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2005

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Book Review: Legal Writing Advice: Questions And Answers, Lisa Mazzie Hatlen Dec 2005

Book Review: Legal Writing Advice: Questions And Answers, Lisa Mazzie Hatlen

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Should Antitrust Education Be Mandatory (For Law School Administrators)?, Royce De R. Barondes, Thomas A. Lambert Oct 2005

Should Antitrust Education Be Mandatory (For Law School Administrators)?, Royce De R. Barondes, Thomas A. Lambert

Faculty Publications

The Executive Committee of the Association of American Law Schools has adopted a Statement of Good Practices that purports to limit the times when law schools may make offers to hire faculty members at other schools. Schools are generally not to make offers for indefinite appointments to professors on other faculties after March 1, subject to extension for two months with the consent of the incumbent's dean. They also are not to make offers contemplating resignation from a current faculty position more than two weeks following those deadlines. Proceeding on the assumption that the AALS policy, whose express terms are …


Mr. Madison Meets A Time Machine: The Political Science Of Federal Sentencing Reform, Frank O. Bowman Iii Oct 2005

Mr. Madison Meets A Time Machine: The Political Science Of Federal Sentencing Reform, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

This is the third in a series of articles analyzing the current turmoil in federal criminal sentencing and offering suggestions for improvements in the federal sentencing system. The first article, "The Failure of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines: A Structural Analysis," 105 COLUMBIA L. REV. 1315 (2005), analyzed the structural failures of the complex federal sentencing guidelines system, particularly those arising from imbalances among the primary institutional sentencing actors - Congress, the judiciary, the Justice Department, and the U.S. Sentencing Commission. The second, "Beyond BandAids: A Proposal for Reconfiguring Federal Sentencing After Booker," 2005 U. OF CHICAGO LEGAL FORUM 149 (2005), …


The Aba/Aals Sabbatical Site Inspection: Strangers In A Strange Land, R. Lawrence Dessem Oct 2005

The Aba/Aals Sabbatical Site Inspection: Strangers In A Strange Land, R. Lawrence Dessem

Faculty Publications

At some point in their deanships, most law school deans will host a sabbatical site inspection of their law school by the American Bar Association (ABA) and the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). Virtually all deans also will have the opportunity to serve as a representative of the ABA or AALS on a team inspecting another law school. In this article I will discuss these site visits from the dean's perspective.


Foreword--Reflections On Judging: A Discussion Following The Release Of The Blackmun Papers , Martha Dragich, Christina E. Wells Oct 2005

Foreword--Reflections On Judging: A Discussion Following The Release Of The Blackmun Papers , Martha Dragich, Christina E. Wells

Faculty Publications

Justice Blackmun's papers were opened to the public on March 4, 2004, the fifth anniversary of his death. Held in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, the collection includes over half a million items, many handwritten by Justice Blackmun. Anyone can read them. For legal scholars, this kind of research can only be described as exhilarating and many of the articles in this symposium draw on research from Justice Blackmun's papers. For the public, the release comes at a time when the interest in judges is particularly acute.


Some Reflections On The Symposium: Judging, The Classical Legal Paradigm And The Possible Contributions Of Science, Christina E. Wells Oct 2005

Some Reflections On The Symposium: Judging, The Classical Legal Paradigm And The Possible Contributions Of Science, Christina E. Wells

Faculty Publications

One theme running through the many excellent contributions to this symposium involves the myriad influences on judicial decision-making. As Professor Wrightsman notes, Supreme Court Justices' personal characteristics may affect their ability to influence colleagues and, consequently, the outcome of Supreme Court decisions. Professor Ruger observes that judges have both attitudinal and jurisprudential preferences that may change over time, affecting legal outcomes differently as time passes. Professor Sisk similarly notes that judges' personal values and experiences influence their decision-making. These observations are consistent with those of numerous other scholars, who find wide-ranging and diverse influences on the judicial resolution of legal …


The Rehnquist Court: Nineteen Years Of Tax Decisions, F. Ladson Boyle Oct 2005

The Rehnquist Court: Nineteen Years Of Tax Decisions, F. Ladson Boyle

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Foreword - Reflections On Judging: A Discussion Following The Release Of The Blackmun Papers , Christina E. Wells, Martha Dragich Oct 2005

Foreword - Reflections On Judging: A Discussion Following The Release Of The Blackmun Papers , Christina E. Wells, Martha Dragich

Faculty Publications

Justice Blackmun's papers were opened to the public on March 4, 2004, the fifth anniversary of his death. Held in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, the collection includes over half a million items, many handwritten by Justice Blackmun. Anyone can read them. For legal scholars, this kind of research can only be described as exhilarating and many of the articles in this symposium draw on research from Justice Blackmun's papers. For the public, the release comes at a time when the interest in judges is particularly acute.


Justice Blackmun And The Spirit Of Liberty, Richard C. Reuben Oct 2005

Justice Blackmun And The Spirit Of Liberty, Richard C. Reuben

Faculty Publications

As we see in this symposium, Justice Harry Blackmun is as controversial in death as he was in life. We live in a time of increasing absolutism, where things are either black or white, red or blue, you are either for me or against me, my way or the highway. It is when we are swayed by the sirens of absolutism that we are most likely to make mistakes, for absolutism diminishes our capacity to see nuance, much less to appreciate and account for it in our reasoning. This is a dangerous thing in a court, and in a democracy. …


Forty Years After Title Vii: Creating An Atmosphere Conducive To Diversity In The Corporate Boardroom, Donald J. Polden Oct 2005

Forty Years After Title Vii: Creating An Atmosphere Conducive To Diversity In The Corporate Boardroom, Donald J. Polden

Faculty Publications

This article analyzes affirmative action in employment: one of the most controversial government policies of the last decade, and one that continues to divide the passions and sensibilities of Americans. This article also addresses the effects of Title VII on employment opportunities for women. In particular, the article considers how successful the fundamental policies of Title VII have been in increasing diversity on corporate boards of directors, and investigates whether increased diversity will improve the performance of publicly traded companies.


Revelations From The Blackmun Papers On The Development Of Death Penalty Law , Martha Dragich Oct 2005

Revelations From The Blackmun Papers On The Development Of Death Penalty Law , Martha Dragich

Faculty Publications

Professor Dragich uses the Blackmun papers to augment our understanding of Justice Blackmun's "evolution" on the question of capital punishment. Though the evolution was gradual, she finds that the case of Warren McCleskey seems to have deeply affected Justice Blackmun.


Politically Motivated Bar Discipline, James E. Moliterno Oct 2005

Politically Motivated Bar Discipline, James E. Moliterno

Faculty Publications

Bar discipline and admission denial have a century~long history of misuse in times of national crisis and upheaval. The terror war is such a time, and the threat of bar discipline has once again become an overreaction to justifiable fear and turmoil. Political misuse of bar machinery is characterized by its setting in the midst of turmoil, by its target, and by its lack of merit. The current instance of politically motivated bar discipline bears the marks of its historical antecedents.


Exclusive Dealing, The Theory Of The Firm, And Raising Rivals' Costs: Toward A New Synthesis, Alan J. Meese Oct 2005

Exclusive Dealing, The Theory Of The Firm, And Raising Rivals' Costs: Toward A New Synthesis, Alan J. Meese

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Advancing Public Interest Practitioner Research Skills In Legal Education, Randy J. Diamond Oct 2005

Advancing Public Interest Practitioner Research Skills In Legal Education, Randy J. Diamond

Faculty Publications

The information revolution has dramatically altered the legal research landscape, expanding the bounds of legal authority. Practitioner research requires more than traditional legal research. It also encompasses factual investigation, non-legal information, interdisciplinary and audience research. Many new lawyers are ill-prepared to research novel and unusual situations, to cope with unwritten laws and local customs, and to meet shifting authority expectations.


The Promise And Perils Of Collaborative Law, John M. Lande Oct 2005

The Promise And Perils Of Collaborative Law, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

Getting people to use an interest-based approach in negotiation has been a difficult problem. Experts provide helpful suggestions for changing the game, though these are usually limited to case-by-case efforts within a culture of adversarial negotiation. Collaborative law (CL) is an important innovation that establishes a general norm of interest-based negotiation and intentionally develops a new legal culture. This article describes CL's promise and potential perils, focusing particularly on the perils to complement the literature touting the promise.


Collaborative Governance In The Restructured Electricity Industry, Charles H. Koch Jr. Jul 2005

Collaborative Governance In The Restructured Electricity Industry, Charles H. Koch Jr.

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Judicial Selection By The Numbers, Michael J. Gerhardt Jul 2005

Judicial Selection By The Numbers, Michael J. Gerhardt

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Testimonial And The Formalistic Definition -- The Case For An "Accusatorial" Fix, Robert P. Mosteller Jul 2005

Testimonial And The Formalistic Definition -- The Case For An "Accusatorial" Fix, Robert P. Mosteller

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The 'Abuse Excuse' In Capital Sentencing Trials: Is It Relevant To Responsibility, Punishment, Or Neither?, Paul J. Litton Jul 2005

The 'Abuse Excuse' In Capital Sentencing Trials: Is It Relevant To Responsibility, Punishment, Or Neither?, Paul J. Litton

Faculty Publications

The violent criminal who was a victim of severe childhood abuse frequently appears in the responsibility literature because he presents a difficulty for theorists who maintain the compatibility of causal determinism and our practices of holding persons responsible. The challenge is based on the fact that learning about an offender's horrific childhood mitigates the indignation that many persons feel towards him, possibly indicating that they hold him less than fully responsible. Many capital defendants present evidence of suffering childhood abuse, and many jurors find this evidence to count against imposing death. The most obvious explanation for a response like this …


The Constitutional Limits To Court-Stripping, Michael J. Gerhardt Jul 2005

The Constitutional Limits To Court-Stripping, Michael J. Gerhardt

Faculty Publications

This Article is part of a colloquy between Professor Michael J. Gerhardt and Professor Martin Redish about the constitutionality of court-stripping measures. Court-stripping measures are laws restricting federal court jurisdiction over particular subject matters. In particular, the authors discuss the constitutionality of the Marriage Protection Act of 2004. Professor Gerhardt argues that the Act is unconstitutional and threatens to destroy the principles of separation of powers, federalism and due process. It prevents Supreme Court review of Congressional action and hinders the uniformity and finality of constitutional law. Furthermore, the Act violates the equal protection component of the Fifth Amendment Due …


International Courts And Tribunals, Nancy Amoury Combs, Carl Magnus Nesser, Ucheora O. Onwuamaegbu, Mark B. Rees, Jacqueline Weisman Jul 2005

International Courts And Tribunals, Nancy Amoury Combs, Carl Magnus Nesser, Ucheora O. Onwuamaegbu, Mark B. Rees, Jacqueline Weisman

Faculty Publications

This article reviews and summarizes significant developments in 2004 concerning international courts and tribunals, particularly events relating to tbe International Court of Justice, tbe United Nations Compensation Commission, the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal, and tbe Claims Resolution Tribunal. Significant developments relating to the International Criminal Court, the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda, proposed additional ad hoc international criminal tribunals, the International Tribunal for the Law of tbe Sea, and tbe World Trade Organization dispute settlement system and other trade dispute settlement systems are detailed in other articles in this issue.


Fourth Amendment Federalism? The Court's Vacillating Mistrust And Trust Of State Search And Seizure Laws, Kathryn R. Urbonya Jul 2005

Fourth Amendment Federalism? The Court's Vacillating Mistrust And Trust Of State Search And Seizure Laws, Kathryn R. Urbonya

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Giftedness, Disadvantage, And Law, Cynthia V. Ward Jul 2005

Giftedness, Disadvantage, And Law, Cynthia V. Ward

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Official Indiscretions: Considering Sex Bargains With Government Informants, Susan S. Kuo Jun 2005

Official Indiscretions: Considering Sex Bargains With Government Informants, Susan S. Kuo

Faculty Publications

This article addresses an alarming new investigatory practice employed by law enforcement officials: requiring arrestees to carry out sexual tasks as confidential informants. Requiring arrestee informants to engage in sexual activities in exchange for a reduction or possible elimination of criminal penalties they might otherwise incur raises constitutional concerns. Informants can and do accept a variety of investigative assignments. But, as this article shows by drawing on sociological research, sex tasks differ fundamentally from more conventional informant undertakings. The importance of this distinction is that while adult individuals undoubtedly can provide consent to sexual matters, the validity of such consent …


Caught In The Trap: Pricing Racial Housing Preferences, A. Mechele Dickerson May 2005

Caught In The Trap: Pricing Racial Housing Preferences, A. Mechele Dickerson

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Reflections On The Teaching Of Constitutional Law, William W. Van Alstyne Apr 2005

Reflections On The Teaching Of Constitutional Law, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Nasd Regulation Of Ipo Conflicts Of Interest - Does Gatekeeping Work?, Royce De R. Barondes Apr 2005

Nasd Regulation Of Ipo Conflicts Of Interest - Does Gatekeeping Work?, Royce De R. Barondes

Faculty Publications

This Article contributes to the debate on the efficacy of third party gatekeeping in regulating the capital markets, by presenting empirical evidence of the efficacy of one kind of gatekeeper, a qualified independent underwriter (QIU). Under NASD rules, when an investment bank participating in a securities offering has one of several enumerated conflicts of interest, the securities cannot be sold at a price higher than that recommended by a QIU. Examining 1,188 IPOs from 1997 through 2000 discloses a negative, statistically significant relationship between IPO initial returns and each of (i) the fact that participating NASD members (or their affiliates) …


Murder, Meth, Mammon & Moral Values: The Political Landscape Of American Sentencing Reform (In Symposium On White Collar Crime), Frank O. Bowman Iii Apr 2005

Murder, Meth, Mammon & Moral Values: The Political Landscape Of American Sentencing Reform (In Symposium On White Collar Crime), Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

This Article examines the ongoing American experiment in mass incarceration and considers the prospects for meaningful sentencing reform.


The Fourteenth Rule, R. Lawrence Dessem Apr 2005

The Fourteenth Rule, R. Lawrence Dessem

Faculty Publications

Thirteen Rules for Taking Law Exams is vintage Phillips perhaps most significantly because of its wit. Rather than writing his essay in a straightforward manner, Professor Phillips satirized the common mistakes that are so prevalent in law school examination answers. Professor Phillips' first rule (“never spell correctly any word which is central to the content of the course”) is, in part, justified because such errors “weaken the teacher's resistance so that he will more readily accept greater errors to come.


Shifting The Focus From The Myth Of "The Vanishing Trial" To Complex Conflict Management Systems, Or I Learned Almost Everything I Need To Know About Conflict Resolution From Marc Galanter, John M. Lande Apr 2005

Shifting The Focus From The Myth Of "The Vanishing Trial" To Complex Conflict Management Systems, Or I Learned Almost Everything I Need To Know About Conflict Resolution From Marc Galanter, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

To say that The Vanishing Trial is a myth is not to suggest that the facts or analysis in Professor Marc Galanter's seminal report on the vanishing trial are fictional or inaccurate. Indeed, he marshals a massive amount of data to show that the number of trials and the trial rates have been declining for the past four decades, particularly in the federal courts. The report documents an apparent paradox: the proportion of cases going to trial has dropped sharply during the past forty years despite substantial increases in many other legal indicators including the number of lawyers, the number …