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Full-Text Articles in Law

Judging Genes: Implications Of The Second Generation Of Genetic Tests In The Courtroom, Diane E. Hoffmann, Karen H. Rothenberg Oct 2007

Judging Genes: Implications Of The Second Generation Of Genetic Tests In The Courtroom, Diane E. Hoffmann, Karen H. Rothenberg

Faculty Scholarship

The use of DNA tests for identification has revolutionized court proceedings in criminal and paternity cases. Now, requests by litigants to admit or compel a second generation of genetic tests – tests to confirm or predict genetic diseases and conditions – threaten to affect judicial decision-making in many more contexts. Unlike DNA tests for identification, these second generation tests may provide highly personal health and behavioral information about individuals and their relatives and will pose new challenges for trial court judges. This article reports on an original empirical study of how judges analyze these requests and uses the study results to inform ...


The Risky Business Of Lifestyle Genetic Testing: Protecting Against Harmful Disclosure Of Genetic Information, Gabrielle Z. Kohlmeier Sep 2007

The Risky Business Of Lifestyle Genetic Testing: Protecting Against Harmful Disclosure Of Genetic Information, Gabrielle Z. Kohlmeier

Gabrielle Z Kohlmeier

The technological and scientific advances of nutrigenetic testing imply that the future is here, but unfortunately the legal protections are not. Nutrigenetics—the newly developing science correlating diet and genotypes—promises an easier way to escape the consequences of unhealthy lifestyles. And a large contingent of Americans, including cost-conscious employers and health insurers, are seeking such high-tech solutions. Web-based nutrigenetic testing, purportedly offering custom-tailored plans without a trip to the doctor’s office, thus captures a wide audience. The enthusiasm for nutrigenetics may obfuscate the unusual problems surrounding protection of genetic information, particularly in a market context. Upon providing genetic ...


Judging Genes: Implications Of The Second Generation Of Genetic Tests Inthe Courtroom, Diane E. Hoffmann, Karen H. Rothenberg Jan 2007

Judging Genes: Implications Of The Second Generation Of Genetic Tests Inthe Courtroom, Diane E. Hoffmann, Karen H. Rothenberg

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Should Players Have To Pass To Play?: A Legal Analysis Of Implementing Genetic Testing In The National Basketball Association, Susan K. Menge Jan 2007

Should Players Have To Pass To Play?: A Legal Analysis Of Implementing Genetic Testing In The National Basketball Association, Susan K. Menge

Marquette Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


Technological Advancement And International Human Rights: Is Science Improving Human Life Or Perpetuating Human Rights Violations?, Christine A. Khalili-Borna Jan 2007

Technological Advancement And International Human Rights: Is Science Improving Human Life Or Perpetuating Human Rights Violations?, Christine A. Khalili-Borna

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Note assesses the practices of pre-implantation and prenatal genetic screening and sex-determination through an international human rights framework founded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Universal Declaration), the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW).


Please, Let's Bury The Junk: The Codis Loci And The Revelation Of Private Information, David H. Kaye Jan 2007

Please, Let's Bury The Junk: The Codis Loci And The Revelation Of Private Information, David H. Kaye

Journal Articles

This Northwestern University Law Review Colloquy paper describes the four possible ways in which genetic loci could possess predictive or diagnostic value with regard to diseases and explains why these mechanisms have not led, and probably cannot lead, to useful screening tests with the Convicted Offender DNA Index System (CODIS) profiles in national, state, and local databases. It then considers the phenotypes and familial relationships that the CODIS STRs can be used to identify. The profiles carry limited information about an individual's race and familial relationships, and the article places the resulting privacy issues in perspective. Finally, the paper ...