Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2003

Law and Society

Discipline
Institution
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 28 of 28

Full-Text Articles in Law

Progressivist Origins Of The 2003 California Gubernatorial Recall, Kira L. Klatchko Dec 2003

Progressivist Origins Of The 2003 California Gubernatorial Recall, Kira L. Klatchko

ExpressO

Progressivist Origins of the 2003 California Gubernatorial Recall, was written in Sacramento in the midst of the first statewide recall of an elected official in California. The paper explores the nature of the recall procedure and its implementation in the state, and is chiefly an inquiry into the relatedness of the current incarnation and its Progressivist root. It focuses particularly on the recall of Governor Gray Davis, and details how shifting attitudes towards public participation have altered the procedure over time.


Booze, Drugs, And Rock & Roll: Crime During The College Years, Paul S. Gutman Oct 2003

Booze, Drugs, And Rock & Roll: Crime During The College Years, Paul S. Gutman

ExpressO

In this Article, the author examines the predilection of college and university students towards certain types of illegal behaviors. Specifically, the Article considers the widespread instances of drug use, under-age alcohol use, and "file-sharing" using Napster and its progeny. The Article's main focus is on why such illegal behaviors are rampant among college students who might otherwise be


All The Lizards Stand And Say “Yes Yes Yes” : The Element Of Play In Legal Actions Against Animals And Inanimate Objects, Anna Pervukhin Oct 2003

All The Lizards Stand And Say “Yes Yes Yes” : The Element Of Play In Legal Actions Against Animals And Inanimate Objects, Anna Pervukhin

ExpressO

Legal actions against non-humans (whether animals or objects) were once widespread. They were viewed seriously and undoubtedly served important social functions. This article considers the possibility that some of these actions may have been playful as well. Certain aspects of legal actions against animals and objects-- occasional moments of levity, a preoccupation with formal rules, and a strong emphasis on imaginative transformation-- suggest that these actions had elements of play. The possibility is worth considering for two reasons. First, it may shed some light on a practice that has perplexed and disturbed commentators for centuries. Second, an examination of play ...


Racism As "The Nation's Crucial Sin": Theology And Derrick Bell , George H. Taylor Oct 2003

Racism As "The Nation's Crucial Sin": Theology And Derrick Bell , George H. Taylor

ExpressO

The Article probes a paradox that lies at the heart of the work of critical race scholar Derrick Bell. Bell claims on the one hand that racism is permanent, and yet on the other he argues that the fight against racism is both necessary and meaningful. Although Bell’s thesis of racism’s permanence has been criticized for rendering action for racial justice unavailing, the Article advances an understanding of Bell that supports and defends the integrity of his paradox. The Article draws upon the work of Protestant theologian Reinhold Niebuhr and Niebuhr’s paradox that social action is both ...


Beyond Words: An Empirical Study Of Context In Contract Creation, Deborah A. Schmedemann Oct 2003

Beyond Words: An Empirical Study Of Context In Contract Creation, Deborah A. Schmedemann

South Carolina Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Philadelphia Story: The Rhetoric Of School Reform, Susan Dejarnatt Sep 2003

The Philadelphia Story: The Rhetoric Of School Reform, Susan Dejarnatt

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Resource Parity For Defense Counsel And The Struggle Between Public Choice And Public Ideals, Ronald F. Wright Sep 2003

Resource Parity For Defense Counsel And The Struggle Between Public Choice And Public Ideals, Ronald F. Wright

ExpressO

The quality of criminal defense counsel desperately needs improving. The strategy this article explores is not a change in the legal standard governing ineffective assistance of counsel claims, or a change in the Supreme Court's reasoning, but something far more fundamental: money. I ask whether it is feasible to link the funding available for defense lawyers to the money that the government spends on prosecution lawyers - in other words, parity of resources.

For reasons described in this article, resource parity will probably not come from the courts, at least not if they act alone. Major funding changes like this ...


Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll Sep 2003

Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll

Working Paper Series

Many participants in the music industry consider unauthorized downloading of music files over the Internet to be “theft” of their “property.” Many Internet users who exchange music files reject that characterization. Prompted by this dispute, this Article explores how those who create and distribute music first came to look upon music as their property and when in Western history the law first supported this view. By analyzing the economic and legal structures governing musicmaking in Western Europe from the classical period in Greece through the Renaissance, the Article shows that the law first granted some exclusive rights in the Middle ...


Interpersonal Dynamics, Joshua D. Rosenberg Sep 2003

Interpersonal Dynamics, Joshua D. Rosenberg

ExpressO

This article explains the importance of relationship skills to attorneys. It explains why, despite the significance of these skills to attorneys, law schools and law firms ignore them. It then explains how these skills can be taught in law school, and how a relation al perspective can become not simply an important part of the law, but also an important part of the lives of lawyers. It develops and supports an ap proach that develops the cognitive, behavioral, perceptual and emotional skills and awareness essential to both accurate communication and productive and meaningful relationships. This approach is quite different from ...


Norms, Rationality, And Communication: A Reputation Theory Of Social Norms, Andreas Engert Sep 2003

Norms, Rationality, And Communication: A Reputation Theory Of Social Norms, Andreas Engert

ExpressO

Does the discovery of "law and social norms" necessitate breaking with the rational choice paradigm? In this paper, I argue for an answer in the negative. To this end, I propose a reputation theory of social norms, which differs from other proposals in two principal respects: First, it explains norms without any assumption of behavioral constraints (like habit or conscience) and normative motivations (like altruism or aspiration to esteem). Second, it does even without any assumption regarding model-exogenous, private information that most other reputation and signaling explanations use (such as the discount rate in Eric Posner's signaling model).

Instead ...


The "No Property" Problem: Understanding Poverty By Understanding Wealth, Jane Baron Sep 2003

The "No Property" Problem: Understanding Poverty By Understanding Wealth, Jane Baron

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Road To Democratic State Without Corruption, Sung-Soo Han Jul 2003

Road To Democratic State Without Corruption, Sung-Soo Han

Sung-Soo Han

It was not until liberation from Japan in 1948 that democracy was first introduced in Korea. For the past 55 years, Korea has developed democracy by trial and error. However, we still have a long way to go before achieving the true democracy. During the past century, Korea experienced 36 years of colonial rule by Japan, Korean War and the foreign currency crisis. In the meantime, she has also achieved the Miracle of Han River on the territory reduced to ashes due to Korean War, which was enough to attract the attention of the world. The Korean government has emphasized ...


Life And Death Decision-Making: Judges V. Legislators As Sources Of Law In Bioethics, Charles H. Baron Jul 2003

Life And Death Decision-Making: Judges V. Legislators As Sources Of Law In Bioethics, Charles H. Baron

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In some situations, courts may be better sources of new law than legislatures. Some support for this proposition is provided by the performance of American courts in the development of law regarding the “right to die.” When confronted with the problems presented by mid-Twentieth Century technological advances in prolonging human life, American legislators were slow to act. It was the state common law courts, beginning with Quinlan in 1976, that took primary responsibility for gradually crafting new legal principles that excepted withdrawal of life-prolonging treatment from the application of general laws dealing with homicide and suicide. These courts, like the ...


Regulation And Rights In Networked Space, Andrew D. Murray Jun 2003

Regulation And Rights In Networked Space, Andrew D. Murray

Professor Andrew D Murray

The Internet is often described as inherently free from regulation; a space where freedoms and liberties are guaranteed by the design of the network environment. The naivety of this view has, however, been exposed by commentators such as Andrew Shapiro, Joel Reidenberg and Lawrence Lessig who have clearly demonstrated the inherent regulability of networked space. The question no longer is: can networked space be regulated? But rather: how and by whom is it regulated? This paper examines the regulation of rights in networked space. In seeking to address this issue, property rights and rights to free speech, or free expression ...


Where Does Creativity Come From? And Other Stories Of Copyright, Michael J. Madison Apr 2003

Where Does Creativity Come From? And Other Stories Of Copyright, Michael J. Madison

Michael J. Madison

This Commentary on Lydia Pallas Loren, Untangling the Web of Music Copyrights, 53 Case W. Res. L. Rev. 673 (2003), observes that debates over a variety of copyright law issues can be - and in fact, often are - structured in narrative terms, rather than in terms of doctrine, policy, or empirical inquiry. I suggest a series of such narratives, each framed by a theme drawn from a feature film. The Commentary suggests that we should recognize more clearly the role of narrative in intellectual property discourse, and that intellectual property narratives should be examined critically.


Introduction: Law And Cultural Conflict (Symposium Editor), Sarah K. Harding Feb 2003

Introduction: Law And Cultural Conflict (Symposium Editor), Sarah K. Harding

Sarah K. Harding

No abstract provided.


Introduction: Law And Cultural Conflict (Symposium Editor), Sarah K. Harding Feb 2003

Introduction: Law And Cultural Conflict (Symposium Editor), Sarah K. Harding

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Consumer-Use Approach To Products Liability, Alan Calnan Jan 2003

A Consumer-Use Approach To Products Liability, Alan Calnan

Alan Calnan

In dicta, courts have had no trouble identifying unreasonable product uses. Indeed, over the years, they have compiled an extensive list of examples. That list includes the following pearls of wisdom. An automobile should not be used as a bulldozer. A shovel should not be used as a doorstop. A hunting and fishing knife should not be used to shave. A knife should not be used as a toothpick. An electric drill should not be used to clean teeth. A power saw should not be used to clip fingernails. A motorized hedge clipper should not be used to trim beards ...


Defining Capacity: The Competing Interests Of Autonomy And Need, Nancy J. Knauer Jan 2003

Defining Capacity: The Competing Interests Of Autonomy And Need, Nancy J. Knauer

Nancy J. Knauer

This Essay addresses the question of capacity - the basic threshold determination that pervades all areas of the law. An individual must have the requisite level of capacity to consent to sex, refuse medical treatment, enter into a contract, marry, divorce, relinquish parental rights, execute a will, make a gift, donate organs, vote, serve on a jury, stand trial, and even to hire a lawyer. The standards regulating determinations of capacity are not monolithic. An individual may lack the capacity to contract, but may have the requisite capacity to write a will or to refuse life-sustaining medical treatment. As individuals, we ...


Science, Identity, And The Construction Of The Gay Political Narrative, Nancy J. Knauer Jan 2003

Science, Identity, And The Construction Of The Gay Political Narrative, Nancy J. Knauer

Nancy J. Knauer

This Article contends that the current debate over gay civil rights is, at base, a dispute over the nature of same-sex desire. Pro-gay forces advocate an ethnic or identity model of homosexuality based on the conviction that sexual orientation is an immutable, unchosen, and benign characteristic. The assertion that, in essence, gays are "born that way," has produced a gay political narrative that rests on claims of shared identity (i.e., homosexuals are a blameless minority) and arguments of equivalence (i.e., as a blameless minority, homosexuals deserve equal treatment and protection against discrimination). The pro-family counter-narrative is based on ...


Parliamentary Oversight Of Wto Rule-Making: The Ploitical And Normative Contest, Gregory C. Shaffer Jan 2003

Parliamentary Oversight Of Wto Rule-Making: The Ploitical And Normative Contest, Gregory C. Shaffer

Gregory C Shaffer

No abstract provided.


More Disagreement Over Human Dignity: The Federal Constitutional Court's Most Recent Benetton Advertising Decision, Craig T. Smith Jan 2003

More Disagreement Over Human Dignity: The Federal Constitutional Court's Most Recent Benetton Advertising Decision, Craig T. Smith

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


No Other Gods: Answering The Call Of Faith In The Practice Of Law, Howard Lesnick Jan 2003

No Other Gods: Answering The Call Of Faith In The Practice Of Law, Howard Lesnick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Dream Of Interpretation, Anthony P. Farley Jan 2003

The Dream Of Interpretation, Anthony P. Farley

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

For any given rule, there are infinite interpretations. Yet law and interpretation are inseparable. Interpretation is a complex process, based on murky forces, exposed to some extent in institutions, habits and conventions, which are often poorly understood even by the person charged with the act of interpreting. The article deconstructs—through a series of improvisations on logic, reason, rules, duty, desire, repetition, enchantment, symptom and sin—the dream of interpreting law. Drawing on Wittgenstein, Freud, Kant, Foucault and others from the pantheon of modernism, the article ruminates on the endless prospect of interpretation and the possibility of discord.


Speaking Volumes: Musings On The Issues Of The Day, Inspired By The Memory Of Mary Joe Frug, Regina Austin, Elizabeth M. Schneider Jan 2003

Speaking Volumes: Musings On The Issues Of The Day, Inspired By The Memory Of Mary Joe Frug, Regina Austin, Elizabeth M. Schneider

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Child Placement Decisions: The Relevance Of Facial Resemblance And Biological Relationships, David J. Herring Jan 2003

Child Placement Decisions: The Relevance Of Facial Resemblance And Biological Relationships, David J. Herring

Articles

This article discusses two studies of evolution and human behavior addressing child-adult relationships and explores implications for policies and practices surrounding placement of children in foster homes. The first study indicates that men favor children whose facial features resemble their own facial features. This study may justify public child welfare decisionmakers in considering facial resemblance as they attempt to place children in safe foster homes.

The second study indicates that parents are likely to invest more in children who are biologically related to them, thus enhancing their long term well-being. Among other implications, this study may justify public child welfare ...


Unexplainable On Grounds Other Than Race: The Inversion Of Privilege And Subordination In Equal Protection Jurisprudence, Darren Hutchinson Dec 2002

Unexplainable On Grounds Other Than Race: The Inversion Of Privilege And Subordination In Equal Protection Jurisprudence, Darren Hutchinson

Darren L Hutchinson

In this article, Professor Darren Hutchinson contributes to the debate over the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause by arguing that the Supreme Court has inverted its purpose and effect. Professor Hutchinson contends that the Court, in its judicial capacity, provides protection and judicial solicitude for privileged and powerful groups in our country, while at the same time requires traditionally subordinated and oppressed groups to utilize the political process to seek redress for acts of oppression. According to Professor Hutchinson, this process allows social structures of oppression and subordination to remain intact.

First, Professor Hutchinson examines the ...


Legislative Terrorism: A Primer For The Non-Islamic State; Secularism And Different Believers, Gwendolyn Yvonne Alexis Dec 2002

Legislative Terrorism: A Primer For The Non-Islamic State; Secularism And Different Believers, Gwendolyn Yvonne Alexis

Gwendolyn Yvonne Alexis

In industrial societies where civil law and state institutions have become well-established secular vehicles for governing the populace, it is widely assumed that the state no longer has an interest in fortifying the religious sector as a complementary source of social control. Thus, a distinction is drawn between the Islamic state that is ruled by religious law and the secular state of Western industrial societies in which religion is deemed to have lost its influence in the public sphere. This dissertation argues that civil law is not religiously neutral and thus challenges a central premise of secularization theory. Introducing a ...