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2006

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Articles 1 - 30 of 34

Full-Text Articles in Law

Herbert Hart Elucidated, A. W. Brian Simpson May 2006

Herbert Hart Elucidated, A. W. Brian Simpson

Michigan Law Review

There are a number of good biographies of judges, but very few of individual legal academics; indeed, so far as American legal academics are concerned, the only one of note that comes to mind is William Twining's life of Karl Llewellyn. Llewellyn was, of course, a major figure in the evolution of American law, and his unusual life was a further advantage for his biographer. In this biography, Nicola Lace has taken as her subject an English academic who also had an unusual career, one whose contribution was principally not to the evolution of the English legal system but ...


Science, Humanity, And Atrocity: A Lawyerly Examination, Steven D. Smith May 2006

Science, Humanity, And Atrocity: A Lawyerly Examination, Steven D. Smith

Michigan Law Review

Joseph Vining's reflection on (as the subtitle indicates) the claims of science and humanity begins with a terse but disturbing recitation of these and similar scientific experiments conducted on human beings during the twentieth century in Manchuria, Nazi Germany, and Pol Pot's Cambodia. The incidents are conveyed through quotations, sometimes of the coldly clinical prose that the researchers themselves chose as most suitable for their purposes. These quotations are juxtaposed against others from an array of distinguished scientists and philosophers explaining the naturalistic cosmology that, in the view of these thinkers, modern science has given us: it is ...


What Nobody Knows, John C. P. Goldberg May 2006

What Nobody Knows, John C. P. Goldberg

Michigan Law Review

By meditating on displays of cunning in literature, history, and current events, Don Herzog in his new book isolates and probes difficult puzzles concerning how to understand and evaluate human conduct. The point of the exercise is not to offer a system or framework for resolving these puzzles. Quite the opposite, Cunning aims to discomfit its academic audience in two ways. First, it sets out to show that some of the central dichotomies of modem thought-those between means and ends, reason and desire, self-interest and morality, fact and value, virtue and vice, knowledge and politics, authenticity and artifice, and appearance ...


Tom Morawetz’S “Robust Enterprise”: Jurisprudence After Wittgenstein, Thomas D. Eisele Apr 2006

Tom Morawetz’S “Robust Enterprise”: Jurisprudence After Wittgenstein, Thomas D. Eisele

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

Book review of "Robust Enterprise" by Tom Morawetz.


The Gathering Twilight? Information Privacy On The Internet In The Post-Enlightenment Era, Mark F. Kightlinger Apr 2006

The Gathering Twilight? Information Privacy On The Internet In The Post-Enlightenment Era, Mark F. Kightlinger

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

The steady stream of news reports about violations of privacy on the Internet has spawned a growing body of literature discussing the legal protections available for personally identifiable information—i.e., information about identified or identifiable persons—collected via the Internet. This Article takes the discussion of Internet privacy protection in a new and very different direction by reexamining the U.S. Internet privacy regime from the perspective of a broader cultural/historical analysis and critique. The perspective adopted is that of Alasdair MacIntyre's account of the disarray in Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment discourse about morality and human nature and ...


Should Coercive Interrogation Be Legal?, Eric A. Posner, Adrian Vermeule Feb 2006

Should Coercive Interrogation Be Legal?, Eric A. Posner, Adrian Vermeule

Michigan Law Review

Most academics who have written on coercive interrogation believe that its use is justified in extreme or catastrophic scenarios but that nonetheless it should be illegal. They argue that formal illegality will not prevent justified use of coercive interrogation because government agents will be willing to risk criminal liability and are likely to be pardoned, acquitted, or otherwise forgiven if their behavior is morally justified. This outlaw and forgive approach to coercive interrogation is supposed to prevent coercive interrogation from being applied in inappropriate settings, to be symbolically important, and nonetheless to permit justified coercive interrogation. We argue that the ...


Re-Embodying Law, Steven L. Winter Jan 2006

Re-Embodying Law, Steven L. Winter

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


A Psychology Of Emotional Legal Decision Making: Revulsion And Saving Face In Legal Theory And Practice, Peter H. Huang, Christopher J. Anderson Jan 2006

A Psychology Of Emotional Legal Decision Making: Revulsion And Saving Face In Legal Theory And Practice, Peter H. Huang, Christopher J. Anderson

Articles

Professor Martha C. Nussbaum is an accomplished scholar in an impressive variety of fields. Drawing on her diverse academic backgrounds, Nussbaum has written extensively about emotions and their importance for law from the perspective of her primary specialty, philosophy. Her book Hiding from Humanity criticizes the roles that two particular emotions, disgust and shame, play in the law. Its central thesis is that, as legal actors, we should be wary of disgust and shame because indulging in those emotions allows us to hide from our humanity - both our humanity in the general sense and also those specific features of our ...


Three Versions Of Nonsense, Paul Campos Jan 2006

Three Versions Of Nonsense, Paul Campos

Articles

No abstract provided.


Cognitive Dissonance Revisited: Roper V. Simmons And The Issue Of Adolescent Decision-Making Competence, 52 Wayne L. Rev. 1 (2006), Donald L. Beschle Jan 2006

Cognitive Dissonance Revisited: Roper V. Simmons And The Issue Of Adolescent Decision-Making Competence, 52 Wayne L. Rev. 1 (2006), Donald L. Beschle

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Meta-Blackmail And The Evidentiary Theory: Still Taking Motives Seriously, Mitchell N. Berman Jan 2006

Meta-Blackmail And The Evidentiary Theory: Still Taking Motives Seriously, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Principles Of Fairness For International Economic Treaties: Constructivism And Contractualism, John Linarelli Jan 2006

Principles Of Fairness For International Economic Treaties: Constructivism And Contractualism, John Linarelli

Scholarly Works

No legal system deserving of continued support can exist without an adequate theory of justice. A world trade constitution cannot credibly exist without a clear notion of justice upon which to base a consensus. This paper examines two accounts of fairness found in moral philosophy, those of John Rawls and Tim Scanlon. The Rawlsian theory of justice is well-known to legal scholars. Scanlon's contractualist account may be less well-known. The aim of the paper is to start the discussion as to how fairness theories can be used to develop the tools for examining international economic policies and institutions. After ...


Legal Pluralism And Human Agency, Jeremy Webber Jan 2006

Legal Pluralism And Human Agency, Jeremy Webber

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

Much legal-pluralist scholarship tends to naturalize "the law of the context," treating that law as though it were inherent in social interaction, emerging spontaneously, without conscious human decision. This view overstates the role of agreement in human societies and mischaracterizes the nature of law, including non-state law. All law is concerned with establishing a collective set of norms against a backdrop of normative disagreement, not agreement. It necessarily contains mechanisms for bringing contention to a provisional close, imposing a collective solution. This article presents a theory of legal pluralism that takes human disagreement seriously. The theory retains four themes crucial ...


Pluralism, Disagreement, And Globalization: A Comment On Webber's "Legal Pluralism And Human Agency", David Schneiderman Jan 2006

Pluralism, Disagreement, And Globalization: A Comment On Webber's "Legal Pluralism And Human Agency", David Schneiderman

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Liberalism And Republicanism: In Federal Indian Law, Bethany Berger Jan 2006

Liberalism And Republicanism: In Federal Indian Law, Bethany Berger

Faculty Articles and Papers

This essay shows the ways that, despite apparent contradictions, tribal claims fit within the liberal and republican strands of American democratic theory. Critics of tribal sovereignty and, I believe, the modern Supreme Court, are influenced by the seeming conflict between tribal interests and a liberal philosophical framework. I argue that properly understood, most tribal claims do fit within classical liberal theory, with its emphasis on equality and freedom. It is true that some tribal claims are distinctly those of groups or peoples, and so cannot be adequately captured by an individualist liberal framework. Drawing on the later work of John ...


Legal Positivism: Still Descriptive And Morally Neutral, Andrei Marmor Jan 2006

Legal Positivism: Still Descriptive And Morally Neutral, Andrei Marmor

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

It has become increasingly popular to argue that legal positivism is actually a normative theory, and that it cannot be purely descriptive and morally neutral as H.L.A. Hart has suggested. This article purports to disprove this line of thought. It argues that legal positivism is best understood as a descriptive, morally neutral, theory about the nature of law. The article distinguishes between five possible views about the relations between normative claims and legal positivism, arguing that some of them are not at odds with Hart’s thesis about the nature of jurisprudence, while the others are wrong, both ...


The Rhetoric Of Innovation, Matthew Herder Jan 2006

The Rhetoric Of Innovation, Matthew Herder

LLM Theses

Innovation has been lauded over centuries but the emergence of an "innovation policy paradigm" is a new phenomenon, producing profound changes in the realm of scientific research. Whether these changes stand to benefit 'all' Canadians remains to be seen. Therein lies a problem: The present "innovation policy paradigm" trades on society's deeply entrenched view of innovation (however it occurs) as a public good, while simultaneously encoding for specific a 'brand' of innovation that privileges capital over all other interests. This thesis (1) demonstrates that this paradigm is the product of historically complex contests of power; (2) argues that the ...


On Justitia, Race, Gender, And Blindness, I. Bennett Capers Jan 2006

On Justitia, Race, Gender, And Blindness, I. Bennett Capers

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

This Essay focuses on Justitia's more problematic attributes. Like Justitia's blindfold, which has been described as "the most enigmatic" of her traits. Is the blindfold merely emblematic of Justitia's purported impartiality, her claim to algorithmic justice? As law professor Costas Douzinas and art historian Lynda Nead have asked, does the blindfold enable Justitia "to avoid the temptation to see the face that comes to the law and put the unique characteristics of the concrete person before the abstract logic of the institution"? Or does the blindfold signify something more, a second sight of sorts? Maybe that Justitia ...


Peril Invites Rescue: An Evolutionary Perspective, Bailey Kuklin Jan 2006

Peril Invites Rescue: An Evolutionary Perspective, Bailey Kuklin

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Limits Of Courage And Principle, Jedediah Purdy Jan 2006

The Limits Of Courage And Principle, Jedediah Purdy

Michigan Law Review

Michael Ignatieff, the director of the Carr Center for Human Rights at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, is not a lawyer. His work, however, treats issues of core concern to lawyers: nation-building, human rights, the ethics of warfare, and now, in his latest book, the proper relationship between liberty and security. The Lesser Evil is, in part, a book a legal scholar might have written: a normative framework for lawmaking in the face of the terror threat. It is also something more unusual: an exercise in an older type of jurisprudence. Ignatieff discusses law in the light of moral ...


Probability Misestimates In Medical Care, Bailey Kuklin Jan 2006

Probability Misestimates In Medical Care, Bailey Kuklin

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Aspirational Rights And The Two-Output Thesis, Mitchell N. Berman Jan 2006

Aspirational Rights And The Two-Output Thesis, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


What's Real For Law?, Jospeh Vining Jan 2006

What's Real For Law?, Jospeh Vining

Articles

Law is not academic. The univeristy if not its home. Law is in the wider world and is pervasive there, in language, thought, and action.


The Morality Of Evolutionarily Self-Interested Rescues, Bailey Kuklin Jan 2006

The Morality Of Evolutionarily Self-Interested Rescues, Bailey Kuklin

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Dostoyevsky And The Therapeutic Jurisprudence Confession, 40 J. Marshall L. Rev. 41 (2006), Amy D. Ronner Jan 2006

Dostoyevsky And The Therapeutic Jurisprudence Confession, 40 J. Marshall L. Rev. 41 (2006), Amy D. Ronner

UIC John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reconceptualizing The Boundaries Of "Humanitarian" Assistance: "What's In A Name" Or "The Importance Of Being 'Earnest'"?, 40 J. Marshall L. Rev. 195 (2006), Surabhi Ranganathan Jan 2006

Reconceptualizing The Boundaries Of "Humanitarian" Assistance: "What's In A Name" Or "The Importance Of Being 'Earnest'"?, 40 J. Marshall L. Rev. 195 (2006), Surabhi Ranganathan

UIC John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Problem Of Authority: Revisiting The Service Conception, Joseph Raz Jan 2006

The Problem Of Authority: Revisiting The Service Conception, Joseph Raz

Faculty Scholarship

The problem I have in mind is the problem of the possible justification of subjecting one's will to that of another, and of the normative standing of demands to do so. The account of authority that I offered, many years ago, under the title of the service conception of authority, addressed this issue, and assumed that all other problems regarding authority are subsumed under it. Many found the account implausible. It is thin, relying on very few ideas. It may well appear to be too thin, and to depart too far from many of the ideas that have gained ...


Race, Religion And Law: The Tension Between Spirit And Its Institutionalization, George H. Taylor Jan 2006

Race, Religion And Law: The Tension Between Spirit And Its Institutionalization, George H. Taylor

Articles

My reflections flow from some recent writings by the critical race scholar Derrick Bell. Bell acknowledges that in prior work he has focused on the "the economic, political, and cultural dimensions of racism" but now suggests the possibility of a "deeper foundation" arising from the conjunction that "[m]ost racists are also Christians." This statement is Bell at his best: at once both extremely provocative and extremely unsettling. I want to explore and develop two aspects of Bell's argument.

First, if we want to examine and understand the many dimensions of racism, it is not enough to employ economic ...


What Do We Owe Each Other In The Global Economic Order?: Constructivist And Contractualist Accounts, John Linarelli Jan 2006

What Do We Owe Each Other In The Global Economic Order?: Constructivist And Contractualist Accounts, John Linarelli

Scholarly Works

No legal system deserving of continued support can exist without an adequate theory of justice. A world trade constitution cannot credibly exist without a clear notion of justice upon which to base a consensus. This paper examines two accounts of fairness found in moral philosophy, those of John Rawls and Tim Scanlon. The Rawlsian theory of justice is well-known to legal scholars. Scanlon's contractualist account may be less well-known. The aim of the paper is to start the discussion as to how fairness theories can be used to develop the tools for examining international economic policies and institutions. After ...


Metaphor, Objects, And Commodities, George H. Taylor, Michael J. Madison Jan 2006

Metaphor, Objects, And Commodities, George H. Taylor, Michael J. Madison

Articles

This Article is a contribution to a Symposium that focuses on the ideas of Margaret Jane Radin as a point of departure, and particularly on her analyses of propertization and commodification. While Radin focuses on the harms associated with commodification of the person, relying on Hegel's idea of alienation, we argue that objectification, and in particular objectification of various features of the digital environment, may have important system benefits. We present an extended critique of Radin's analysis, basing the critique in part on Gadamer's argument that meaning and application are interrelated and that meaning changes with application ...