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Full-Text Articles in Law

Geo-Politics, The ‘War On Terror’ And The Competitiveness Of The City Of London, Richard Woodward Jul 2007

Geo-Politics, The ‘War On Terror’ And The Competitiveness Of The City Of London, Richard Woodward

Books/Book Chapters

No abstract provided.


Healthy Competition: What’S Holding Back Health Care And How To Free It, Michael F. Cannon Jan 2007

Healthy Competition: What’S Holding Back Health Care And How To Free It, Michael F. Cannon

Michael F. Cannon

No abstract provided.


Structuring And Restructuring Sovereign Debt: The Role Of Seniority, Patrick Bolton, Olivier Jeanne Jan 2007

Structuring And Restructuring Sovereign Debt: The Role Of Seniority, Patrick Bolton, Olivier Jeanne

Center for Contract and Economic Organization

In an environment characterized by weak contractual enforcement, sovereign lenders can enhance the likelihood of repayment by making their claims more difficult to restructure ex post. We show, however, that competition for repayment between lenders may result in a sovereign debt that is excessively difficult to restructure in equilibrium. This inefficiency may be alleviated by a suitably designed bankruptcy regime that facilitates debt restructuring.


Copyright And Public Good Economics: A Misunderstood Relation, Christopher S. Yoo Jan 2007

Copyright And Public Good Economics: A Misunderstood Relation, Christopher S. Yoo

All Faculty Scholarship

The conventional approach to analyzing the economics of copyright is based on the premise that copyrightable works constitute pure public goods, which is generally modeled by assuming that such works are non-excludable and that the marginal cost of making additional copies of them is essentially zero. These assumptions in turn imply that markets systematically produce too few copyrightable works and underutilize those that are produced. Moreover, any attempt to alleviate the problems of underproduction necessarily exacerbates the problems of underutilization and vice versa. In this Article, Professor Christopher Yoo argues that the conventional approach is based on a fundamental misunderstanding. …


The Flood: Political Economy And Disaster, Mari J. Matsuda Jan 2007

The Flood: Political Economy And Disaster, Mari J. Matsuda

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

As summer faded to fall in 2005, a hurricane hit New Orleans, a city so unique in its history that it has more history than many American cities. It was nonetheless an American city in these telling parameters: a city of luxury alongside squalor, two-thirds Black, one-fourth poor, with the gap between its rich and poor growing at a gallop as the waters of lake and river lapped gently along aging, grass-covered levees.

Freeze the frame before the waters rise, and what do you see? A devastated public school system, where Black children are labeled “failing,” along with their schools. …


Labor Unions: A Corporatist Institution In A Competitive World, Michael L. Wachter Jan 2007

Labor Unions: A Corporatist Institution In A Competitive World, Michael L. Wachter

All Faculty Scholarship

Union membership, as a percentage of the private sector workforce, has been in decline for 50 years. I argue that the cause of this unrelenting decline is a single, fundamental factor – the change in the United States economy from a corporatist-regulated economy to one based on free competition. Most labor commentators have explained the decline by a confluence of unrelated economic and legal forces. Labor economists typically stress economic explanations, which vary from compositional shifts in the job structure to increased competition both domestically and internationally. On the other hand, labor law commentators naturally focus on labor law explanations, …


Mandatory Gun Ownership, The Militia Census Of 1806, And Background Assumptions Concerning The Early American Right To Arms: A Cautious Response To Robert Churchill, William G. Merkel Dec 2006

Mandatory Gun Ownership, The Militia Census Of 1806, And Background Assumptions Concerning The Early American Right To Arms: A Cautious Response To Robert Churchill, William G. Merkel

William G. Merkel

In "Gun Ownership in Early America," published in the William and Mary Quarterly in 2003,' Robert Churchill drew on probate inventories and militia records to make the case that arms ownership was pervasive in late colonial, revolutionary, and early national America. Churchill concluded with the observation that "[i]t is time to ponder what these guns meant to their owners and how that meaning changed over time."'2 In his substantial contribution to this volume of Law and History Review,3 Churchill takes up that challenge himself and advances the claim that widespread arms ownership engendered a sense of possessory entitlement, and that …


Economics Of Plea Bargaining, Richard Adelstein Dec 2006

Economics Of Plea Bargaining, Richard Adelstein

Richard Adelstein

A short summary of earlier work for a sociological audience.