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Full-Text Articles in Law

First Options, Consent To Arbitration, And The Demise Of Separability: Restoring Access To Justice For Contracts With Arbitration Provisions, Richard C. Reuben Apr 2003

First Options, Consent To Arbitration, And The Demise Of Separability: Restoring Access To Justice For Contracts With Arbitration Provisions, Richard C. Reuben

Faculty Publications

This article describes the context and current state of the law in this area under the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA), urges the Court to continue its path toward actual consent to arbitration, and suggests an approach for finally reconciling the tension between Prima Paint and First Options. Part II describes the nature and historical context of the arbitrability problem. Part III focuses specifically on the doctrine of separability, which is the most critical (and most complex) of these exceptions. Part IV discusses the impact on separability of recent U.S. Supreme Court case law, especially the 1995 decision in First ...


The Unruliness Of Rules, Peter A. Alces Jan 2003

The Unruliness Of Rules, Peter A. Alces

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Latcrit Vi, Outsider Jurisprudence And Looking Beyond Imagined Borders, Ediberto Román Jan 2003

Latcrit Vi, Outsider Jurisprudence And Looking Beyond Imagined Borders, Ediberto Román

Faculty Publications

The Sixth Annual LatCrit Conference (LatCrit VI) titled "Latinas/os and the Americas: Centering North-South Frameworks in LatCrit Theory," was the latest installment of the leading progressive scholarly movement addressing nonwhite critical jurisprudence.3 The goals of the conference were to explore the ties that bind Latinas/os residing in the United States to their homeland's societies and cultures, and to examine the impact of globalization on critical jurisprudential discourse.4 The conference was attended predominately by straight and gay law professors of color, including Latinas/os, African Americans, Asian Americans, and indigenous persons, most of whom describe themselves ...