Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2003

Capital punishment

Discipline
Institution
Publication
Publication Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 35

Full-Text Articles in Law

Injustice Casts Shadow On History Of State Executions, John Bessler Dec 2003

Injustice Casts Shadow On History Of State Executions, John Bessler

All Faculty Scholarship

This article, published in the StarTribune of Minneapolis, discusses the history of lynchings and executions in the State of Minnesota. It specifically discusses miscarriages of justice that have taken place in Minnesota, along with highlighting other problems associated with capital punishment.


Executing Juvenile Offenders: A Reexamination Of Stanford V. Kentucky In Light Of Atkins V. Virginia, Bryan Graff Dec 2003

Executing Juvenile Offenders: A Reexamination Of Stanford V. Kentucky In Light Of Atkins V. Virginia, Bryan Graff

Georgia State University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Preface, Brent E. Newton Oct 2003

Preface, Brent E. Newton

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Representing Death-Sentence Appellants, Charles B. Blackmar Oct 2003

Representing Death-Sentence Appellants, Charles B. Blackmar

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Killing The Non-Willing: Atkins, The Volitionally Incapacitated, And The Death Penalty, John H. Blume, Sheri Lynn Johnson Oct 2003

Killing The Non-Willing: Atkins, The Volitionally Incapacitated, And The Death Penalty, John H. Blume, Sheri Lynn Johnson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Jamie Wilson, nineteen years old and severely mentally ill, walked into a school cafeteria and started shooting. Two children died, and Jamie was charged with two counts of capital murder. Because he admitted his guilt, the only issue at his trial was the appropriate punishment. The trial judge assigned to his case, after hearing expert testimony on his mental state, found that mental illness rendered Jamie unable to conform his conduct to the requirements of law at the time of the crime—not impaired by his mental illness in his ability to control his behavior, but unable to control his ...


Review Of The Hanging Of Ephraim Wheeler : A Story Of Rape, Incest, And Justice In Early America, Michael F. Russo May 2003

Review Of The Hanging Of Ephraim Wheeler : A Story Of Rape, Incest, And Justice In Early America, Michael F. Russo

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Virginia's Capital Jurors, Stephen P. Garvey, Paul Marcus Apr 2003

Virginia's Capital Jurors, Stephen P. Garvey, Paul Marcus

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Next to Texas, no state has executed more capital defendants than Virginia. Moreover, the likelihood of a death sentence actually being carried out is greater in Virginia than it is elsewhere, while the length of time between the imposition of a death sentence and its actual execution is shorter. Virginia has thus earned a reputation among members of the defense bar as being among the worst of the death penalty states. Yet insofar as these facts about Virginia's death penalty relate primarily to the behavior of state and federal appellate courts, they suggest that what makes Virginia's death ...


Killing For The State: The Darkest Side Of American Nursing, Dave Holmes, Cary H. Federman Mar 2003

Killing For The State: The Darkest Side Of American Nursing, Dave Holmes, Cary H. Federman

Department of Justice Studies Faculty Scholarship and Creative Works

The aim of this article is to bring to the attention of the international nursing community the discrepancy between a pervasive ‘caring’ nursing discourse and the most unethical nursing practice in the United States. In this article, we present a duality: the conflict in American prisons between nursing ethics and the killing machinery. The US penal system is a setting in which trained healthcare personnel practices the extermination of life. We look upon the sanitization of death work as an application of healthcare professionals’ skills and knowledge and their appropriation by the state to serve its ends. A review of ...


United States V. Quinones 313 F.3d 49 (2d Cir. 2002) United States V. Quinones 317 F.3d 86 (2d Cir. 2002) Mar 2003

United States V. Quinones 313 F.3d 49 (2d Cir. 2002) United States V. Quinones 317 F.3d 86 (2d Cir. 2002)

Capital Defense Journal

No abstract provided.


Va. Code Ann. S 19.2-327.01 Mar 2003

Va. Code Ann. S 19.2-327.01

Capital Defense Journal

No abstract provided.


Va. Code Ann. § 9.1-101 Mar 2003

Va. Code Ann. § 9.1-101

Capital Defense Journal

No abstract provided.


Defense-Based Victim Outreach: Restorative Justice In Capital Cases, Kristen F. Grunewald, Priya Nath Mar 2003

Defense-Based Victim Outreach: Restorative Justice In Capital Cases, Kristen F. Grunewald, Priya Nath

Capital Defense Journal

No abstract provided.


International Law Issues In Death Penalty Defense, Richard J. Wilson Jan 2003

International Law Issues In Death Penalty Defense, Richard J. Wilson

Hofstra Law Review

No abstract provided.


Add Resources And Apply Them Systemically: Governments' Responsibilities Under The Revised Aba Capital Defense Representation Guidelines, Eric M. Freedman Jan 2003

Add Resources And Apply Them Systemically: Governments' Responsibilities Under The Revised Aba Capital Defense Representation Guidelines, Eric M. Freedman

Hofstra Law Review

The death penalty is expensive. For many reasons-including the reality that if the prosecution insists on the death penalty there is essentially no chance of a guilty plea, and the fact that the bifurcation between guilt and penalty that uniquely characterizes capital cases imposes double costs throughout the process of investigation, trial, and appeals -a state's decision to have a criminal justice system in which death is available as a sanction necessarily entails substantially higher costs than the contrary decision does.


The Professional Obligation To Raise Frivolous Issues In Death Penalty Cases, Monroe H. Freedman Jan 2003

The Professional Obligation To Raise Frivolous Issues In Death Penalty Cases, Monroe H. Freedman

Hofstra Law Review

Lawyers are generally familiar with the ethical rule forbidding frivolous arguments, principally because of sanctions imposed under rules of civil procedure for making such arguments. Not all lawyers are aware, however, of two ways in which the prohibitions of frivolous arguments are restricted in both the rules themselves and in their enforcement. First, the ethical rules have express limitations with respect to arguments made on behalf of criminal defendants, and courts are generally loath to sanction criminal defense lawyers. Second, the term "frivolous" is narrowed, even in civil cases, by the way it is defined and explained in the ethical ...


Why An Independent Appointing Authority Is Necessary To Choose Counsel For Indigent People In Capital Punishment Cases, Ronald J. Tabak Jan 2003

Why An Independent Appointing Authority Is Necessary To Choose Counsel For Indigent People In Capital Punishment Cases, Ronald J. Tabak

Hofstra Law Review

No abstract provided.


Aba Guidelines For The Appointment And Performance Of Defense Counsel In Death Penalty Cases, American Bar Association Jan 2003

Aba Guidelines For The Appointment And Performance Of Defense Counsel In Death Penalty Cases, American Bar Association

Hofstra Law Review

No abstract provided.


'The Guiding Hand Of Counsel' And The Aba Guidelines For The Appointment And Performance Of Defense Counsel In Death Penalty Cases, Robin M. Maher Jan 2003

'The Guiding Hand Of Counsel' And The Aba Guidelines For The Appointment And Performance Of Defense Counsel In Death Penalty Cases, Robin M. Maher

Hofstra Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Prostitution Of Lying In Wait, H. Mitchell Caldwell Jan 2003

The Prostitution Of Lying In Wait, H. Mitchell Caldwell

University of Miami Law Review

No abstract provided.


Atkins V. Virginia: A Psychiatric Can Of Worms, Douglas Mossman Md Jan 2003

Atkins V. Virginia: A Psychiatric Can Of Worms, Douglas Mossman Md

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

This article provides a psychiatric perspective on the problems Atkins raises for courts that handle death penalty cases. In contrast to the overarching aim of the majority's opinion in Atkins - making the administration of capital punishment more equitable - the Supreme Court's latest prescription of psychiatric help may only add a new layer of complexity and confusion to the already capricious process through which the U.S. criminal justice system imposes death sentences. The article briefly review's the Supreme Court's 1989 Penry decision, focusing on the role that evidence of mental retardation played in death penalty cases ...


The Innocence Revolution And Our "Evolving Standards Of Decency" In Death Penalty Jurisprudence, Mark A. Godsey, Thomas Pulley Jan 2003

The Innocence Revolution And Our "Evolving Standards Of Decency" In Death Penalty Jurisprudence, Mark A. Godsey, Thomas Pulley

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

One cannot adequately consider whether the current administration of the death penalty in America measures up to modern notions of decency without doing so in light of the revolution that has occurred over the past decade in the American criminal-justice system - the Innocence Revolution. Up through the 1990s, as a society, we believed our criminal-justice system was highly accurate, but the recent advent of DNA testing and other advanced technologies has demonstrated the naiveté of such beliefs. This article will discuss the history of the Innocence Revolution, examine the impact of that revolution on our society, and ask: "What should ...


Constitutional Law: Retarded Justice: The Supreme Court's Subjective Standards For Capital Punishment Of The Mentally Retarded, Daniel Nickel Jan 2003

Constitutional Law: Retarded Justice: The Supreme Court's Subjective Standards For Capital Punishment Of The Mentally Retarded, Daniel Nickel

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Compliance With Icj Provisional Measure And The Meaning Of Review And Reconsideration Under The Vienna Convention On Consular Relations: Avena And Other Mexican Nationals (Mex. V. U.S.), Linda E. Carter Jan 2003

Compliance With Icj Provisional Measure And The Meaning Of Review And Reconsideration Under The Vienna Convention On Consular Relations: Avena And Other Mexican Nationals (Mex. V. U.S.), Linda E. Carter

Michigan Journal of International Law

Many aspects of the Avena case could lead to significant developments, there are two that will be addressed in this essay. The first issue has an immediate impact on the pending executions. What must the United States do to comply with the provisional measures order? What are "all measures necessary"? The second issue will have an impact in later litigation in the cases of the fifty-two Mexican defendants named in Avena and on other future defendants. What must the United States do to provide "review and reconsideration of the conviction and sentence by taking account of the violation of the ...


Nothing Less Than The Dignity Of Man: Evolving Standards, Botched Executions And Utah's Controversial Use Of The Firing Squad , Christopher Q. Cutler Jan 2003

Nothing Less Than The Dignity Of Man: Evolving Standards, Botched Executions And Utah's Controversial Use Of The Firing Squad , Christopher Q. Cutler

Cleveland State Law Review

While outrage boils to the surface when Utah uses its firing squad option, there is little substantive legal development concerning the firing squad's use. Few cases have challenged the firing squad's constitutionality. This article discusses the legal and political implications of the firing squad. Using the Supreme Court's everdeveloping Eighth Amendment jurisprudence as a guide, this article discusses whether the firing squad, both historically and in its present application, passes constitutional muster. Beyond those factors that trigger constitutional protection, this article discusses those elements of the firing squad's use which define society's humanity and demonstrate ...


Ten Years Of Payne: Victim Impact Evidence In Capital Cases, John H. Blume Jan 2003

Ten Years Of Payne: Victim Impact Evidence In Capital Cases, John H. Blume

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

A little over a decade ago, in Payne v. Tennessee, the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for capital sentencing juries to consider “victim impact evidence” (VIE). Reversing its prior decisions in Booth v. Maryland and South Carolina v. Gathers, a six to three majority of the Court held that “if the State chooses to permit the admission of victim impact evidence and prosecutorial argument on that subject, the Eighth Amendment erects no per se bar.” Part I of this Article will discuss the Court’s prior decisions in Booth and Gathers, and Parts II and III will briefly ...


The Cognitive Components Of Punishment, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Forest Jourden Jan 2003

The Cognitive Components Of Punishment, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Forest Jourden

Cornell Law Faculty Publications



Victim Impact Statements In Capital Trials: A Selected Bibliography, Jean M. Callihan Jan 2003

Victim Impact Statements In Capital Trials: A Selected Bibliography, Jean M. Callihan

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Victim Characteristics And Victim Impact Evidence In South Carolina Capital Cases, Theodore Eisenberg, Stephen P. Garvey, Martin T. Wells Jan 2003

Victim Characteristics And Victim Impact Evidence In South Carolina Capital Cases, Theodore Eisenberg, Stephen P. Garvey, Martin T. Wells

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The use of victim impact evidence (VIE) has been a standard feature of capital trials since 1991, when the Supreme Court lifted the previously existing constitutional bar to such evidence. Legal scholars have almost universally condemned the use of VIE, criticizing it on a variety of grounds. Yet little empirical analysis exists that examines how VIE influences the course and outcome of capital trials. We analyze the influence of VIE based on interviews with over two-hundred jurors who sat on capital trials in South Carolina between 1985 and 2001.

First, we describe the VIE introduced at sentencing trials, using a ...


Rethinking The Death Penalty: Can We Define Who Deserves Death?, Martin Leahy, Robert Blecker, William M. Erlbaum, Jeffrey Fagan, Norman Greene, Jeffrey Kirchmeier, David Von Drehle Jan 2003

Rethinking The Death Penalty: Can We Define Who Deserves Death?, Martin Leahy, Robert Blecker, William M. Erlbaum, Jeffrey Fagan, Norman Greene, Jeffrey Kirchmeier, David Von Drehle

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


Roots "Resolving The Death Penalty: Wisdom From The Ancients", Robert Blecker Jan 2003

Roots "Resolving The Death Penalty: Wisdom From The Ancients", Robert Blecker

Articles & Chapters

Lest it be cruel and unusual, the U.S. Supreme Court has held, capital punishment must be consistent with the evolving standards of decency of a maturing society. Although controversy swirls around our current sense of decency, this Society's changing standards are largely the product of deeply embedded traditions and an unchanging cultural core. Thus, virtually every heated death penalty debate today requires us not only to take the temperature of the people, but also to appreciate their temperament.

ROOTS: Resolving the Death Penalty: Wisdom from the Ancients reflects the current controversy back onto the core of Western Culture ...