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2007

Administrative Law

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Articles 1 - 30 of 64

Full-Text Articles in Law

Mississippi River Stories: Lessons From A Century Of Floods And Hurricanes, Sandra Zellmer, Christine Klein Oct 2007

Mississippi River Stories: Lessons From A Century Of Floods And Hurricanes, Sandra Zellmer, Christine Klein

Sandi Zellmer

n the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the nation pondered how a relatively weak Category 3 storm could have destroyed an entire region. Few appreciated the extent to which a flawed federal water development policy transformed this apparently natural disaster into a “manmade” disaster; fewer still appreciated how the disaster was the predictable, and indeed predicted, sequel to almost a century of similar disasters. This article focuses upon three such stories: the Great Flood of 1927, the Midwest Flood of 1993, and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita of 2005. Taken together, the stories reveal important lessons, including the inadequacy of engineered flood …


Signing Statements And Statutory Interpretation In The Bush Administration, Neil Kinkopf Oct 2007

Signing Statements And Statutory Interpretation In The Bush Administration, Neil Kinkopf

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


A Philosophy Of Privitization: Rationing Health Care Through The Medicare Modernization Act Of 2003, Eleanor B. Sorresso Sep 2007

A Philosophy Of Privitization: Rationing Health Care Through The Medicare Modernization Act Of 2003, Eleanor B. Sorresso

Eleanor B Sorresso

Over the past two decades, managed care coverage programs have grown to dominate the private health insurance market. With the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003, managed care programs are now expanding to envelop our nation’s Medicare program as well. Proponents have based this expansion primarily on the premise that market economics provides a more efficient paradigm under which to regulate available health care resources. However, this premise of market efficiency proves problematic in the health care arena because it disregards issues of societal responsibility and the risk of socioeconomic stratification in the allocation …


Climate Change, Regulatory Fragmentation, And Water Triage, Robin K. Craig Sep 2007

Climate Change, Regulatory Fragmentation, And Water Triage, Robin K. Craig

Robin K. Craig

Fresh water is a regulatorily fragmented resource – that is, water is subject to multiple assertions of regulatory authority and to multiple types of use right claims that those authorities regulate. As fresh water supplies become increasingly unequal to task of meeting the multiple demands for both consumptive and in situ use, and as consumptive and in situ uses of water come increasingly into irreconcilable conflict, the various regulatory schemes governing water have also increasingly come into legal conflict. These courtroom battles have revealed many tensions, overlaps, and gaps in the overall governance of water as a natural resource, especially …


What Can Booker Teach Us About Chevron?, Joshua L. Sohn Sep 2007

What Can Booker Teach Us About Chevron?, Joshua L. Sohn

Joshua L. Sohn

Since 1984, courts have used the Chevron framework to review administrative agencies’ rules and regulations. However, there is an unresolved debate over how to determine when an agency interpretation of its governing statute is “reasonable” at Step 2 of Chevron. This article seeks to inform that debate by analogizing to an unlikely source: the Supreme Court’s 2005 opinion in United States v. Booker. Booker was a criminal sentencing case that may seem far removed from the interpretive question in Chevron. But the two cases are striking similar in the “reasonableness” standard that they impose on reviewing courts.

This article suggests …


No Two-Stepping In The Laboratories, Michael M. Pappas Sep 2007

No Two-Stepping In The Laboratories, Michael M. Pappas

Michael M Pappas

NO TWO-STEPPING IN THE LABORATORIES examines the deference standards the various states offer to agency statutory interpretation. The article analyzes these state examples and their implications for the federal Chevron doctrine.


Making The Sale On Contingent Valuation, Sameer H. Doshi Sep 2007

Making The Sale On Contingent Valuation, Sameer H. Doshi

Sameer H Doshi

Scholarship and jurisprudence have not seriously considered the question of whether the contingent valuation (CV) technique of monetizing preferences for non-tradeable public goods is consistent with the Daubert standards for scientific evidence. The greatest difficulty is in establishing that CV is testable and has measurable error rates; this problem is consonant with criticisms that economists have leveled at the CV method more generally. Additionally, the “state of the art” of contingent valuation practice has recommended the use of the willingness-to-pay question format for CV, rather than willingness-to-accept. This is misplaced in many cases, particularly in calculating damages in environmental tort …


Litigating Canada-U.S. Transboundary Pollution: International Environmental Lawmaking And The Threat Of Extraterritorial Reciprocity, Shi-Ling Hsu, Austen Parrish Sep 2007

Litigating Canada-U.S. Transboundary Pollution: International Environmental Lawmaking And The Threat Of Extraterritorial Reciprocity, Shi-Ling Hsu, Austen Parrish

Shi-Ling Hsu

This Article joins a spirited debate ongoing among international law scholars. Numerous articles have debated the changing nature of interna-tional law and relations: the impact of globalization, the decline of territorial-sovereignty, the ever important role that non-state actors play, and the growing use of domestic laws to solve transboundary problems. That scholarship, however, often speaks only in general theoretical terms, and has largely ignored how these changes are playing out in countries outside the United States in ways that impact American interests.

This Article picks up where that scholarship leaves off. It examines one of the perennial challenges for international …


Post-Trauma: Cambodian Refugees And Social Security's Disability Fraud Investigations, Theodore A.B. Mccombs Sep 2007

Post-Trauma: Cambodian Refugees And Social Security's Disability Fraud Investigations, Theodore A.B. Mccombs

Theodore A.B. McCombs

Since 2003, the Oakland unit of Social Security’s Cooperative Disability Investigations (“CDI”) program has targeted certain Cambodian refugee applicants with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Depression for fraud investigations. The practices of Social Security’s anti-fraud program in Oakland reveal disturbing disadvantages to Cambodian refugee applicants in particular, including institutional prejudices in Social Security’s rules and CDI agents’ gross insensitivity to claimants’ impairments and cultural realities. This Note examines these disadvantages under the legal norms of national origin discrimination, disability discrimination, and due process, and concludes with a policy proposal on how Social Security might better protect claimants’ rights and interests while …


Government Lawyers And Confidentiality Norms, Kathleen Clark Sep 2007

Government Lawyers And Confidentiality Norms, Kathleen Clark

Kathleen Clark

This article addresses the confidentiality obligations of government lawyers, and how those obligations differ from private sector lawyers. It examines the rather complex question of the identity of a government lawyer’s client, notes that many government lawyers make decisions that are normally reserved for clients, and finds that those lawyers can appropriately consider the public interest in making those decisions. On the specific issue of confidentiality, the article asserts that, as a substantive matter, government lawyers may disclose government wrongdoing and may reveal information that is subject to disclosure under freedom of information laws. But as a procedural matter, state …


Presidents And Process: A Comparison Of The Regulatory Process Under The Clinton And Bush (43) Administrations, Stuart Shapiro Sep 2007

Presidents And Process: A Comparison Of The Regulatory Process Under The Clinton And Bush (43) Administrations, Stuart Shapiro

Stuart Shapiro

Do procedural controls placed on the regulatory process allow politicians to control bureaucratic decisionmaking? I use data on the regulatory process under the Clinton and Bush Administrations to assess the differences between these presidents with distinct ideological regulatory agendas. I find that the number of comments received, the changes made between proposal and finalization of rules, the frequency with which agencies bypass notice and comment, the frequency of use of different regulatory analyses, and the time to complete a rulemaking did not vary substantially between the two presidencies. This raises questions about the role of procedural controls on agency decisionmaking.


To Speak Or Not To Speak? Navigating The Treacherous Waters Of Parallel Investigations Following The Amendment Of Federal Rule Of Evidence 408, Mikah K. Story Thompson Aug 2007

To Speak Or Not To Speak? Navigating The Treacherous Waters Of Parallel Investigations Following The Amendment Of Federal Rule Of Evidence 408, Mikah K. Story Thompson

Mikah K. Story Thompson

This article is the first to explore the true impact of the recently amended Fed. R. Evid. 408 on parallel proceedings. Parallel proceedings exist where the government conducts both a civil and criminal investigation against a defendant for single instance of alleged misconduct. Prior to the rule’s amendment, a defendant facing parallel proceedings had the ability to negotiate settlement of the civil suit without fear that any incriminating statements made during settlement talks would later re-surface in the criminal case. However, the amendment to Rule 408 singles out defendants facing parallel proceedings by stating that the government may use any …


An Empirical Investigation Of Judicial Decisionmaking, Statutory Interpretation & The Chevron Doctrine In Environmental Law, Jason J. Czarnezki Aug 2007

An Empirical Investigation Of Judicial Decisionmaking, Statutory Interpretation & The Chevron Doctrine In Environmental Law, Jason J. Czarnezki

Jason J. Czarnezki

How do the United States Courts of Appeals decide environmental cases? More specifically, how do courts evaluate decisions of statutory interpretation made by government agencies that deal in environmental law? While research on judicial decisionmaking in environmental law has primarily focused on the D.C. Circuit, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the influence of ideology, only recently have legal scholars begun to consider the role of legal factors in judicial decisionmaking in environmental law. Yet, more can be learned about environmental jurisprudence outside the District of Columbia, the “other” environmental agencies, and the influence of legal interpretive approaches and legal doctrine—as …


“Manifest” Destiny?: How Some Courts Have Fallaciously Come To Require A Greater Showing Of Congressional Intent For Jurisdictional Exhaustion Than They Require For Preemption, Colin Miller Aug 2007

“Manifest” Destiny?: How Some Courts Have Fallaciously Come To Require A Greater Showing Of Congressional Intent For Jurisdictional Exhaustion Than They Require For Preemption, Colin Miller

Colin Miller

Abstract for Colin Miller, “Manifest” Destiny?: How Some Courts Have Fallaciously Come To Require A Greater Showing Of Congressional Intent For Jurisdictional Exhaustion Than They Require For Preemption Congress engages in preemption when it enacts federal legislation that supersedes any existing state and local laws in a particular field and proscribes any future state and local regulation of that field. Because preemption repeals state and local legislative authority over traditional areas of state law, courts have understandably required that preemptive legislation evince “clear and manifest” Congressional intent to supersede state and local legislation. Conversely, when Congress includes a jurisdictional exhaustion …


Large-Scale Disasters Attacking The American Dream: How To Protect And Empower Homeowners And Lenders, Matthew D. Ekins Aug 2007

Large-Scale Disasters Attacking The American Dream: How To Protect And Empower Homeowners And Lenders, Matthew D. Ekins

Matthew D Ekins

The 2005 hurricane season reminded the world that such catastrophes can and do occur anywhere at anytime. Recovery efforts continue long after tides recede and after-shocks cease. In the context of Hurricane Katrina, this article examines the homeowner-lender relationship to determine risks natural disasters pose to the mortgage industry, likely repercussions a fallout in the mortgage industry may have on the health of the general economy, and what preventative steps have been and may be taken to prevent further economic suffering in a post-catastrophe environment.


Whither The Pickering Rights Of Federal Employees?, Paul Secunda Aug 2007

Whither The Pickering Rights Of Federal Employees?, Paul Secunda

Paul M. Secunda

As a result of the Supreme Court's 1983 decision in Bush v. Lucas, federal employees are not permitted to bring Bivens constitutional tort claims directly to federal court to vindicate their First Amendment rights to free speech under Pickering v. Bd. of Education. Instead, the Bush Court found that Congress had established an effective, alternative statutory scheme for vindication of such claims under the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (CSRA of 1978). This places federal employees in a less favorable predicament than their state and local employee counterparts who are able to directly proceed to court on their First …


Representation Reinforcement And The Court-Congress Dialogue: A Process-Based Solution To A Processed-Based Problem, Anita S. Krishnakumar Aug 2007

Representation Reinforcement And The Court-Congress Dialogue: A Process-Based Solution To A Processed-Based Problem, Anita S. Krishnakumar

Anita S. Krishnakumar

One of the most valuable — and disturbing — insights offered by public choice theory has been the recognition that wealthy, well-organized interests with narrow, intense preferences often dominate the legislative process while diffuse, unorganized interests go under-represented. Responding to this insight, legal scholars in the fields of statutory interpretation and administrative law have suggested that the solution to the problem of representational inequality lies with the courts. Indeed, over the past two decades, scholars have offered up a host of John Hart Ely-inspired representation-reinforcing “canons of construction,” designed to encourage judges to use their role as statutory interpreters to …


Neither Fish Nor Fowl: New Strategies For Selective Regulation Of Information Services, Robert M. Frieden Aug 2007

Neither Fish Nor Fowl: New Strategies For Selective Regulation Of Information Services, Robert M. Frieden

Rob Frieden

Neither Fish Nor Fowl: New Strategies for Selective Regulation of Information Services Rob Frieden Professor, Penn State University 102 Carnegie Building University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (814) 863-7996; rmf5@psu.edu web site: http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/r/m/rmf5/ The Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) has created a dichotomy between telecommunications and information services with an eye toward limiting traditional common carrier regulation to the former category. This regulatory dichotomy provides the basis for exempting most Internet-mediated services from traditional telephony regulation that requires carriers to provide nondiscriminatory network interconnection even with competitors. To support its deregulatory mission the FCC has found ways to subordinate the telecommunications components in …


Three Faces Of Deference, Paul Horwitz Aug 2007

Three Faces Of Deference, Paul Horwitz

Paul Horwitz

Deference – the substitution by a decision maker of someone else’s judgment for its own – is a pervasive tool of constitutional doctrine. But although it has been studied at more abstract levels of jurisprudence and at very specific doctrinal levels, it has received surprisingly little general attention in constitutional scholarship. This Article aims to fill that gap.

This Article makes three primary contributions to the literature. First, it provides a careful examination of deference as a doctrinal tool in constitutional law, and offers a taxonomy of deference. In particular, it suggests that deference can best be understood as relying …


The Public Network, Thomas B. Nachbar Aug 2007

The Public Network, Thomas B. Nachbar

Thomas B Nachbar

This article addresses the timely yet persistent question of how best to regulate access to telecommunications networks. Concerns that private firms may use their ownership of communications networks to their own economic advantage has led many to propose restrictions, variously referred to as “network neutrality” or “open access” proposals, on network operators. To date, the network neutrality debate has focused almost exclusively on economic arguments for or against such regulation. Taking a step back from current debates, this paper seeks to derive from established law the accepted bases for imposing nondiscrimination rules and then to work forward to ask whether …


All Sprawled Out: How The Federal Regulatory System Has Driven Unsustainable Growth, Chad Emerson Aug 2007

All Sprawled Out: How The Federal Regulatory System Has Driven Unsustainable Growth, Chad Emerson

Chad Emerson

No abstract provided.


Matching Actions To Words: The Promotion Of Tribal Soivereignty Through Negotiated Rulemaking, Joseph M. Cottle Aug 2007

Matching Actions To Words: The Promotion Of Tribal Soivereignty Through Negotiated Rulemaking, Joseph M. Cottle

Joseph M Cottle

On May 25, 2006, the National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC) proposed a new definition concerning bingo games and new classification standards for Class II games. The proposed rules likely will require Native American tribes to eliminate their Class II games or enter tribal-state negotiations to conduct Class III games. The process of proposing these rules deprived tribes of sovereignty since the tribes were not able to participate in the drafting of the proposed rules, the rules shift many Class II games to Class III games with weighty economic and political costs to tribes, and the ability to object to game …


Fitting The Pension Protection Act Of 2006 Into The Defined Contribution Paradigm, Crystal L. Lyons Jul 2007

Fitting The Pension Protection Act Of 2006 Into The Defined Contribution Paradigm, Crystal L. Lyons

Crystal L. Lyons

No abstract provided.


Local Public Entrepreneurship And Judicial Intervention In A Euro-American And Global Perspective, Fernando Christian Iaione Jul 2007

Local Public Entrepreneurship And Judicial Intervention In A Euro-American And Global Perspective, Fernando Christian Iaione

Fernando Christian Iaione

Local public entrepreneurship is a concept which encompasses a variety of activities carried out by local governments to foster local economic development. The first part of this paper puts forward local public entrepreneurship as a windfall of the right to local self-government. In the second part two cases are presented - one from EU and one from US - where local public entrepreneurship is playing a major role. However, in the EU the ECJ jurisprudence is discouraging local governments to engage in such activities thereby undermining the right to local self-government. By contrast, the US legal system actively encourages a …


Local Public Entrepreneurship And Judicial Intervention In A Euro-American And Global Perspective, Christian Iaione Jul 2007

Local Public Entrepreneurship And Judicial Intervention In A Euro-American And Global Perspective, Christian Iaione

Fernando Christian Iaione

Local public entrepreneurship is a concept which encompasses a variety of activities carried out by local governments to foster local economic development. The first part of this paper puts forward local public entrepreneurship as a windfall of the right to local self-government. In the second part two cases are presented - one from EU and one from US - where local public entrepreneurship is playing a major role. However, in the EU the ECJ jurisprudence is discouraging local governments to engage in such activities thereby undermining the right to local self-government. By contrast, the US legal system actively encourages a …


Local Public Entrepreneurship And Judicial Intervention In A Euro-American And Global Perspective, Fernando Christian Iaione Jul 2007

Local Public Entrepreneurship And Judicial Intervention In A Euro-American And Global Perspective, Fernando Christian Iaione

Fernando Christian Iaione

Local public entrepreneurship is a concept which encompasses a variety of activities carried out by local governments to foster local economic development. The first part of this paper puts forward local public entrepreneurship as a windfall of the right to local self-government. In the second part two cases are presented - one from EU and one from US - where local public entrepreneurship is playing a major role. However, in the EU the ECJ jurisprudence is discouraging local governments to engage in such activities thereby undermining the right to local self-government. By contrast, the US legal system actively encourages a …


Standing To Sue In The Absence Of Prosecution: Can A Case Be Too Controversial For Case Or Controversy?, David T. Hardy Jun 2007

Standing To Sue In The Absence Of Prosecution: Can A Case Be Too Controversial For Case Or Controversy?, David T. Hardy

David T. Hardy

The Supreme Court has recognized that, except in highly unusual situations, a plaintiff has “harm in fact,” and thus standing to sue, if a criminal statute outlaws conduct in which he intends to engage and which is arguably within the protections of the Constitution. Three Circuits have, however, evolved contradictory strings of caselaw, in which certain challenges are assessed in accord with the Supreme Court’s teachings, while other, indistinguishable, challenges are subjected to much stricter standards, standards which are almost impossible to meet. The Circuits rarely attempt to reconcile the two sets of decisions, and when they do, the resolution …


Federalism And Accountability: State Attorneys General, Regulatory Litigation, And The New Federalism, Timothy L. Meyer Jun 2007

Federalism And Accountability: State Attorneys General, Regulatory Litigation, And The New Federalism, Timothy L. Meyer

Scholarly Works

This Comment will examine how one particular state institution, state attorneys general (SAGs), has operated within a unique set of institutional and political constraints to create state-based regulation with nationwide impact in policy areas including consumer protection, antitrust, environmental regulation, and securities regulation. This state-based regulation casts doubt on one of the principle rationales advanced in the Supreme Court's anticommandeering line of cases for limiting federal power; namely, that such a move enhances electoral accountability, a concept central to our democracy. If in the absence of federal regulation a series of narrowly accountable state-based actors can create nationwide regulation in …


The Much Maligned 527 And Institutional Choice, Lloyd H. Mayer May 2007

The Much Maligned 527 And Institutional Choice, Lloyd H. Mayer

Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

The continuing controversy over “527” organizations has led Congress to impose extensive disclosure requirements on these political organizations and to consider imposing extensive restrictions on their funding as well. The debate about what laws should govern these entities has, however, so far almost completely ignored the fact that such laws raise a complicated institutional choice question. This Article seeks to resolve that question by developing a new institutional choice framework to guide this and similar choices. The Article first explores the context for making this determination by describing the current laws governing 527s, including both federal election laws administered by …


Immigration, Anti-Terrorism Measures, And National Security: Exploring The Use Of Security Certificates Under Canada’S Immigration And Refugee Protection Act (Irpa), Kamaal Zaidi May 2007

Immigration, Anti-Terrorism Measures, And National Security: Exploring The Use Of Security Certificates Under Canada’S Immigration And Refugee Protection Act (Irpa), Kamaal Zaidi

Kamaal Zaidi

In the wake of the 9-11 attacks, several nations have introduced security legislation in various forms that affected their immigration system. Security certificates are administrative tools designed to safeguard the national security of Canada by detaining individuals suspected of having links to terrorism or other forms of serious criminality. This form of detention has provided few due process rights for accused non-citizens, forming the basis of much criticism. In addressing this concern, the judiciary (through the Supreme Court of Canada and Federal Courts) has recognized the lack of due process protections afforded to these individuals, particularly in the context of …