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2003

Social Welfare Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Progressivist Origins Of The 2003 California Gubernatorial Recall, Kira L. Klatchko Dec 2003

Progressivist Origins Of The 2003 California Gubernatorial Recall, Kira L. Klatchko

ExpressO

Progressivist Origins of the 2003 California Gubernatorial Recall, was written in Sacramento in the midst of the first statewide recall of an elected official in California. The paper explores the nature of the recall procedure and its implementation in the state, and is chiefly an inquiry into the relatedness of the current incarnation and its Progressivist root. It focuses particularly on the recall of Governor Gray Davis, and details how shifting attitudes towards public participation have altered the procedure over time.


Social Welfare, Human Dignity, And The Puzzle Of What We Owe Each Other, Amy L. Wax Dec 2003

Social Welfare, Human Dignity, And The Puzzle Of What We Owe Each Other, Amy L. Wax

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Proponents of work-based welfare reform claim that moving the poor from welfare to work will advance the goals of economic self-reliance and independence. Reform opponents attack these objectives as ideologically motivated and conceptually incoherent. Drawing on perspectives developed by luck egalitarians and feminist theorists, these critics disparage conventional notions of economic desert, find fault with market measures of value, debunk ideals of autonomy, and emphasize the pervasiveness of interdependence and unearned benefits within free market societies. These arguments pose an important challenge to justifications usually advanced for work-based welfare reform. Reform proponents must concede that no member of society can ...


Enabling Work For People With Disabilities: A Post-Integrationist Revision Of Underutilized Tax Incentives, Francine J. Lipman Dec 2003

Enabling Work For People With Disabilities: A Post-Integrationist Revision Of Underutilized Tax Incentives, Francine J. Lipman

American University Law Review

Federal employment strategies for people with disabilities do not seem to be working. Scholars argue that the Americans with Disabilities Act and similar legislation that exemplify the disability theory of integrationism with the goal of integrating people with disabilities into mainstream employment cannot succeed. Society cannot eradicate barriers to employment for people with disabilities simply by the integrationist modest approach of reasonable accommodation. A post-integrationist approach may be required to provide legitimate equal employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

In December 2002, the General Accounting Office released its report on its study of three federal business tax incentives to encourage ...


Legal Issues Involving Children, Robert E. Shepherd Jr. Nov 2003

Legal Issues Involving Children, Robert E. Shepherd Jr.

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Booze, Drugs, And Rock & Roll: Crime During The College Years, Paul S. Gutman Oct 2003

Booze, Drugs, And Rock & Roll: Crime During The College Years, Paul S. Gutman

ExpressO

In this Article, the author examines the predilection of college and university students towards certain types of illegal behaviors. Specifically, the Article considers the widespread instances of drug use, under-age alcohol use, and "file-sharing" using Napster and its progeny. The Article's main focus is on why such illegal behaviors are rampant among college students who might otherwise be


Three Steps And You're Out: The Misuse Of The Sequential Evaluation Process In Child Ssi Disability Determinations, Frank S. Bloch Oct 2003

Three Steps And You're Out: The Misuse Of The Sequential Evaluation Process In Child Ssi Disability Determinations, Frank S. Bloch

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program provides cash benefits to financially needy persons who are 65 years of age or older, blind, or disabled. It also provides cash benefits to children with disabilities under the age of 18. This Article examines three sets of regulatory efforts to implement special disability standards for children, based first on the original SSI legislation, then on a seminal Supreme Court decision, and finally on amendments to the Social Security Act overruling the Court's decision, and shows how the "sequential evaluation process," which has been useful for adjudicating adult disability claims, has been ...


A Crisis Of Caring: A Catholic Critique Of American Welfare Reform, Vincent D. Rougeau Oct 2003

A Crisis Of Caring: A Catholic Critique Of American Welfare Reform, Vincent D. Rougeau

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The current deterioration of the American economy is bringing new attention to the problem of poverty in the United States. After falling over the last few years, the number of Americans living in poverty has begun to rise once again. Notwithstanding the achievements of recent "welfare reforms," the American poor continue to be numerous by any measure.

Unfortunately, decades of affluence have exacerbated American tendencies to view liberal concepts such as freedom, autonomy, tolerance, and choice in ways that accentuate personal autonomy over community integration. These liberal values have been increasingly unhinged from strong countervailing principles like duty and responsibility ...


Biological Factors Associated With Aggression And Violent Behavior: A Comparative Analysis Of Scientific, Societal, And Legal Dimensions, Troy M. Bear Sep 2003

Biological Factors Associated With Aggression And Violent Behavior: A Comparative Analysis Of Scientific, Societal, And Legal Dimensions, Troy M. Bear

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


The Philadelphia Story: The Rhetoric Of School Reform, Susan Dejarnatt Sep 2003

The Philadelphia Story: The Rhetoric Of School Reform, Susan Dejarnatt

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Procreative Freedom And Convicted Criminals In The United States And The United Kingdom: Is Child Welfare Becoming The New Eugenics?, Elaine E. Sutherland Sep 2003

Procreative Freedom And Convicted Criminals In The United States And The United Kingdom: Is Child Welfare Becoming The New Eugenics?, Elaine E. Sutherland

ExpressO

International law rightly accords procreative freedom a high order of respect and it is easy to understand why that is so. Eugenics, which was advanced initially with good intentions in the belief that it was, indeed, scientific, provides us with a clear example of the dangers that can result from failing to respect procreative freedom. Usually the law in the various parts of the US and the UK mirrors international law’s respect for procreative freedom. Another principle, promoted by international law and, again, given considerable prominence in US and UK jurisprudence, is that the welfare of the child is ...


The "No Property" Problem: Understanding Poverty By Understanding Wealth, Jane Baron Sep 2003

The "No Property" Problem: Understanding Poverty By Understanding Wealth, Jane Baron

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Efficiency And Social Citizenship: Challenging The Neoliberal Attack On The Welfare State, Martha T. Mccluskey Jul 2003

Efficiency And Social Citizenship: Challenging The Neoliberal Attack On The Welfare State, Martha T. Mccluskey

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Lonely Pragmatist: Humanitarian Intervention In An Imperfect World, David Vessel May 2003

The Lonely Pragmatist: Humanitarian Intervention In An Imperfect World, David Vessel

Brigham Young University Journal of Public Law

No abstract provided.


What (If Anything) Can Economics Say About Equity?, Daniel A. Farber May 2003

What (If Anything) Can Economics Say About Equity?, Daniel A. Farber

Michigan Law Review

Does economics have anything to teach us about the meaning of fairness? The leading practitioners of law and economics disagree. Judge Richard Posner argues that economics is largely irrelevant to distributive issues. Posner maintains that the most useful economic measure of social welfare is cost-benefit analysis (which he calls wealth maximization). But, he observes, this economic measure "ratifies and perfects an essentially arbitrary distribution of wealth." Given an ethically acceptable initial assignment of wealth, rules based on economic efficiency may have some claim to be considered fair. On the critical issue of distributional equity, however, Posner apparently believes that economics ...


The New Privacy, Paul M. Schwartz, William M. Treanor May 2003

The New Privacy, Paul M. Schwartz, William M. Treanor

Michigan Law Review

In 1964, as the welfare state emerged in full force in the United States, Charles Reich published The New Property, one of the most influential articles ever to appear in a law review. Reich argued that in order to protect individual autonomy in an "age of governmental largess," a new property right in governmental benefits had to be recognized. He called this form of property the "new property." In retrospect, Reich, rather than anticipating trends, was swimming against the tide of history. In the past forty years, formal claims to government benefits have become more tenuous rather than more secure ...


Of Child Welfare And Welfare Reform: The Implications For Children When Contradictory Policies Collide, Kay P. Kindred Apr 2003

Of Child Welfare And Welfare Reform: The Implications For Children When Contradictory Policies Collide, Kay P. Kindred

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Manual De Derecho Procesal Civil, Edward Ivan Cueva Feb 2003

Manual De Derecho Procesal Civil, Edward Ivan Cueva

Edward Ivan Cueva

No abstract provided.


Should We All Be Welfare Economists?, Richard H. Fallon Jr. Feb 2003

Should We All Be Welfare Economists?, Richard H. Fallon Jr.

Michigan Law Review

On what normative foundation should the edifice of law and public policy be built? What are proper grounds for claims of individual right, and how, generally, do those grounds relate to considerations of individual well-being and social welfare? In this Essay, I argue that individual well-being and a related concept of social welfare should be important considerations in the design of legal rules, but not the exclusive ones. When the notion of well-being receives substantive content, the most plausible and attractive definitions all allow a distinction between what will best promote a person's well-being and what that person might ...


New Jersey Supreme Court To Consider Controversial Family Cap Welfare Provision, Jessica Hunter Jan 2003

New Jersey Supreme Court To Consider Controversial Family Cap Welfare Provision, Jessica Hunter

Public Interest Law Reporter

No abstract provided.


The Immigration Paradox: Poverty, Distributive Justice, And Liberal Egalitarianism, Howard F. Chang Jan 2003

The Immigration Paradox: Poverty, Distributive Justice, And Liberal Egalitarianism, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The immigration of unskilled workers poses a fundamental problem for liberals. While from the perspective of the economic welfare of natives, the optimal policy would be to admit these aliens as guest workers, this policy would violate liberal egalitarian ideals. These ideals would treat these resident workers as equals, entitled to access to citizenship and to the full set of public benefits provided to citizens. If the welfare of all incumbent residents determines admissions policies, however, and we anticipate the fiscal burden that the immigration of the poor would impose, then our welfare criterion would preclude the admission of unskilled ...


Reciprocal Effects Of Crime And Incarceration In New York City Neighborhoods, Jeffrey Fagan, Valerie West, Jan Holland Jan 2003

Reciprocal Effects Of Crime And Incarceration In New York City Neighborhoods, Jeffrey Fagan, Valerie West, Jan Holland

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Article identifies and estimates the ecological dynamics of increasing spatial and social concentration of incarcerated individuals in urban neighborhoods using data from New York City between 1985 and 1997. It argues that this dynamic becomes self-sustaining and reinforcing over time. In conclusion, the Article discusses how high incarceration rates impact the relationships between citizens and the law, directly affecting residents and influencing policy preferences of non-residents.


Damage To Family Relationships As A Collateral Consequence Of Parental Incarceration, Philip M. Genty Jan 2003

Damage To Family Relationships As A Collateral Consequence Of Parental Incarceration, Philip M. Genty

Fordham Urban Law Journal

A review of available statistical information shows the irreversible and detrimental impact on parents and children of family separation due to imprisonment. Specifically, it looks to data on parental incarceration, the impact of incarceration upon families, and the difficulties of remedying the consequences to families of parental incarceration. Finally, the Article argues that alternatives to imprisonment should be used where the parent is not subject to high security confinement and that the parental role should be a relevant factor in sentencing.


Religious Values, Legal Ethics, And Poverty Law: A Response To Thomas Shaffer, Stephen Wizner Jan 2003

Religious Values, Legal Ethics, And Poverty Law: A Response To Thomas Shaffer, Stephen Wizner

Fordham Urban Law Journal

Stephen Wizner provides a response to Thomas Shaffer's article on his pursuit of social justice through using religious figures as role models. Wizner argues that Shaffer is clearly right in asserting that there is much in the prophetic literature, and, indeed, in the entire Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, that could serve as a moral impetus for social justice lawyering. One can find considerable support for Shaffer's religious thesis in the texts that he cites, and in the words of the prophets he looks to as role models. Nevertheless, Wizner presents a skeptical response to Professor Shaffer ...


Is There Hope For Hope Vi?: Community Economic Development And Localism, Ngai Pindell Jan 2003

Is There Hope For Hope Vi?: Community Economic Development And Localism, Ngai Pindell

Scholarly Works

HOPE VI is a competitively funded, public housing redevelopment program with several competing goals. First, it seeks to revitalize deteriorated inner city communities. Second, the program attempts to transform dense, high-rise public housing that has housed the lowest income tenants into developments that are more integrated with surrounding communities in terms of architecture, economics, and aesthetics. Third, the program aspires to provide public housing residents opportunities for social and economic mobility through improvements in physical design and program offerings. The HOPE VI design encompasses demolishing existing "distressed" public housing developments, rebuilding these developments with fewer public housing units, and housing ...


Something For Nothing: Liberal Justice And Welfare Work Requirements, Amy L. Wax Jan 2003

Something For Nothing: Liberal Justice And Welfare Work Requirements, Amy L. Wax

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


On Statutory Rape, Strict Liability, And The Public Welfare Offense Model, Catherine L. Carpenter Jan 2003

On Statutory Rape, Strict Liability, And The Public Welfare Offense Model, Catherine L. Carpenter

American University Law Review

Statutory Rape. At the center of a long-standing debate on whether its commission should require proof of a criminal mens rea, the prosecution of statutory rape offers a revealing look at the struggle to demarcate the parameters of the public welfare offense doctrine. Specifically, with respect to statutory rape, disagreement is deep and entrenched on whether statutory rape should be categorized as a public welfare offense, which would render irrelevant defendant's lack of knowledge of the victim's age. And despite wholesale revamping of state statutory rape laws on issues of age, gender, and potential grading and punishment, the ...


La Bodega De La Familia: Supporting Parolees' Reintegration Within A Family Context, Jeanne Flavin, David Rosenthal Jan 2003

La Bodega De La Familia: Supporting Parolees' Reintegration Within A Family Context, Jeanne Flavin, David Rosenthal

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This essay discusses how Family Justice and La Bodega de la Familia respond to the diverse challenges of reintegration post incarceration. It also discusses the benefits of a model of judicial supervision that recognizes individuals' social locations within their families and communities. With the goal of producing more effective and humane prisoner reintegration, especially in the context of drug offenses, the Authors recommend family case management. They additionally encourage parole and criminal justice practice to shift its focus from the individual parolee to families and their strengths.


The Biblical Prophets As Lawyers For The Poor, Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 2003

The Biblical Prophets As Lawyers For The Poor, Thomas L. Shaffer

Fordham Urban Law Journal

Lawyers practicing poverty law often lack mentors and role models. This author discusses how biblical figures, who served poor people, could be mentors and role models for lawyers practicing poverty law. Prophets, and particularly prophets-as-lawyers, redefine power relationships. Shaffer discusses his personal journey through out his career in using religious guidance to help him better understand his career. He also discuss his teachings to his law students of the value of learning from prophets in their legal careers.


A Crisis Of Caring: A Catholic Critique Of American Welfare Reform, Vincent D. Rougeau Jan 2003

A Crisis Of Caring: A Catholic Critique Of American Welfare Reform, Vincent D. Rougeau

Journal Articles

The current deterioration of the American economy is bringing new attention to the problem of poverty in the United States. After falling over the last few years, the number of Americans living in poverty has begun to rise once again. Notwithstanding the achievements of recent "welfare reforms," the American poor continue to be numerous by any measure.

Unfortunately, decades of affluence have exacerbated American tendencies to view liberal concepts such as freedom, autonomy, tolerance, and choice in ways that accentuate personal autonomy over community integration. These liberal values have been increasingly unhinged from strong countervailing principles like duty and responsibility ...


Why We Need The Independent Sector: The Behavior, Law, And Ethics Of Not-For-Profit Hospitals, Jill R. Horwitz Jan 2003

Why We Need The Independent Sector: The Behavior, Law, And Ethics Of Not-For-Profit Hospitals, Jill R. Horwitz

Articles

Among the major forms of corporate ownership, the not-for-profit ownership form is distinct in its behavior, legal constraints, and moral obligations. A new empirical analysis of the American hospital industry, using eleven years of data for all urban general hospitals in the country, shows that corporate form accounts for large differences in the provision of specific medical services. Not-for-profit hospitals systematically provide both private and public goods that are in the public interest, and that other forms fail to provide. Two hypotheses are proposed to account for the findings, one legal and one moral. While no causal claims are made ...