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2003

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Copyright

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 20 of 20

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Balancing Act Of Copyright: The Copyright Laws Of Australia And The United States In The Digital Era, Dilan J. Thampapillai Nov 2003

The Balancing Act Of Copyright: The Copyright Laws Of Australia And The United States In The Digital Era, Dilan J. Thampapillai

Cornell Law School J.D. Student Research Papers

The digital era has posed a unique challenge to copyright law. The emergence of the information technology revolution and the internet has increased the ability and the willingness of copyright users to copy and distribute protected material. In response to this phenomenon copyright owners have pushed for stronger laws to protect their content from infringement. Their success has prompted a strong counter reaction from copyright users and consumer groups.

This paper seeks to examine how changes to Australian and US copyright law have resulted in an imbalance between owners and users and whether the traditional safeguards of fair dealing and ...


Copyrighting Facts, Michael S. Green Oct 2003

Copyrighting Facts, Michael S. Green

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Introduction: Rights Of Attribution, Section 43(A) Of The Lanham Act, And The Copyright Public Domain, Tyler T. Ochoa Jul 2003

Introduction: Rights Of Attribution, Section 43(A) Of The Lanham Act, And The Copyright Public Domain, Tyler T. Ochoa

Faculty Publications

In Dastar Corporation v. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the former owner of the copyright in a "work made for hire" has a federal right of attribution that continues to exist even after the formerly copyrighted work has entered the public domain.

Fifteen intellectual property law professors filed anamicus brief in the case in support of the Petitioner. The brief, which is reprinted following this introduction, attempts to place the Dastar case in its historical context, as merely the latest effort on the part of former copyright owners to use trademark and ...


A Primer On U.S. Intellectual Property Rights Applicable To Music Information Retrieval Systems, Michael Carroll Apr 2003

A Primer On U.S. Intellectual Property Rights Applicable To Music Information Retrieval Systems, Michael Carroll

PIJIP Faculty Scholarship

Digital technology has had a significant impact on the ways in which music information can be stored, transmitted, and used. Within the information sciences, music information retrieval has become an increasingly important and complex field. This brief article is addressed primarily to those involved in the design and implementation of systems for storing and retrieving digital files containing musical notation, recorded music, and relevant metadata – hereinafter referred to as a Music Information Retrieval System (“MIRS”). In particular, this group includes information specialists, software engineers, and the attorneys who advise them. Although peer-to-peer computer applications, such as Napster’s MusicShare or ...


What's Wrong With Eldred? An Essay On Copyright Jurisprudence, L. Ray Patterson Apr 2003

What's Wrong With Eldred? An Essay On Copyright Jurisprudence, L. Ray Patterson

Scholarly Works

With few exceptions, the U.S. Supreme Court has rendered wise copyright decisions consistent with the Copyright Clause. Unfortunately, Eldred v. Ashcroft adds to the exceptions. The difference is that the former are positive law, and the latter natural law, decisions.


"Book Review Of Controlling Voices: Intellectual Property, Humanistic Studies, And The Internet", James S. Heller Jan 2003

"Book Review Of Controlling Voices: Intellectual Property, Humanistic Studies, And The Internet", James S. Heller

Library Staff Publications

No abstract provided.


Ideas, Artifacts, And Facilities: Information As A Common-Pool Resource, Charlotte Hess, Elinor Ostrom Jan 2003

Ideas, Artifacts, And Facilities: Information As A Common-Pool Resource, Charlotte Hess, Elinor Ostrom

Libraries' and Librarians' Publications

"The goal of this paper is to summarize the lessons learned from a large body of international, interdisciplinary research on common-pool resources (CPRs) in the past 25 years and consider its usefulness in the analysis of scholarly information as a resource. We will suggest ways in which the study of the governance and management of common-pool resources can be applied to the analysis of information and 'the intellectual public domain.' The complexity of the issues is enormous for many reasons: the vast number of players, multiple conflicting interests, rapid changes of technology, the general lack of understanding of digital technologies ...


The Functions Of Transaction Costs: Rethinking Transaction Cost Minimization In A World Of Friction, David M. Driesen, Shubha Ghosh Jan 2003

The Functions Of Transaction Costs: Rethinking Transaction Cost Minimization In A World Of Friction, David M. Driesen, Shubha Ghosh

College of Law - Faculty Scholarship

This article critically examines the goal of minimizing transaction costs, including the costs of legal decision-making. This goal permeates the law and economics literature and has profoundly influenced public policy. While most transaction cost scholarship has focused upon private law, this influence has been especially pervasive in public law, where it has contributed to a variety of legal changes aimed at reducing public transaction costs, often through privatization.

We argue that transaction costs perform useful functions. They frequently enable those engaging in transactions to obtain information needed to correct for information asymmetries or inadequate information. They facilitate efficient transactions, allow ...


How Dewey Classify Oclc's Lawsuit, Roger V. Skalbeck Jan 2003

How Dewey Classify Oclc's Lawsuit, Roger V. Skalbeck

Law Faculty Publications

In order to understand the nature of the rights asserted here, it is important to properly classify the Dewey Decimal lawsuit. To these ends, this article presents analysis aimed to better define its scope and legal framework. This is not an analysis of the merits of the claims, let alone a prediction as to the outcome. The issues are considered in the following three sections. In closing, I offer a lighthearted suggestion as to how this suit might be resolved outside of litigation or settlement.


Spiritual But Not Intellectual? The Protection Of Sacred Intangible Traditional Knowledge, Daniel J. Gervais Jan 2003

Spiritual But Not Intellectual? The Protection Of Sacred Intangible Traditional Knowledge, Daniel J. Gervais

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

The use of sacred aboriginal art is nothing new. It is fairly common to see dream catchers hanging from rear view mirrors in cars. In Australia, sacred aboriginal designs are often found on tea towels, rugs and restaurant placemats. In the United States, people routinely Commercialize Navajo rugs containing both sacred and profane designs with no connection to the Navajo nation. Millions of dollars of Indian crafts imported from Asia are sold in the United States each year. Another example is the taking of sacred Ami chants by the German rock group Enigma for its song Return to Innocence. Can ...


Fragmented Copyright, Fragmented Management: Proposals To Defrag Copyright Management, Daniel J. Gervais, Alana Maurushat Jan 2003

Fragmented Copyright, Fragmented Management: Proposals To Defrag Copyright Management, Daniel J. Gervais, Alana Maurushat

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

The collective management of copyright in Canada was conceived as a solution to alleviate the problem of inefficiency of individual rights management. Creators could not license, collect and enforce copyright efficiently on an individual basis. Requiring users to obtain permission from individual copyright holders for the use of a work was equally inefficient. Collectives, therefore, emerged to facilitate the clearance of rights between creators and users. Even with the facilitation of collectives in the process, clearing rights remains an inherently difficult and convoluted process. This is especially so in the age of the Internet where clearing rights for multimedia products ...


New Surveillance, The , Sonia K. Katyal Jan 2003

New Surveillance, The , Sonia K. Katyal

Faculty Scholarship

A few years ago, it was fanciful to imagine a world where intellectual property owners - such as record companies, software owners, and publishers - were capable of invading the most sacred areas of the home in order to track, deter, and control uses of their products. Yet, today, strategies of copyright enforcement have rapidly multiplied, each strategy more invasive than the last. This new surveillance exposes the paradoxical nature of the Internet: It offers both the consumer and creator a seemingly endless capacity for human expression - a virtual marketplace of ideas - alongside an insurmountable array of capacities for panoptic surveillance. As ...


An Exclusive Right To Evoke, Stacey Dogan Jan 2003

An Exclusive Right To Evoke, Stacey Dogan

Faculty Scholarship

Ten years ago, in White v. Samsung Electronics America, the Ninth Circuit held that a robot violated Vanna White's publicity rights. Since the White decision, the tendency to equate evocation with infringement in trademark and right of publicity cases has only grown. In contrast to this expansionist trend in trademark and right of publicity law, however, courts in recent copyright cases have arguably backed off from a strong right to evoke. This Article identifies these trends and suggests some reasons for concern over an exclusive right to evoke. The author argues that if we wish to preserve a rich ...


Controlling Opportunistic And Anti-Competitive Intellectual Property Litigation, Michael Meurer Jan 2003

Controlling Opportunistic And Anti-Competitive Intellectual Property Litigation, Michael Meurer

Faculty Scholarship

It is useful to think of intellectual property (IP) law both as a system of property rights that promotes the production of valuable information and as a system of government regulation that unintentionally promotes socially harmful rent-seeking. This Article analyzes methods of controlling rent-seeking costs associated with opportunistic and anti-competitive IP lawsuits. My thinking is guided to some extent by the analysis of procedural measures for controlling frivolous litigation, and analysis of antitrust reforms designed to control strategic abuse of antitrust law. These analogies lead me to focus on pre-trial and post-trial control measures that reduce the credibility of weak ...


Code Versus The Common Law, Stacey Dogan Jan 2003

Code Versus The Common Law, Stacey Dogan

Faculty Scholarship

The explosion of peer-to-peer file sharing has forced a reexamination of the essential structure of copyright law in the United States. In a digital, interconnected world, the dispersion of copying and distribution activities makes it more difficult for copyright holders to identify users who derive value from their works. And at least theoretically, the inability to capture such value could ultimately jeopardize the incentive to produce and distribute creative expression.

There is widespread disagreement over what, if anything, should be done about these threats. While suggestions range from copyright abandonment to digital lockup, two of the principal proposals share an ...


Begged, Borrowed Or Stolen: Whose Art Is It, Anyway - An Alternative Solution Of Fine Art Licensing, Judith Bresler Jan 2003

Begged, Borrowed Or Stolen: Whose Art Is It, Anyway - An Alternative Solution Of Fine Art Licensing, Judith Bresler

Articles & Chapters

Part II


Regulatory Challenges And Models Of Regulation, Philip J. Weiser Jan 2003

Regulatory Challenges And Models Of Regulation, Philip J. Weiser

Articles

No abstract provided.


Reconstructing The Software License, Michael J. Madison Jan 2003

Reconstructing The Software License, Michael J. Madison

Articles

This article analyzes the legitimacy of the software license as a institution of governance for computer programs. The question of the open source license is used as a starting point. Having conducted a broader inquiry into the several possible bases for the legitimacy of software licensing in general, the article argues that none of the grounds on which software licensing in general rests are sound. With respect to open source software in particular, the article concludes that achieving a legitimate institutional form for the goals that open source proponents have set for themselves may require looking beyond licensing as such.


Rights Of Access And The Shape Of The Internet, Michael J. Madison Jan 2003

Rights Of Access And The Shape Of The Internet, Michael J. Madison

Articles

This Article reviews recent developments in the law of access to information, that is, cases involving click-through agreements, the doctrine of trespass to chattels, the anti-circumvention provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, and civil claims under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Though the objects of these different doctrines substantially overlap, the different doctrines yield different presumptions regarding the respective rights of information owners and information consumers. The Article reviews those presumptions in light of different metaphorical premises on which courts rely: Internet-as-place, in the trespass, DMCA, and CFAA contexts, and contract-as-assent, in the click-through context. It argues that ...


A Primer On U.S. Intellectual Property Rights Applicable To Music Information Retrieval Systems, Michael W. Carroll Jan 2003

A Primer On U.S. Intellectual Property Rights Applicable To Music Information Retrieval Systems, Michael W. Carroll

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Digital technology has had a significant impact on the ways in which music information can be stored, transmitted, and used. Within the information sciences, music information retrieval has become an increasingly important and complex field. This brief article is addressed primarily to those involved in the design and implementation of systems for storing and retrieving digital files containing musical notation, recorded music, and relevant metadata – hereinafter referred to as a Music Information Retrieval System (“MIRS”). In particular, this group includes information specialists, software engineers, and the attorneys who advise them. Although peer-to-peer computer applications, such as Napster’s MusicShare or ...