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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Need For Closed Circuit Television In Mass Transit Systems, Michael Greenberger Feb 2006

The Need For Closed Circuit Television In Mass Transit Systems, Michael Greenberger

Faculty Scholarship

Closed circuit television video (CCTV) surveillance systems need to be introduced or enhanced in the public areas within United States’ mass transit systems. London’s extensive system was used very successfully in the investigation of the July 2005 terrorist attacks on its subway and bus systems. That effective investigatory use of CCTV is very likely to be a significant deterrence to future terrorist activities on London mass transit. The United States must be prepared in the event of similar attacks on its soil. As roughly twenty times more people travel by mass transit than by air, it is time for this …


The People's Agent: Executive Branch Secrecy And Accountability In An Age Of Terrorism, Sidney A. Shapiro, Rena I. Steinzor Jan 2006

The People's Agent: Executive Branch Secrecy And Accountability In An Age Of Terrorism, Sidney A. Shapiro, Rena I. Steinzor

Faculty Scholarship

The increase in government secrecy is an important and troubling policy trend. Although the trend predates the 2000 presidential election, the movement towards government secrecy has accelerated dramatically in the Bush Administration. The case for open government is usually based on political principles embraced by the Framers of the U.S. Constitution. This article seeks to bolster these arguments by applying “agency theory” to the question of how much secrecy is too much. While agency theory is most often used to analyze private sector economic relationships, commentators have also applied it to the analysis of methods for holding legislators and Executive …


Waging War Against Terror: An Essay For Sandy Levinson, Philip Chase Bobbitt Jan 2006

Waging War Against Terror: An Essay For Sandy Levinson, Philip Chase Bobbitt

Faculty Scholarship

Wars are acts of State, and therefore there has never been a "war on terror." Of course states have fought terrorism, in many guises, for centuries. But a war on terror had to await the development of states – including virtual states like al Qaeda's global ummah – whose constitutional order was not confined to a particular territory or national group and for whom terror could therefore be a permanent state of international affairs, either sought in order to prevent persons within a state's control from resisting oppression by accessing global, empowering resources and networks, or suffered because other states …


Muslim Profiles Post-9/11: Is Racial Profiling An Effective Counterterrorist Measure And Does It Violate The Right To Be Free From Discrimination?, Bernard E. Harcourt Jan 2006

Muslim Profiles Post-9/11: Is Racial Profiling An Effective Counterterrorist Measure And Does It Violate The Right To Be Free From Discrimination?, Bernard E. Harcourt

Faculty Scholarship

Racial profiling as a defensive counterterrorism measure necessarily implicates a rights trade-off: if effective, racial profiling limits the right of young Muslim men to be free from discrimination in order to promote the security and well-being of others. Proponents of racial profiling argue that it is based on simple statistical fact and represents just smart law enforcement. Opponents of racial profiling, like New York City police commissioner Raymond Kelly, say that it is dangerous and just nuts.

As a theoretical matter, both sides are partly right. Racial profiling in the context of counterterrorism measures may increase the detection of terrorist …


Optimal Liability For Terrorism, Darius N. Lakdawalla, Eric L. Talley Jan 2006

Optimal Liability For Terrorism, Darius N. Lakdawalla, Eric L. Talley

Faculty Scholarship

This paper analyzes the normative role for civil liability in aligning terrorism precaution incentives, when the perpetrators of terrorism are unreachable by courts or regulators. We consider the strategic interaction among targets, subsidiary victims, and terrorists within a sequential, game-theoretic model. The model reveals that, while an "optimal" liability regime indeed exists, its features appear at odds with conventional legal templates. For example, it frequently prescribes damages payments from seemingly unlikely defendants, directing them to seemingly unlikely plaintiffs. The challenge of introducing such a regime using existing tort law doctrines, therefore, is likely to be prohibitive. Instead, we argue, efficient …


Issues In Article Iii Courts, Debra A. Livingston Jan 2006

Issues In Article Iii Courts, Debra A. Livingston

Faculty Scholarship

Cases implicating classified information can pose difficult legal issues for Article III courts, and these issues may well grow more complicated and arise more frequently as the global war on terror continues. The manner in which these issues are resolved has profound implications for the national security, for the procedural rights of litigants, and for the public's ability to scrutinize legal proceedings. Indeed, the expanded use of secret evidence in Article III courts may raise questions about the very character of the courts themselves. Is there a point at which the demands placed upon these courts, pushing them in the …