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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

Changing Identities And Changing Laws: Possibilities For A Global Legal Culture, Russell Menyhart Jul 2003

Changing Identities And Changing Laws: Possibilities For A Global Legal Culture, Russell Menyhart

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

No abstract provided.


Cheap Talk Citizenship: The Democratic Implications Of Voting With Dollars, Bruce E. Cain May 2003

Cheap Talk Citizenship: The Democratic Implications Of Voting With Dollars, Bruce E. Cain

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Disease And Cure?, L. A. Powe Jr. May 2003

Disease And Cure?, L. A. Powe Jr.

Michigan Law Review

Sunstein uses Franklin's remark to make two related points. First, citizens bear the burden of maintaining the American republic as a healthy, vibrant place; being a citizen is decidedly different from being a consumer. The former has duties, the latter wants (pp. 113-23). Second, and this is the gist of the slender book, the republic is jeopardized by the possibilities of the Internet. Sunstein assumes the correctness of MIT technology specialist Nicholas Negroponte's conclusion that in the not-too-distant future we will be able to create a "Daily Me" on the Internet that will provide the personalized information (including news) that …


The Child Citizenship Act: Too Little, Too Late For Tuan Nguyen, Ashley Moore Feb 2003

The Child Citizenship Act: Too Little, Too Late For Tuan Nguyen, Ashley Moore

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Proxies For Loyalty In Constitutional Immigration Law: Citizenship And Race After September 11, Victor C. Romero Jan 2003

Proxies For Loyalty In Constitutional Immigration Law: Citizenship And Race After September 11, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

The purpose of this article is to share some thoughts about using citizenship and race as proxies for loyalty in constitutional immigration discourse within two contexts: one historical and one current. The current context is the profiling of Muslim and Arab immigrants post-September 11, and the historical context is the distinction the Constitution draws between birthright and naturalized citizens in the Presidential Eligibility Clause.


The Participation Of States And Citizens In Global Governance, Saskia Sassen Jan 2003

The Participation Of States And Citizens In Global Governance, Saskia Sassen

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

Globalization and Governance: The Prospects for Democracy, Symposium


Tres Vidas, Una Guerra Rafael Iznaga, Bárbara Pérez Y Gregoria Quesada Entre La Emancipación Y La Ciudadanía, Rebecca Scott Jan 2003

Tres Vidas, Una Guerra Rafael Iznaga, Bárbara Pérez Y Gregoria Quesada Entre La Emancipación Y La Ciudadanía, Rebecca Scott

Book Chapters

In this article, Scott takes a microhistorian approach as she looks at the ways in which three Cubans of color (Rafael Iznaga, Bárbara Pérez and Gregoria Quesada), from the same rural neighborhood, sought to define and attain citizenship during and immediately after the Cuban War of Independence from 1895-1898. Juxtaposing oral and written sources, Scott shows how such evidence can be both complementary and contradictory, and how each source should be examined in light of the others.

Rafael Iznaga fought in the war as a soldier of the Liberation Army, and returned with prestige and status. While his life can …


Relational Contract Theory And Democratic Citizenship, James W. Fox Jr. Jan 2003

Relational Contract Theory And Democratic Citizenship, James W. Fox Jr.

Case Western Reserve Law Review

No abstract provided.


Bête Noire: How Race-Based Policing Threatens National Security, Lenese C. Herbert Jan 2003

Bête Noire: How Race-Based Policing Threatens National Security, Lenese C. Herbert

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

This Article asserts that race-based policing, enabled and exacerbated by race-blind judicial review, creates an ire with a purpose that promises, especially after September 11, to make us all less safe. The illegitimate marginalization of American citizens aggravates an already alienated population and primes them for cooperation with those who seek to harm the United States. Race-based policing guts the expectation of fair-dealing, legitimacy, and justice in the criminal justice system, creating marginalized populations, especially of African Americans. Lack of judicial redress in the face of such policing irrevocably stains already beleaguered African Americans (and others so policed) as inferior …