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2006

Medical Jurisprudence

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Articles 1 - 30 of 77

Full-Text Articles in Law

Justice Ginsburg's Fiduciary Loophole: A Viable Achilles' Heel To Hmos' Impenetrable Erisa Shield, Charlotte Johnson Dec 2006

Justice Ginsburg's Fiduciary Loophole: A Viable Achilles' Heel To Hmos' Impenetrable Erisa Shield, Charlotte Johnson

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


New Differences Between Negligence And Strict Liability And Their Implications On Medical Malpractice Reform, Noam Sher Dec 2006

New Differences Between Negligence And Strict Liability And Their Implications On Medical Malpractice Reform, Noam Sher

ExpressO

The present article seeks to explore previously undiscussed differences between the negligence and strict liability rules and thereby examine the required medical liability reform, if such reform is indeed required. Our main thesis is that negligence as a basis for liability entails a unique mechanism, which is essentially different than the strict liability mechanism, and is more efficient for several reasons, related to the legal function of resolving partial information problems which cause partial failure in the healthcare market. Among other things, the negligence mechanism (1) motivates the parties to a potential damages claim to invest in information gathering; (2) …


Hepatitis C In Prisons: Evolving Toward Decency Through Adequate Medical Care And Public Health Reform, Andrew Brunsden Dec 2006

Hepatitis C In Prisons: Evolving Toward Decency Through Adequate Medical Care And Public Health Reform, Andrew Brunsden

Articles & Chapters

Hepatitis C (HCV) in prisons is a public health crisis tied to current drug policy's emphasis on the mass incarceration of drug users. Prison policy acts as a barrier to HCV care by limiting medical care for the infected, especially drug users, and by inhibiting public health measures addressing the epidemic. This Comment argues that courts mistakenly limit prisoners' Eighth Amendment right to basic medical care when they defer to prisons that apply HCV policies as categorical rules of treatment. Where current standards of care mandate individualized patient evaluation for treatment, prison policies that eschew this principle exhibit deliberate indifference …


Medical Malpractice Law, Kathleen M. Mccauley, Dana A. Dews Nov 2006

Medical Malpractice Law, Kathleen M. Mccauley, Dana A. Dews

University of Richmond Law Review

With President George W. Bush's promise to continue working toward tort reform, medical malpractice issues are once again garnering media and voter attention. This article examines recent judicial decisions and statutory amendments affecting patients and health care providers in the commonwealth in the context of medical malpractice law.


Of Apples And Trees: Adoption And Informed Consent, Ellen Wertheimer Nov 2006

Of Apples And Trees: Adoption And Informed Consent, Ellen Wertheimer

Working Paper Series

This article argues that the doctrine of informed consent should apply to the process of adopting a child. There is substantial evidence that all adopted children are at higher risk of learning disabilities and mental health problems than nonadopted children. The article first summarizes the social science evidence demonstrating these risks and discusses some of the reasons why more extensive studies have not yet been done. The article then turns to the law of informed consent as created and applied in the contexts of medicine and law, and concludes that informed consent doctrine should apply to the process of adoption. …


A Complete Property Right Amendment, John H. Ryskamp Oct 2006

A Complete Property Right Amendment, John H. Ryskamp

ExpressO

The trend of the eminent domain reform and "Kelo plus" initiatives is toward a comprehensive Constitutional property right incorporating the elements of level of review, nature of government action, and extent of compensation. This article contains a draft amendment which reflects these concerns.


Brain Imaging And Privacy: How Recent Advances In Neuroimaging Implicate Privacy Concerns , David P. Finn Sep 2006

Brain Imaging And Privacy: How Recent Advances In Neuroimaging Implicate Privacy Concerns , David P. Finn

ExpressO

This paper deals with recent advances in neuroimaging technologies which could begin to implicate privacy concerns in the near future.


Biopolitics At The Bedside: Proxy Wars And Feeding Tubes, Joshua E. Perry Sep 2006

Biopolitics At The Bedside: Proxy Wars And Feeding Tubes, Joshua E. Perry

ExpressO

In the aftermath of Terri Schiavo’s dramatic final weeks of life, George Annas speculated that proponents of “culture of life” politics might “now view [themselves] as strong enough to generate new laws . . . to require that incompetent patients be kept alive with artificially delivered fluids and nutrition.” Indeed, Professor Annas’ prescience has been demonstrated by the post-Schiavo introduction in two dozen state legislatures of over fifty different bills making it more onerous to remove a patient’s artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH). With minor exception, however, most of the proposed legislation has either stalled or been watered down, prompting …


Hedonic Damages, Hedonic Adaptation, And Disability, Samuel R. Bagenstos, Margo Schlanger Sep 2006

Hedonic Damages, Hedonic Adaptation, And Disability, Samuel R. Bagenstos, Margo Schlanger

ExpressO

This article contributes to the broad debate over “adaptive preferences” in law, economics, and political philosophy by addressing an important ongoing controversy in tort law. Hedonic damages compensate for the lost enjoyment of life that results from a tortious injury. Lawyers seeking hedonic damages in personal injury cases emphasize their clients’ new status as compromised and damaged persons, and courts frequently uphold jury verdicts awarding hedonic damages to individuals who experienced disabling injuries based on a view that disability necessarily limits one’s enjoyment of life. This view is consonant with a general societal understanding of disability as a tragedy and …


Extended Work Duration And The Risk Of Self-Reported Percutaneous Injuries In Interns, Dean M. Hashimoto, Najib T. Ayas, Laura K. Barger, Brian E. Cade, Bernard Rosner, John W. Cronin, Frank E. Speizer, Charles A. Czeisler Sep 2006

Extended Work Duration And The Risk Of Self-Reported Percutaneous Injuries In Interns, Dean M. Hashimoto, Najib T. Ayas, Laura K. Barger, Brian E. Cade, Bernard Rosner, John W. Cronin, Frank E. Speizer, Charles A. Czeisler

Dean M. Hashimoto

Context: In their first year of postgraduate training, interns commonly work shifts that are longer than 24 hours. Extended-duration work shifts are associated with increased risks of automobile crash, particularly during a commute from work. Interns may be at risk for other occupation-related injuries.

Objective: To assess the relationship between extended work duration and rates of percutaneous injuries in a diverse population of interns in the United States.

Design, Setting, and Participants: National prospective cohort study of 2737 of the estimated 18 447 interns in US postgraduate residency programs from July 2002 through May 2003. Each month, comprehensive Web-based surveys …


The Final Battle For Preemption: The Fda And Prescription Drug Labeling Product Liability Actions, Mary J. Davis Aug 2006

The Final Battle For Preemption: The Fda And Prescription Drug Labeling Product Liability Actions, Mary J. Davis

ExpressO

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has promulgated a new regulation which revises the format for prescription drug labeling, and, in the process, has taken the position that the regulation displaces, or preempts, state products liability laws that seek to assess liability on the manufacturer for a label’s warning adequacy. In the FDA’s 100 year history, it has not taken the position that federal prescription drug labeling regulations preempt common law tort claims until the last few years, beginning with Motus v. Pfizer in 2002. This position, radical to many and rational to others, places federal preemption of prescription drug …


In Sickness, Health, And Cyberspace: Protecting The Security Of Electronic Private Health Information, Sharona Hoffman, Andy Podgurski Aug 2006

In Sickness, Health, And Cyberspace: Protecting The Security Of Electronic Private Health Information, Sharona Hoffman, Andy Podgurski

ExpressO

The electronic processing of health information provides considerable benefits to patients and health care providers at the same time that it creates serious risks to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data. The Internet provides a conduit for rapid and uncontrolled dispersion and trafficking of illicitly-obtained private health information, with far-reaching consequences to the unsuspecting victims. In order to address such threats to electronic private health information, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services enacted the HIPAA Security Rule, which thus far has received little attention in the legal literature. This article presents a critique of the Security …


Why It Is Time To Eliminate Genomic Patents, Together With Natural Extracts Doctrine That Have Supported Such Patents, Allen K. Yu Jul 2006

Why It Is Time To Eliminate Genomic Patents, Together With Natural Extracts Doctrine That Have Supported Such Patents, Allen K. Yu

ExpressO

The constitutional purpose of intellectual property is to “promote the progress of science and useful arts.” Given the utilitarian basis of patents, it is critical that policies and laws must be continually adjusted to reflect the needs of new technologies. When the law tries to shield itself from rather than confront the realities of underlying technologies, patents end up actually subverting rather than promote technological progress. This paper explores why the natural extracts doctrine belongs to the class of doctrines that subvert progress. The doctrine, established over a century ago to enable the patenting of purified compounds for use as …


Drugged, Carl E. Schneider Jul 2006

Drugged, Carl E. Schneider

Articles

The Supreme Court's recent decision in Gonzales v. Oregon, like its decision last year in Gonzales v. Raich (the "medical marijuana" case), again raises questions about the bioethical consequences of the Controlled Substances Act. When, in 1970, Congress passed that act, it placed problematic drugs in one of five "schedules," and it authorized the U.S. attorney general to add or subtract drugs from the schedules. Drugs in schedule II have both a medical use and a high potential for abuse. Doctors may prescribe such drugs if they "obtain from the Attorney General a registration issued in accordance with the …


Bond Repudiation, Tax Codes, The Appropriations Process And Restitution Post-Eminent Domain Reform, John H. Ryskamp Jun 2006

Bond Repudiation, Tax Codes, The Appropriations Process And Restitution Post-Eminent Domain Reform, John H. Ryskamp

ExpressO

This brief comment suggests where the anti-eminent domain movement might be heading next.


Recombinant Proteins Containing Repeating Units, Qi Wang, Zhonghon Guan, Brendan O. Baggot, Kristen Hadfield, Jianmin Zhao, Janice Edwards Jun 2006

Recombinant Proteins Containing Repeating Units, Qi Wang, Zhonghon Guan, Brendan O. Baggot, Kristen Hadfield, Jianmin Zhao, Janice Edwards

Brendan O. Baggot

Methods for the production of recombinant proteins containing repeating units are disclosed. Also disclosed are methods for the production of degenerate polynucleotides encoding said recombinant proteins. In addition, polypeptides and polynucleotides produced by the methods of current invention are also disclosed.


Psychiatric Patients' Human Rights: With A Case Study Of Abbasiya Hospital-Cairo, Egypt, Nada Ibrahim Hamdan Jun 2006

Psychiatric Patients' Human Rights: With A Case Study Of Abbasiya Hospital-Cairo, Egypt, Nada Ibrahim Hamdan

Archived Theses and Dissertations

No abstract provided.


Appointed Member Of The Advisory Board On Science And Technology Of The Flaschner Judicial Institute, Dean Hashimoto May 2006

Appointed Member Of The Advisory Board On Science And Technology Of The Flaschner Judicial Institute, Dean Hashimoto

Dean M. Hashimoto

No abstract provided.


Stealing What's Free: Exploring Compensation To Body Parts Sources For Their Contribution To Profitable Biomedical Research, Jo-Anne Yau May 2006

Stealing What's Free: Exploring Compensation To Body Parts Sources For Their Contribution To Profitable Biomedical Research, Jo-Anne Yau

ExpressO

It is undisputed in the biotechnology industry that human body parts play a vital role in research. The body parts donors, referred to as "Sources" in this article, are subjected to physical and financial exploitation. Forbidding the explosion of profits from trickling down to the Source presents an irrational inequity. Despite established law, it is evident from case analysis, prevailing social practices, and constitutional interpretation that Source compensation is a plausible solution.

This article proposes a model of compensation for Sources, whereby Sources are compensated based on a proportionate share of the research profits set aside for the Source as …


Finding New Constitutional Rights Through The Supreme Court’S Evolving “Government Purpose” Test Under Minimum Scrutiny, John H. Ryskamp May 2006

Finding New Constitutional Rights Through The Supreme Court’S Evolving “Government Purpose” Test Under Minimum Scrutiny, John H. Ryskamp

ExpressO

By now we all are familiar with the litany of cases which refused to find elevated scrutiny for so-called “affirmative” or “social” rights such as education, welfare or housing: Lindsey v. Normet, San Antonio School District v. Rodriguez, Dandridge v. Williams, DeShaney v. Winnebago County. There didn’t seem to be anything in minimum scrutiny which could protect such facts as education or housing, from government action. However, unobtrusively and over the years, the Supreme Court has clarified and articulated one aspect of minimum scrutiny which holds promise for vindicating facts. You will recall that under minimum scrutiny government’s action is …


Million Dollar Medical Malpractice Cases In Florida: Post-Verdict And Pre-Suit Settlements, Neil Vidmar, Kara Mackillop, Paul Lee May 2006

Million Dollar Medical Malpractice Cases In Florida: Post-Verdict And Pre-Suit Settlements, Neil Vidmar, Kara Mackillop, Paul Lee

Vanderbilt Law Review

Beginning around the year 2000, the cost of medical liability insurance for doctors sharply increased, allegedly doubling in some specialties. As a result, medical malpractice litigation has once again occupied center stage in public debate about tort reform.' Large jury verdicts are cited by insurers, physicians, and defense attorneys as unwarranted and corruptive of the medical system because they set the bargaining rate around which plaintiff and defense lawyers negotiate settlements. One of the most commonly proposed remedies is a cap on the amount that can be awarded for general damages, often called "non-economic damages" or "pain and suffering," following …


Dishonest Medical Mistakes, Maxwell J. Mehlman May 2006

Dishonest Medical Mistakes, Maxwell J. Mehlman

Vanderbilt Law Review

In the medical liability wars, physicians like to think that they are the ones in the trenches. Yet the true soldiers, of course, are the patients. As patients seek to avoid the barrage of malpractice reforms and the spoliation of managed care, one of their key refuges-the fiduciary duty of health care professionals-is being assailed from a number of directions. This Article describes these attacks and suggests how best to thwart them.

Imagine that you are seriously ill and go to a doctor. If you are like most patients these days, you are enrolled in some form of managed care. …


"Judicial Hellholes:" Medical Malpractice Claims, Verdicts And The "Doctor Exodus" In Illinois, Neil Vidmar, Russell M. Robinson Ii, Kara Mackillop May 2006

"Judicial Hellholes:" Medical Malpractice Claims, Verdicts And The "Doctor Exodus" In Illinois, Neil Vidmar, Russell M. Robinson Ii, Kara Mackillop

Vanderbilt Law Review

Beginning about the year 2000, physicians around the nation experienced an explosive jump in their professional medical liability insurance premiums. The state of Illinois has been identified as one of the "crisis" states by the American Medical Association ("AMA") insofar as cost and availability of liability insurance is concerned. Madison and St. Clair counties, just across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, have garnered particular attention, acquiring the label "judicial hellhole" for medical malpractice claims. The notoriety is so great that President Bush visited Madison County in January 2005 as part of his campaign for a nationwide $250,000 cap on …


Medical Malpractice Standard-Setting: Developing Malpractice "Safe Harbors" As A New Role For Qios?, James F. Blumstein May 2006

Medical Malpractice Standard-Setting: Developing Malpractice "Safe Harbors" As A New Role For Qios?, James F. Blumstein

Vanderbilt Law Review

Concern about medical malpractice issues has reemerged, again stemming from escalating costs in some geographic regions and sectors of medical practice. The Bush Administration has (so far unsuccessfully) supported a cap on noneconomic loss as a strategy for coping with the cost aspects of those medical malpractice concerns, the model being the California approach.

Although the overall initiative for reform has considerable merit, the damage-cap has its opponents and its drawbacks. The damage-cap approach is remedy-centric, focusing on the scope of remedy as a vehicle for containing costs in the area of medical malpractice. By concentrating on remedies, the reform …


Putting The Caps On Caps: Reconciling The Goal Of Medical Malpractice Reform With The Twin Objectives Of Tort Law, Kyle Miller May 2006

Putting The Caps On Caps: Reconciling The Goal Of Medical Malpractice Reform With The Twin Objectives Of Tort Law, Kyle Miller

Vanderbilt Law Review

Medical malpractice litigation is not a modern invention. Rather, it has been part of the American legal system since before the Revolution,1 and the most recent medical malpractice insurance crisis is not the first this country has known. However, losses to insurers during the earlier medical malpractice insurance crises pale in comparison to the ailments of this most recent crisis.2 Though this most recent medical malpractice insurance crisis seems to be coming to a close,3 by examining the causes of this crisis and enacting changes at present, this country may be able to avoid future crises. Of course, the first …


Medical Malpractice Litigation And Tort Reform: It's The Incentives, Stupid, David A. Hyman, Charles Silver May 2006

Medical Malpractice Litigation And Tort Reform: It's The Incentives, Stupid, David A. Hyman, Charles Silver

Vanderbilt Law Review

Health care providers and tort reformers invariably claim that the medical malpractice litigation system is rife with behaviors that are irrational, unpredictable, and counter-productive. They attack civil juries, asserting that verdicts are skyrocketing without reason, are highly variable, and bear little or no relation to the merits of plaintiffs' claims. They complain about patients, arguing that the few with valid claims sue rarely, while the many who receive non- negligent treatment sue all the time. They attack greedy lawyers, alleging that they rake in obscene profits by routinely filing frivolous complaints. They complain that compensation flows almost randomly, winding up …


Rethinking Peer Review: Detecting And Addressing Medical Malpractice Claims Risk, Ilene N. Moore, James W. Pichert, Gerald B. Hickson, Charles Federspiel, Jennifer U. Blackford May 2006

Rethinking Peer Review: Detecting And Addressing Medical Malpractice Claims Risk, Ilene N. Moore, James W. Pichert, Gerald B. Hickson, Charles Federspiel, Jennifer U. Blackford

Vanderbilt Law Review

A medical center department chair has just been notified that a physician in his department, "Dr. G," is being sued for the fifth time in seven years. The CEO of co-defendant hospital wants the chair to solve Dr. G's "claims problems." At the chair's request, the hospital peer review committee evaluates Dr. G's malpractice cases. While committee members note some minor concerns in the cases, they conclude that in each circumstance he has met the standard of care. They cannot identify any specific technical or educational need, nor can they supply justification for a disciplinary action. The chair is in …


Bridging The Relational-Regulatory Gap: A Pragmatic Information Policy For Patient Safety And Medical Malpractice, William M. Sage, Joshua G. Zivin, Nathaniel B. Chase May 2006

Bridging The Relational-Regulatory Gap: A Pragmatic Information Policy For Patient Safety And Medical Malpractice, William M. Sage, Joshua G. Zivin, Nathaniel B. Chase

Vanderbilt Law Review

The medical malpractice crisis of the last few years has tapped a lot of scholarly energy. Time not spent on original research-adding to the store of knowledge about the medical malpractice system-is often spent communicating with policymakers and the public. These experiences have led us to think a lot about the amount and quality of information circulating within or concerning the medical malpractice system, and about public policy reforms that would improve information flow in the future.

No grand theory has emerged from this meditation. Instead, we have formed definite, though not immutable, opinions about a desirable information policy for …


Bridging The Relational-Regulatory Gap: A Pragmatic Information Policy For Patient Safety And Medical Malpractice, William M. Sage, Joshua Graff Zivin, Nathaniel B. Chase May 2006

Bridging The Relational-Regulatory Gap: A Pragmatic Information Policy For Patient Safety And Medical Malpractice, William M. Sage, Joshua Graff Zivin, Nathaniel B. Chase

Faculty Scholarship

The Article distinguishes and explores three categories of information use: Helping patients understand and participate in their care; Improving patient safety, including analyzing medical errors and identifying unsafe health care providers and practices; and Assessing the performance of the medical liability system in its many dimensions including deterrence, compensation, justice, administrative efficiency, and stability.

For each category, the Article comments on existing laws or programs for information reporting or disclosure, points out major tensions or ambiguities, and suggests pragmatic improvements.


An Extreme Response Or A Necessary Reform - Revealing How Caps On Noneconomic Damages Actually Affect Medical Malpractice Victims And Malpractice Insurance Rates, Kelly Kotur Apr 2006

An Extreme Response Or A Necessary Reform - Revealing How Caps On Noneconomic Damages Actually Affect Medical Malpractice Victims And Malpractice Insurance Rates, Kelly Kotur

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.