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Full-Text Articles in Law

Crystals, Mud, Bapcpa, And The Structure Of Bankruptcy Decisionmaking, R. Wilson Freyermuth Oct 2006

Crystals, Mud, Bapcpa, And The Structure Of Bankruptcy Decisionmaking, R. Wilson Freyermuth

Faculty Publications

A critical feature of any legal system is its formal dispute resolution mechanism. From the perspective of a transactions lawyer, the dispute resolution process should be structured to accomplish (or at least contribute positively toward) doctrinal clarity.


Due Process And Punitive Damages: The Error Of Federal Excessiveness Jurisprudence, A. Benjamin Spencer Jul 2006

Due Process And Punitive Damages: The Error Of Federal Excessiveness Jurisprudence, A. Benjamin Spencer

Faculty Publications

The Supreme Court, in a line of several cases over the past decade, has established a rigorous federal constitutional excessiveness review for punitive damages awards based on the Due Process Clause. As a matter of substantive due process, says the Court, punitive awards must be evaluated by three "guideposts" set forth in BMW of North America v. Gore: the degree of reprehensibility of the defendant's conduct, the ratio between punitive and compensatory damages, and a comparison of the amount of punitive damages to any "civil or criminal penalties that could be imposed for comparable misconduct." Following up on this ...


Building The Emotionally Learned Negotiator, Erin Ryan Apr 2006

Building The Emotionally Learned Negotiator, Erin Ryan

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Modernizing Security In Rents: The New Uniform Assignment Of Rents Act, R. Wilson Freyermuth Jan 2006

Modernizing Security In Rents: The New Uniform Assignment Of Rents Act, R. Wilson Freyermuth

Faculty Publications

This article explains the provisions of the UARA and encourages its prompt adoption in states that presently lack comprehensive statutes governing security interests in rents.


Enforcement Of Arbitral Awards Against Foreign States Or State Agencies, S. I. Strong Jan 2006

Enforcement Of Arbitral Awards Against Foreign States Or State Agencies, S. I. Strong

Faculty Publications

Britain's Lord Denning once said that “as a moth is drawn to the light, so is a litigant drawn to the United States.” Certainly, as a pro-arbitration state and a signatory to various international conventions concerning the enforcement of foreign arbitral awards, the United States seems a natural place to bring an action to enforce an arbitral award against a foreign state or state agency. However, suing a sovereign has not traditionally been a simple task in the United States or elsewhere. Most nations grant foreign states the presumption of immunity, thus denying that their domestic courts have jurisdiction ...


The Democratic Legitimacy Of Government-Related Dispute Resolution, Richard C. Reuben Jan 2006

The Democratic Legitimacy Of Government-Related Dispute Resolution, Richard C. Reuben

Faculty Publications

The elective branches get most of the attention when we think about democracy. But it's important to remember that one of the things that a democratic government provides is a number of structures by which disputes may be resolved peacefully. Indeed, voting itself is one way of resolving conflict at a societal level. In the United States, courts historically have been the starting point for the resolution of individual, and sometimes social, disputes. Courts would seem to exude a great deal of democratic legitimacy, but why, and under what conditions? And what about other methods of dispute resolution: How ...


Confidentiality In Arbitration: Beyond The Myth, Richard C. Reuben Jan 2006

Confidentiality In Arbitration: Beyond The Myth, Richard C. Reuben

Faculty Publications

Many people assume that arbitration is private and confidential. But is that assumption accurate? This article is the first to explore that question in the important context of whether arbitration communications can be discovered and admitted into evidence in other legal proceedings - a question that is just beginning to show up in the cases. It first surveys the federal and state statutory and case law, finding that arbitration communications in fact are generally discoverable and admissible. It then considers the normative desirability of discovering and admitting arbitration communications evidence, concluding that the free discovery and admissibility of arbitration communications would ...


Transformed, Not Transcended: The Role Of Extrajudicial Dispute Resolution In Antebellum Kentucky And New Jersey, Carli N. Conklin Jan 2006

Transformed, Not Transcended: The Role Of Extrajudicial Dispute Resolution In Antebellum Kentucky And New Jersey, Carli N. Conklin

Faculty Publications

The purpose of this paper is to explore the applicability of that conclusion to two states not studied by Horwitz: Kentucky and New Jersey. The study of Kentucky, a state that was largely agricultural in the antebellum period, will provide a case study for the argument that the destruction of arbitration in antebellum America was mainly due to a merchant-lawyer alliance.


Introduction To Vanishing Trial Symposium, John M. Lande Jan 2006

Introduction To Vanishing Trial Symposium, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

This symposium shows that "vanishing trial" phenomena touch an extremely broad range of issues including transformations of society, courts, dispute resolution procedures, and even the nature of knowledge. These phenomena relate to decisions by litigants in particular cases, court systems, national policy, and international relations. This subject is too large and complex for any symposium to analyze fully, especially at this early stage of analysis. This symposium makes an important contribution to this study, with theories and evidence about the existence, nature, and extent of reductions in trials and similar proceedings. It elaborates a range of theories about possible causes ...


Untangling The Privacy Paradox In Arbitration, Amy J. Schmitz Jan 2006

Untangling The Privacy Paradox In Arbitration, Amy J. Schmitz

Faculty Publications

Arbitration is private but not secret. This truism regarding arbitration seems contradictory and nonsensical. However, common understandings of privacy in arbitration often lull individuals into assuming personal information revealed in arbitration may not become public. They assume privacy and confidentiality are synonymous. The reality is that arbitration is private but not necessarily confidential, or secret. This is the privacy paradox: it defies common conceptions of arbitration's secrecy, but is nonetheless true. This paradox is problematic because it leads to shortsighted contracting and simplistic assumptions about arbitral justice. Moreover, it may foster injustice when repeat players unduly benefit from unpublished ...