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Full-Text Articles in Law

Independent Invention As A Defense To Patent Infringement, Samson Vermont Dec 2006

Independent Invention As A Defense To Patent Infringement, Samson Vermont

Michigan Law Review

Under current law, independent invention is no defense to patent infringement. This Article argues that independent invention should be a defense, provided the independent inventor creates the invention before receiving actual or constructive notice that someone else already created it. The defense reduces wasteful duplication of effort and enhances dissemination of inventions without lowering the incentive to invent below the necessary minimum. To be sure, the defense lowers the incentive for inventions that face significant odds of being invented by more than one inventor By enabling a second inventor to compete with a first inventor the defense essentially breaks up ...


The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael D. Mann Jun 2006

The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael D. Mann

ExpressO

This Comment discusses how television shows such as CSI and Law & Order create heightened juror expectations. This will be published in the Buffalo Public Interest Law Journal's 2005-2006 issue.


The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael Mann Jun 2006

The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael Mann

Michael D. Mann

This Comment explores how television shows such as CSI and Law & Order have created heightened juror expectations in courtrooms across America. Surprise acquitals often have prosectors scratching their heads as jurors hold them to this new "Hollywood" standard. The Comment also analyzes the CSI phenomena by reflecting on past legal television shows that have influenced the public's perception of the legal profession and how the "CSI effect" has placed an even greater burden on parties to proffer some kind of forensic evidence at trial.

The Comment was published in volume 24 of the Buffalo Public Interest Law Journal (2006).


Group Status And Criminal Defenses: Logical Relationship Or Marriage Of Convenience, Eugene R. Melhizer Jun 2006

Group Status And Criminal Defenses: Logical Relationship Or Marriage Of Convenience, Eugene R. Melhizer

Missouri Law Review

Section I provides a brief overview of the significance of group status generally and its traditional relevance and usage within the criminal justice system. This discussion places the novel, defense-oriented approach to group status in a proper historical and analytical context. Section II begins by sketching a generally accepted system of defenses and placing general defenses within this context. It next describes the proper understanding of justification and excuse, the two preeminent theories for exculpatory general defenses. This complicated and often-contentious area of law is exposited here only insofar as it is necessary to lay the groundwork for the critique ...


Superstition-Based Injustice In Africa And The United States: The Use Of Provocation As A Defense For Killing Witches And Homosexuals, Jennifer Dumin Jan 2006

Superstition-Based Injustice In Africa And The United States: The Use Of Provocation As A Defense For Killing Witches And Homosexuals, Jennifer Dumin

ExpressO

This Article examines two different instances where strong cultural and religious beliefs suggest that an individual is justified in taking another’s life. Focusing primarily on South Africa and the United States, it argues that the rationale used to defend those who kill suspected witches and those who kill suspected homosexuals is the same – merely because a criminal holds a belief that the victim is evil, the criminal is somehow entitled to a lesser punishment. In the United States, those who readily recognize the absurdity of the witchcraft defense may have some difficulty in recognizing the same level of absurdity ...


The Insanity Defense: History And Problems, James F. Hooper, M.D. Jan 2006

The Insanity Defense: History And Problems, James F. Hooper, M.D.

Saint Louis University Public Law Review

No abstract provided.


Attacks On Executives: Revival Of The Invasion Of Management Defense And Public Utility Autonomy, Thomas R. Dowling Jan 2006

Attacks On Executives: Revival Of The Invasion Of Management Defense And Public Utility Autonomy, Thomas R. Dowling

Saint Louis University Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Resurrecting "Romantics At War": International Self-Defense In The Shadow Of The Law Of War-Where Are The Borders?, Mohammed Saif-Alden Wattad Jan 2006

Resurrecting "Romantics At War": International Self-Defense In The Shadow Of The Law Of War-Where Are The Borders?, Mohammed Saif-Alden Wattad

ILSA Journal of International & Comparative Law

Rules relating to the use of force are among the traditional concerns of international law.


The Scientific Shortcomings Of Roper V. Simmons, Deborah W. Denno Jan 2006

The Scientific Shortcomings Of Roper V. Simmons, Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

This Article contends that some of the case law and social science research that form the basis for the United States Supreme Court's decision in Roper v. Simmons are insufficient and outdated. The Court also relies heavily upon briefs submitted by the respondent and his amici, in lieu of providing more pertinent citations and analysis that could have enhanced and modernized the Court's arguments. The sparse and sometimes archaic sources for Roper potentially limit the opinion's precedential value. For example, the Court cites Erik Erikson's 1968 book, Identity: Youth and Crisis, to support the view that ...


Revisiting The Legal Link Between Genetics And Crime, Deborah W. Denno Jan 2006

Revisiting The Legal Link Between Genetics And Crime, Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

Unwarranted constraints on the admissibility of genetics evidence in death penalty cases can undercut some defendants' efforts to fight their executions. For example, genetics evidence can help validate some traditionally accepted mitigating factors (such as certain psychiatric or behavioral disorders) that can otherwise be difficult for defendants to prove. By imposing unreasonable limitations on genetics arguments, the criminal justice system may be undermining the very principles and progressive thinking the cap on genetics evidence was originally intended to achieve. Part II of this article briefly reviews the facts and legal arguments in Mobley v. State. Part III addresses the primary ...