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Articles 61 - 77 of 77

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Real-World Shift In Criminal Procedure, Stephanos Bibas Jan 2003

The Real-World Shift In Criminal Procedure, Stephanos Bibas

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Unitary Executive During The Second Half-Century, Steven G. Calabresi, Christopher S. Yoo Jan 2003

The Unitary Executive During The Second Half-Century, Steven G. Calabresi, Christopher S. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Recent Supreme Court decisions and political events have reinvigorated the debate over Congress's authority to restrict the President's control over the administration of the law. The initial debate focused on whether the Constitutional Convention rejected the executive by committee employed by the Articles of the Confederation in favor of a unitary executive in which all administrative authority is centralized in the President. More recently, the debate has turned towards historical practices. Some scholars have suggested that independent agencies and special counsels have become such established features of the constitutional landscape as to preempt arguments in favor of the ...


New Models Of Regulation And Interagency Governance, Christopher S. Yoo Jan 2003

New Models Of Regulation And Interagency Governance, Christopher S. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Harm, History, And Counterfactuals, Stephen R. Perry Jan 2003

Harm, History, And Counterfactuals, Stephen R. Perry

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


No Other Gods: Answering The Call Of Faith In The Practice Of Law, Howard Lesnick Jan 2003

No Other Gods: Answering The Call Of Faith In The Practice Of Law, Howard Lesnick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Direct And Collateral Federal Court Review Of The Adequacy Of State Procedural Rules, Catherine T. Struve Jan 2003

Direct And Collateral Federal Court Review Of The Adequacy Of State Procedural Rules, Catherine T. Struve

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

103 Colum. L. Rev. 243 (2003)


Getting Off The Dole: Why The Court Should Abandon Its Spending Doctrine And How A Too-Clever Congress Could Provoke It To Do So, Mitchell N. Berman Jan 2003

Getting Off The Dole: Why The Court Should Abandon Its Spending Doctrine And How A Too-Clever Congress Could Provoke It To Do So, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Final Report Of The Kentucky Penal Code Revision Project, Paul H. Robinson, Kentucky Criminal Justice Council Staff Jan 2003

Final Report Of The Kentucky Penal Code Revision Project, Paul H. Robinson, Kentucky Criminal Justice Council Staff

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The Kentucky Criminal Justice Council, a constitutional body in Kentucky, undertook this project to examine the problems with Kentucky criminal law and to rewrite the Kentucky criminal code. This two-volume Final Report of the Kentucky Penal Code Revision Project proposes a new criminal code, in volume 1, together with an official commentary, in volume 2, that explains each provision and how and why it differs from existing law. The introduction to the Report summarizes the reasons for and the importance of criminal code reform, and describes the techniques used in this rewrite project, including both the project’s drafting principles ...


The Value Of Giving Away Secrets, Oren Bar-Gill, Gideon Parchomovsky Jan 2003

The Value Of Giving Away Secrets, Oren Bar-Gill, Gideon Parchomovsky

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This Essay demonstrates the strategic advantage of narrow patents and unprotected publication of R&D output. Broad patents might stifle follow-on improvements by deterring potential cumulative innovators, who fear being held up by the initial inventor at the ex post licensing stage. By opting for a narrower patent and unprotected publication, the initial patent holder commits not to hold up follow-on inventors, thus promoting sequential innovation and generating lucrative licensing fees. Counterintuitively, in cumulative innovation settings, less protection benefits the patentee. This finding may serve as a counter-force to the much-lamented "anti-commons" problem. More generally, our theory demonstrates that the divergence between private interests and social objectives - on both the static and dynamic dimensions of intellectual property - is not as great as conventionally believed. Our theory bridges yet another gap; that between the two main theoretic strands in patent law scholarship - the property rights perspective and the information revelation perspective. It also explains the recent trend toward unprotected publication of information. Finally, we propose an important reform of the novelty requirement in patent law that would further encourage narrow patents and unprotected publication by bolstering the credibility of a patentees commitment not to patent previously published research findings.


Speaking Volumes: Musings On The Issues Of The Day, Inspired By The Memory Of Mary Joe Frug, Regina Austin, Elizabeth M. Schneider Jan 2003

Speaking Volumes: Musings On The Issues Of The Day, Inspired By The Memory Of Mary Joe Frug, Regina Austin, Elizabeth M. Schneider

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Can Majority Voting Provisions Do It All?, David A. Skeel Jr. Jan 2003

Can Majority Voting Provisions Do It All?, David A. Skeel Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Turf Struggle: Land, Sovereignty, And Sovereign Immunity, Catherine T. Struve Jan 2003

Turf Struggle: Land, Sovereignty, And Sovereign Immunity, Catherine T. Struve

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Information Wants To Be Free: Intellectual Property And The Mythologies Of Control, R. Polk Wagner Jan 2003

Information Wants To Be Free: Intellectual Property And The Mythologies Of Control, R. Polk Wagner

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Bush Administration's Response To The International Criminal Court, Jean Galbraith Jan 2003

The Bush Administration's Response To The International Criminal Court, Jean Galbraith

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Before And After: Temporal Anomalies In Legal Doctrine, Leo Katz Jan 2003

Before And After: Temporal Anomalies In Legal Doctrine, Leo Katz

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Role Of Deterrence In The Formulation Of Criminal Law Rules: At Its Worst When Doing Its Best, Paul H. Robinson Jan 2003

The Role Of Deterrence In The Formulation Of Criminal Law Rules: At Its Worst When Doing Its Best, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

For the past several decades, the deterrence of crime has been a centerpiece of criminal law reform. Law-givers have sought to optimize the control of crime by devising a penalty-setting system that assigns criminal punishments of a magnitude sufficient to deter a thinking individual from committing a crime. Although this seems initially an intuitively compelling strategy, we are going to suggest that is a poor one; poor for two reasons. First, its effectiveness rests on a set of assumptions that on examination cannot be sustained. Second, the attempt to employ the strategy generates a good many crimogenic costs that are ...


Corporate Constitutionalism: Antitakeover Charter Provisions As Pre-Commitment, Marcel Kahan, Edward B. Rock Jan 2003

Corporate Constitutionalism: Antitakeover Charter Provisions As Pre-Commitment, Marcel Kahan, Edward B. Rock

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Constitutions constitute a polity and create and entrench power. A corporate constitution - the governance choices incorporated in state law and the certificate of incorporation - resembles a political constitution. Delaware law allows parties to create corporations, to endow them with perpetual life, to assign rights and duties to "citizens" (directors and shareholders), to adopt a great variety of governance structures, and to entrench those choices. In this Article, we argue that the decision to endow directors with significant power over decisions whether and how to sell the company is a constitutional choice of governance structure. We then argue that it is ...