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Full-Text Articles in Law

State Legislative Update, Melissa Blair, Michael Benton, Jessica Gunder, David Lefevre Jul 2006

State Legislative Update, Melissa Blair, Michael Benton, Jessica Gunder, David Lefevre

Journal of Dispute Resolution

As of December 1, 2006, twenty-eight states have enacted some type of right to cure legislation. On April, 28, 2006, Georgia, one of the twenty-eight, amended its construction defect dispute resolution procedures to clarify the responsibilities of the parties. Pennsylvania attempted to become the twenty-ninth, the bill having passed both houses of the legislature, but the Governor vetoed the bill on March 17. Right to cure legislation was considered in South Dakota, but it was deferred to the 36th Legislative Day on February 8, 2006.


Los Principios Generales Del Derecho Probatorio Y El Proceso Civil, Dr Leonardo J. Raznovich Jan 2006

Los Principios Generales Del Derecho Probatorio Y El Proceso Civil, Dr Leonardo J. Raznovich

Dr Leonardo J Raznovich

This article, written and published for a Spanish speaking audience, provides with a critical comparative overview of the principles of civil procedure and of the law of evidence.


Introduction To Vanishing Trial Symposium, John Lande Jan 2006

Introduction To Vanishing Trial Symposium, John Lande

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This symposium in the Journal of Dispute Resolution takes the next step. It includes some analysis of trial court phenomena in the U.S. and expands the focus with greater emphasis on (1) investigation of trial trends outside U.S. courts, (2) explanations of the causes of changing trial patterns, (3) speculations about possible effects of changing litigation patterns, and (4) recommendations to improve the operation of the legal system.


World Without Trials, A, Marc Galanter Jan 2006

World Without Trials, A, Marc Galanter

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Imagine some friendly visitors to America-from Europe or Asia or even from Mars-who are seeking to comprehend the American legal system. Our Martian visitors would have seen A Civil Action and The Runaway Jury at the Red Canal multiplex and surely they have seen syndicated episodes of the ubiquitous Law and Order. Upon arrival they turn on the TV news in their hotel room and scan the newspaper slipped under the door and find both saturated with accounts of square-jawed wife murderers, egomaniacal corporate executives, and freakish entertainers on trial. Unsurprisingly, our visitors readily conclude that the trial is the …


What We Know And What We Should Know About American Trial Trends, Margo Schlanger Jan 2006

What We Know And What We Should Know About American Trial Trends, Margo Schlanger

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This brief essay first summarizes some of that knowledge-in particular, the chief features we know about the shrinking civil trial docket in federal district courts. Next, it proposes four areas of future investigation necessary to understand the contours of the trend and to assess its causes. Then, I bring together the causal hypotheses that have already been proposed, none of which has yet been securely tested. Finally, in an appended bibliography, I list data sources, reports, and scholarly analyses that will be useful to those doing future work.


Designer Trials, Elizabeth Thornburg Jan 2006

Designer Trials, Elizabeth Thornburg

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This article is a thought experiment, or maybe a nightmare, about the intersection of freedom of contract and the trials that have not vanished. Could contracting parties effectively agree in advance of a dispute that any litigation of the case will comply with certain rules? Would such an agreement be enforced even in a contract of adhesion? If so, parties with sufficient bargaining leverage could design away many of the characteristics of litigation that they find unappealing without the need to resort to private processes. The result: a designer trial with the procedural deck stacked in favor of the party …


Designer Trials, Elizabeth G. Thornburg Jan 2006

Designer Trials, Elizabeth G. Thornburg

Faculty Journal Articles and Book Chapters

This article considers the intersection of freedom of contract and the trials that have not vanished. Could contracting parties effectively agree in advance of a dispute that any litigation of the case will comply with certain rules? Would such an agreement be enforced even in a contract of adhesion? If so, parties with sufficient bargaining leverage could design away many of the characteristics of litigation that they find unappealing, without the need to resort to private processes. The result: a designer trial with the procedural deck stacked in favor of the party with the greatest pre-dispute bargaining power.

Such a …


The Effect Of Forum Selection Clauses On District Courts’ Authority To Compel Arbitration, Thomas V. Burch, John W. Hinchey Jan 2006

The Effect Of Forum Selection Clauses On District Courts’ Authority To Compel Arbitration, Thomas V. Burch, John W. Hinchey

Scholarly Works

This is a short piece written for the AAA's Dispute Resolution Journal on two competing provisions in Section 4 of the FAA. One provision tells district courts to compel arbitration in accordance with the parties' agreement, including any forum selection clause. The other says that the court can compel arbitration only within its own territory. This, of course, creates a problem when the forum selection clause calls for arbitration in another jurisdiction. This short article addresses the conflict, showing how courts tend to rule on the issue (as of 2006).


Introduction To Vanishing Trial Symposium, John M. Lande Jan 2006

Introduction To Vanishing Trial Symposium, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

This symposium shows that "vanishing trial" phenomena touch an extremely broad range of issues including transformations of society, courts, dispute resolution procedures, and even the nature of knowledge. These phenomena relate to decisions by litigants in particular cases, court systems, national policy, and international relations. This subject is too large and complex for any symposium to analyze fully, especially at this early stage of analysis. This symposium makes an important contribution to this study, with theories and evidence about the existence, nature, and extent of reductions in trials and similar proceedings. It elaborates a range of theories about possible causes …


Enforcement Of Arbitral Awards Against Foreign States Or State Agencies, S. I. Strong Jan 2006

Enforcement Of Arbitral Awards Against Foreign States Or State Agencies, S. I. Strong

Faculty Publications

Britain's Lord Denning once said that “as a moth is drawn to the light, so is a litigant drawn to the United States.” Certainly, as a pro-arbitration state and a signatory to various international conventions concerning the enforcement of foreign arbitral awards, the United States seems a natural place to bring an action to enforce an arbitral award against a foreign state or state agency. However, suing a sovereign has not traditionally been a simple task in the United States or elsewhere. Most nations grant foreign states the presumption of immunity, thus denying that their domestic courts have jurisdiction to …