Jon M. Peha Jun 2007

Fundamental Reform In Public Safety Communications Policy, Jon M. Peha

Federal Communications Law Journal

Symposium: The Crisis in Public Safety Communications. Held at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, December 8, 2006.

The communications systems used by first responders in the U.S. are inadequate, primarily because of outdated and ineffective public policy. Fundamental reform is needed, and the upcoming digital TV transition provides an outstanding opportunity. This Article describes options available to policymakers, if they act soon.


Sending Out An S.O.S.: Public Safety Communications Interoperability As A Collective Action Problem, Jerry Brito Jun 2007

Sending Out An S.O.S.: Public Safety Communications Interoperability As A Collective Action Problem, Jerry Brito

Federal Communications Law Journal

Symposium: The Crisis in Public Safety Communications. Held at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, December 8, 2006.

Lack of public safety communications interoperability is the result of what economist Mancur Olson called a collective action problem. In this case, the collective action problem that first responders face is caused by the federal policy of allocating and assigning public safety spectrum in a way that segregates first responders to their own bands and ultimately Balkanizes their radio systems. This Article shows that market forces can be employed to solve collective action problems, and it surveys several successful commercial interoperable …


Solving The Interoperability Problem: Are We On The Same Channel? An Essay On The Problems And Prospects For Public Safety Radio, Gerald R. Faulhaber Jun 2007

Solving The Interoperability Problem: Are We On The Same Channel? An Essay On The Problems And Prospects For Public Safety Radio, Gerald R. Faulhaber

Federal Communications Law Journal

Symposium: The Crisis in Public Safety Communications. Held at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, December 8, 2006.

A number of disasters over the last two decades have demonstrated the dire consequences that occur when first responders are unable to communicate due to interoperability of their communications equipment. Each such disaster is followed by a strong reaction from the Federal government, promising immediate action, often with plans to deploy the latest technology. In fact, nothing has ever actually happened at the Federal level to solve first responders' interoperability problem. As I show using a case study from Delaware, states …


An Uninvited Guest: The Federal Death Penalty And The Massachusetts Prosecution Of Nurse Kristen Gilbert, John P. Cunningham May 2007

An Uninvited Guest: The Federal Death Penalty And The Massachusetts Prosecution Of Nurse Kristen Gilbert, John P. Cunningham

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Unitary Executive, Jurisdiction Stripping, And The Hamdan Opinions: A Textualist Response To Justice Scalia, Gary S. Lawson, Steven Calabresi May 2007

The Unitary Executive, Jurisdiction Stripping, And The Hamdan Opinions: A Textualist Response To Justice Scalia, Gary S. Lawson, Steven Calabresi

Faculty Scholarship

In Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, a five to three majority of the United States Supreme Court held unlawful the Bush Administration's use of military commissions to try alien combatant detainees held at the United States airbase in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The most basic issue in Hamdan was whether the Supreme Court had jurisdiction to hear the case. Justice Scalia's dissenting opinion argued that the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005 stripped the Supreme Court and all other courts of jurisdiction to hear habeas cases such as Hamdan's.

Hamdan argued in the Supreme Court that to read the Detainee Treatment Act to …


The Asylum Law Of The Particular Social Group, Matthew Paul Nickson Apr 2007

The Asylum Law Of The Particular Social Group, Matthew Paul Nickson

Matthew Paul Nickson

No abstract provided.