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Full-Text Articles in Law

Three Cases/Four Tales: Commons, Capture, The Public Trust, And Property In Land, Dale Goble Jan 2004

Three Cases/Four Tales: Commons, Capture, The Public Trust, And Property In Land, Dale Goble

Articles

No abstract provided.


Public Ruses, James E. Krier, Christopher Serkin Jan 2004

Public Ruses, James E. Krier, Christopher Serkin

Articles

The public use requirement of eminent domain law may be working its way back into the United States Constitution. To be sure, the words "public use" appear in the document-and in many state constitutions as well, but the federal provision applies to the states in any event-as one of the Fifth Amendment's limitations on the government's inherent power to take private property against the will of its owners. (The other limitation is that "just compensation" must be paid, of which more later.) Any taking of private property, the text suggests, must be for public use. Those words, however, have amounted …


The Narratives Of Cyberspace Law (Or, Learning From Casablanca), Michael J. Madison Jan 2004

The Narratives Of Cyberspace Law (Or, Learning From Casablanca), Michael J. Madison

Articles

Cyberspace scholars have wrestled extensively with the question of the "right" metaphorical approach to the Internet, in order to guide legal and policy decisions. Literary theorists have wrestled with the perception that cyberspace undermines conventional ideas about narrative. This Essay suggests that each group could learn from the other. Cyberspace tells a better story than literary scholars believe, and the lawyers should pay more attention to the narrative attributes of cyberspace. To illustrate the argument, the Essay proposes a specific story framework for cyberspace: the film Casablanca.


Where Does Creativity Come From? And Other Stories Of Copyright, Michael J. Madison Jan 2004

Where Does Creativity Come From? And Other Stories Of Copyright, Michael J. Madison

Articles

This Commentary on Lydia Pallas Loren, Untangling the Web of Music Copyrights, 53 Case W. Res. L. Rev. 673 (2003), observes that debates over a variety of copyright law issues can be - and in fact, often are - structured in narrative terms, rather than in terms of doctrine, policy, or empirical inquiry. I suggest a series of such narratives, each framed by a theme drawn from a feature film. The Commentary suggests that we should recognize more clearly the role of narrative in intellectual property discourse, and that intellectual property narratives should be examined critically.


The Inevitable Failure Of Nuisance-Based Theories Of The Takings Clause: A Reply To Professor Claeys, Stewart E. Sterk Jan 2004

The Inevitable Failure Of Nuisance-Based Theories Of The Takings Clause: A Reply To Professor Claeys, Stewart E. Sterk

Articles

Rejecting the proposition (advanced by Professor Eric Claeys) that the Rehnquist Court's conservatives have missed an opportunity to transform takings law, this commentary demonstrates that a nuisance-based theory cannot provide a comprehensive basis for takings clause jurisprudence. The commentary further establishes that no plausible vision of originalism supports a nuisance based theory, and concludes by arguing that judicial scrutiny of state and local land use practices is less deferential than it was at the inception of the Rehnquist Court.