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2004

Secured Transactions

Securitization

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

The End Of Notice: Secrets And Liens In Commercial Finance Law, Jonathan C. Lipson Aug 2004

The End Of Notice: Secrets And Liens In Commercial Finance Law, Jonathan C. Lipson

ExpressO

This article explores important recent changes in the way that we treat personal property in commercial finance transactions. Among other things, these changes reduce or eliminate the obligation to give notice of interests in personal property when it is used in commercial finance transactions (as, e.g., collateral for a loan).

A principal purpose of notice-filing has been to deter the creation of secret liens, interests in property that are neither recorded nor otherwise readily observable. Secret liens are universally castigated as abhorrent.

Yet, two recent sets of legislative developments suggest that we may care much less about the problem of …


Secrets And Liens: Verification And Measurement In Commercial Finance Law, Jonathan C. Lipson Apr 2004

Secrets And Liens: Verification And Measurement In Commercial Finance Law, Jonathan C. Lipson

ExpressO

This article argues that commercial finance law increasingly uses contract rules to displace property rules, especially as these rules pertain to verifying and measuring property interests. In this context, verification simply means confirming the existence of a property interest, such as a lien or security interest. Measurement means determining the relationships of various property interests to one another (i.e., the priority of interests).

Historically, commercial finance law – in particular the Uniform Commercial Code, which governs loans secured by personal property – provided that something would be treated as “property” only if its property character was fairly easy to discover. …


Death And Resurrection Of Secured Credit, James J. White Jan 2004

Death And Resurrection Of Secured Credit, James J. White

Articles

The Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978 (the Code) posed palpable threats to secured creditors. It was drafted by a commission that was at least as concerned with the rights of debtors as with the rights of creditors. It was modified and adopted by a Congress that might have been the most liberal since World War II and signed into law by President Carter at the apogee of the left's power, two years before the Reagan election that marked the rise of the right and the beginning of the left's decline. The power of the left was exerted most forcefully on …