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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

Pretextual Searches And Seizures: Alaska’S Failure To Adopt A Standard, Shardul Desai Dec 2006

Pretextual Searches And Seizures: Alaska’S Failure To Adopt A Standard, Shardul Desai

Alaska Law Review

No abstract provided.


Searches & The Misunderstood History Of Suspicion & Probable Cause: Part One, Fabio Arcila Sep 2006

Searches & The Misunderstood History Of Suspicion & Probable Cause: Part One, Fabio Arcila

ExpressO

This article, the first of a two-part series, argues that during the Framers’ era many if not most judges believed they could issue search warrants without independently assessing the adequacy of probable cause, and that this view persisted even after the Fourth Amendment became effective. This argument challenges the leading originalist account of the Fourth Amendment, which Professor Thomas Davies published in the Michigan Law Review in 1999.

The focus in this first article is upon an analysis of the common law and how it reflected the Fourth Amendment’s restrictions. Learned treatises in particular, and to a lesser extent a …


The Liberal Assault On The Fourth Amendment, Christopher Slobogin Aug 2006

The Liberal Assault On The Fourth Amendment, Christopher Slobogin

ExpressO

The Liberal Assault on the Fourth Amendment Christopher Slobogin As construed by the Supreme Court, the Fourth Amendment’s reasonableness requirement regulates overt, non-regulatory government searches of homes, cars, and personal effects–-and virtually nothing else. This essay is primarily about how we got to this point. It is fashionable to place much of the blame for today’s law on the Warren Court’s adoption of the malleable expectation of privacy concept as the core value protected by the Fourth Amendment. But this diagnosis fails to explain why even the more liberal justices have often gone along with many of the privacy-diminishing holdings …


Searches And The Misunderstood History Of Suspicion And Probable Cause: Part One, Fabio Arcila Aug 2006

Searches And The Misunderstood History Of Suspicion And Probable Cause: Part One, Fabio Arcila

ExpressO

This article, the first of a two-part series, argues that during the Framers’ era many if not most judges believed they could issue search warrants without independently assessing the adequacy of probable cause, and that this view persisted even after the Fourth Amendment became effective. This argument challenges the leading originalist account of the Fourth Amendment, which Professor Thomas Davies published in the Michigan Law Review in 1999.

The focus in this first article is upon an analysis of the common law and how it reflected the Fourth Amendment’s restrictions. Learned treatises in particular, and to a lesser extent a …


Detector Dogs And Probable Cause, Richard E. Myers Mar 2006

Detector Dogs And Probable Cause, Richard E. Myers

ExpressO

In this Article, Professor Myers argues that an alert, even by a well-trained dog with an excellent track record in the field, cannot by itself constitute probable cause to search. By using a Bayesian analysis of the value of dog alerts, he demonstrates that additional evidence is needed before probable cause exists. He shows why police won’t make changes to their use of dogs without outside prodding, and explores who might do so. The article makes some suggestions that, if adopted, will improve the courts’ approach to detector dog technologies, allowing them to better strike the balance between the competing …


Racial Profiling In Texas Department Of Public Safety Traffic Stops: Race Aware Or Race Benign., Steven R. Wolfson Mar 2006

Racial Profiling In Texas Department Of Public Safety Traffic Stops: Race Aware Or Race Benign., Steven R. Wolfson

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

It is illegal for Texas law enforcement agencies to racially profile people. However, Texas continues to deal with racial profiling among law enforcement officers. This article concerns the right to travel, unmolested by state action based upon race or ethnicity. Since passing the Fourteenth Amendment and its Equal Protection Clause, our legal system under-includes, and outright excludes, certain groups of people from its promise. Such racial disparities have lived in the United States Constitution since the authors drafted the three-fifths compromise at its inception. When considering the criminality of a group of people and the overpopulation in state prisons, many …


Declining To State A Name In Consideration Of The Fifth Amendment's Self-Incrimination Clause And Law Enforcement Databases After Hiibel, Joseph R. Ashby Feb 2006

Declining To State A Name In Consideration Of The Fifth Amendment's Self-Incrimination Clause And Law Enforcement Databases After Hiibel, Joseph R. Ashby

Michigan Law Review

In response to a report of an argument on a public sidewalk, a police officer approaches two people standing in the vicinity of the reported dispute. The officer requests that each person provide her name so the officer can run the names through databases to which the police department subscribes. After searching each name through various databases, the officer might discover that one of the individuals made several purchases of cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine and that the other just received a license from the State to procure certain hazardous chemicals. These two people might be in the early stages of …


Whose Candy Are We Really Taking? An Exploration Of The Candyman Cases And The Divide Within The Second Circuit, Lauren E. Curry Jan 2006

Whose Candy Are We Really Taking? An Exploration Of The Candyman Cases And The Divide Within The Second Circuit, Lauren E. Curry

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Reasonable Policeman: Police Intent In Criminal Procedure, Craig M. Bradley Jan 2006

The Reasonable Policeman: Police Intent In Criminal Procedure, Craig M. Bradley

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.