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2003

Judges

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Valuation Averaging: A New Procedure For Resolving Valuation Disputes, Keith Sharfman Dec 2003

Valuation Averaging: A New Procedure For Resolving Valuation Disputes, Keith Sharfman

Rutgers Law School (Newark) Faculty Papers

In this Article, Professor Sharfman addresses the problem of "discretionary valuation": that courts resolve valuation disputes arbitrarily and unpredictably, thus harming litigants and society. As a solution, he proposes the enactment of "valuation averaging," a new procedure for resolving valuation disputes modeled on the algorithmic valuation processes often agreed to by sophisticated private firms in advance of any dispute. He argues that by replacing the discretion of judges and juries with a mechanical valuation process, valuation averaging would cause litigants to introduce more plausible and conciliatory valuations into evidence and thereby reduce the cost of valuation litigation and increase the ...


Different Roads To The Rule Of Law: Their Importance For Law Reform In Taiwan, James Maxeiner Dec 2003

Different Roads To The Rule Of Law: Their Importance For Law Reform In Taiwan, James Maxeiner

All Faculty Scholarship

Talk of law reform is in the air throughout East Asia. Whether in Beijing or Tokyo or here, law reform is spoken of in terms of strengthening the Rule of Law. But what is the Rule of Law? Different legal systems have different roads to reach the Rule of Law. These different roads are noticeable mainly in the different emphases different systems place on two critical elements in the realization of the Rule of Law State, namely rules and the machinery for implementing the rules, i.e., courts and administrative agencies. The Rule of Law makes demands on both the ...


Section 2: Judicial Confirmation Process, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law At The William & Mary Law School Sep 2003

Section 2: Judicial Confirmation Process, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law At The William & Mary Law School

Supreme Court Preview

No abstract provided.


Life And Death Decision-Making: Judges V. Legislators As Sources Of Law In Bioethics, Charles H. Baron Jul 2003

Life And Death Decision-Making: Judges V. Legislators As Sources Of Law In Bioethics, Charles H. Baron

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In some situations, courts may be better sources of new law than legislatures. Some support for this proposition is provided by the performance of American courts in the development of law regarding the “right to die.” When confronted with the problems presented by mid-Twentieth Century technological advances in prolonging human life, American legislators were slow to act. It was the state common law courts, beginning with Quinlan in 1976, that took primary responsibility for gradually crafting new legal principles that excepted withdrawal of life-prolonging treatment from the application of general laws dealing with homicide and suicide. These courts, like the ...


Benched: Ggu Alumni Offer Sound Judgment, Melissa Stein Jul 2003

Benched: Ggu Alumni Offer Sound Judgment, Melissa Stein

Articles About GGU Law

No abstract provided.


Approaches To Statutory Interpretation And Legislative History In France, Claire M. Germain Jul 2003

Approaches To Statutory Interpretation And Legislative History In France, Claire M. Germain

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Moral Rights, Judicial Review, And Democracy: A Response To Horacio Spector, Laura S. Underkuffler Jul 2003

Moral Rights, Judicial Review, And Democracy: A Response To Horacio Spector, Laura S. Underkuffler

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Embarrassing Justice, Donald E. Wilkes Jr. May 2003

Embarrassing Justice, Donald E. Wilkes Jr.

Popular Media

The text of the speech given by UGA Professor of Law Donald E. Wilkes, in the Tate Student Center Plaza at the University of Georgia, May 17, 2003 to protest U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas's speech at the law school graduation.


Open Letter Concerning The Invitation To Justice Clarence Thomas To Speak At The Uga School Of Law Graduation Ceremony, Donald E. Wilkes Jr. Apr 2003

Open Letter Concerning The Invitation To Justice Clarence Thomas To Speak At The Uga School Of Law Graduation Ceremony, Donald E. Wilkes Jr.

Popular Media

Dear Colleagues, Law Students, and Other Members of the Law School Community:

On Monday, November 25, 2002, the law faculty of the University of Georgia School of Law received a memorandum from Dean David Shipley which begins as follows: "I am pleased to announce that Justice Clarence Thomas has accepted the invitation extended by me, Class of 2003 President Josh Belinfante, Class of 2003 Vice President Megan Jones, and Class of 2004 Vice President Rebecca Franklin to be our graduation speaker on May 17, 2003."

The decision to invite Justice Thomas is appalling, unwise and perverse -- the embodiment of bad ...


Congress And The Making Of The Second Rehnquist Court, Neal Devins Apr 2003

Congress And The Making Of The Second Rehnquist Court, Neal Devins

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


What Gets Judges In Trouble, Richard H. Underwood Apr 2003

What Gets Judges In Trouble, Richard H. Underwood

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

I wrote this article to collect some cautionary material about “what gets judges in trouble.” I wanted something I could offer to our state judges, practitioners, and my legal ethics students. While I have never been a judge, and while I have never worked for a judicial conduct organization, I have been a law professor for almost twenty-five years and the chairman of a state bar association ethics committee for fourteen. I am not the kind of person who would refrain from holding forth just because I may not know what I am talking about.

When I started out, I ...


Rethinking Judicial Elections, Charles G. Geyh Apr 2003

Rethinking Judicial Elections, Charles G. Geyh

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Testimonial Dinner: George And Joanne Dixon, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 2003

Testimonial Dinner: George And Joanne Dixon, Roger J. Miner '56

Tributes & Testimonials

No abstract provided.


Judicial Elections, Campaign Financing, And Free Speech, Ronald D. Rotunda Jan 2003

Judicial Elections, Campaign Financing, And Free Speech, Ronald D. Rotunda

Law Faculty Articles and Research

No abstract provided.


Edmund Pendleton, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2003

Edmund Pendleton, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Judge Edmund Pendleton, was the head of the Virginia judiciary from its professionalization upon independence from Great Britain until his death. It was in his court and under his eye that John Marshall, Bushrod Washington, St. George Tucker, Spencer Roane, and the other lawyers of the first period of republican Virginia refined their legal skills. His steady example influenced in one way or another a remarkable generation of lawyers and judges.


Alj Control Of The Hearing: What Does An Alj Do About An Unruly Witness Or Obstreperous Attorney?, Allen E. Shoenberger Jan 2003

Alj Control Of The Hearing: What Does An Alj Do About An Unruly Witness Or Obstreperous Attorney?, Allen E. Shoenberger

Faculty Publications & Other Works

No abstract provided.


The Short Unhappy Judgeship Of Thurman Arnold, Spencer Weber Waller Jan 2003

The Short Unhappy Judgeship Of Thurman Arnold, Spencer Weber Waller

Faculty Publications & Other Works

No abstract provided.


Reining In The American Litigator: The New Role Of American Judges, Richard L. Marcus Jan 2003

Reining In The American Litigator: The New Role Of American Judges, Richard L. Marcus

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Eulogy: Dr. Theodore L. Biddle, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 2003

Eulogy: Dr. Theodore L. Biddle, Roger J. Miner '56

Memorials and Eulogies

No abstract provided.


Remarks, Unveiling Of The Portrait Of Judge Roger J. Miner '56, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 2003

Remarks, Unveiling Of The Portrait Of Judge Roger J. Miner '56, Roger J. Miner '56

New York Law School Events and Publications

No abstract provided.


Judicial Independence And The Ambiguity Of Article Iii Protections, Tracey E. George Jan 2003

Judicial Independence And The Ambiguity Of Article Iii Protections, Tracey E. George

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Is the federal judiciary truly an independent body? A quick glance at the Constitution would suggest the answer is yes. The Constitution provides for life tenure and a difficult removal process for federal judges that together, as the common wisdom goes, shield federal judges from the shifting winds of the more political branches and the public at large. The author of this essay argues, however, that on a closer examination of the protections provided for by the Constitution, judicial independence might be more mirage than truism. Threats to judicial independence arise not only externally through the actions of the other ...


Reforming Securities Class Actions From The Bench: Judging Fiduciaries And Fiduciary Judging, Lisa L. Casey Jan 2003

Reforming Securities Class Actions From The Bench: Judging Fiduciaries And Fiduciary Judging, Lisa L. Casey

Journal Articles

The attorneys' fees awarded to plaintiffs’ counsel in securities fraud class actions have generated controversy for years. Critics have claimed that enormous fee awards come at the expense of defrauded investors and simply spur extortionate lawsuits against issuers and other potential deep pocket defendants. Commentators also have raised concerns that plaintiffs' class action lawyers manipulated class representatives, persons who had little incentive to monitor class counsel’s activities.

To address these concerns, Congress enacted the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act ("PSLRA"). Among other things, the statute sought to protect absent class members by giving control of the litigation to lead ...


Proposed Legislation On Judicial Election Campaign Finance, Roy A. Schotland Jan 2003

Proposed Legislation On Judicial Election Campaign Finance, Roy A. Schotland

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In light of the recent extraordinary rise in judicial campaign spending, illustrated in Ohio's 2000 judicial elections (and elsewhere, and in Ohio again in 2002), we must consider improving the Model Code of Judicial Conduct. The 1999 amendments to the Code addressed campaign finance, but did not address two major problems. The first one is the absence of limits on aggregate contributions from law firms; only Texas has such limits. This gap allows large contributions from law firms to go to judges presiding in cases in which those firms participate, circumventing the recusal and disqualification triggers. The second problem ...


Remarks Of Seth P. Waxman At The Memorial Observance For Justice Byron R. White, United States Supreme Court, Seth P. Waxman Jan 2003

Remarks Of Seth P. Waxman At The Memorial Observance For Justice Byron R. White, United States Supreme Court, Seth P. Waxman

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Members of the Court, members of the family, and friends of Justice White- Alone among today's speakers, I met Justice White only late in his life. Growing up in the law, my relationship with him was the one many kids today have with Michael Jordan - I wanted to be "like White" -like the kind of man he was. I still have that aspiration. Like Byron White, I served in the Department of Justice and was altered forever by that honorable institution. And - like Justice White, in my own lesser way, I strove within the walls of this institution to ...


Recalibrating Federal Judicial Independence Symposium: Perspectives On Judicial Independence: Accountability And Separation Of Power Issues, James J. Brudney Jan 2003

Recalibrating Federal Judicial Independence Symposium: Perspectives On Judicial Independence: Accountability And Separation Of Power Issues, James J. Brudney

Faculty Scholarship

It is well settled that independent courts play a vital role in promoting rule-of-law and separation-of-powers norms. At the same time, judicial independence must be reconciled with other values that we also wish to recognize as foundational. Professor Brudney addresses two areas of controversy that are associated with the celebration of judicial autonomy in our legal culture. He first discusses the role of political and personal background factors in shaping judicial selection and influencing judicial outcomes. He explains why both the President and Congress have come to rely increasingly on such background factors when seeking to anticipate the broad contours ...


Why Judicial Elections Stink, Charles G. Geyh Jan 2003

Why Judicial Elections Stink, Charles G. Geyh

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Those who are concerned about judicial independence and accountability in the United States quite rightly focus their attention on state judicial election campaigns. It is there that the most sustained and successful efforts to threaten judicial tenure in response to isolated, unpopular judicial decisions have occurred; and it is there that escalating campaign spending has created a public perception that judges are influenced by the contributions they receive. Attempts to address these problems have been undermined by four political realities that the author refers to as "the Axiom of 80 ": Eighty percent of the public favors electing their judges; eighty ...


"Sir, Yes, Sir!": The Courts, Congress And Structural Injunctions, Mark V. Tushnet Jan 2003

"Sir, Yes, Sir!": The Courts, Congress And Structural Injunctions, Mark V. Tushnet

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This is a deeply confused book. Not that the authors' stance is unclear: They have seen federal courts in action, and they don't like what they see. Their subject is federal judicial supervision of state and local governments through injunctive decrees. The authors' position wouldn't be confused - or at least would be confused in a different way - if they dealt with injunctive decrees aimed at enforcing what the judges took to be constitutional requirements. In such cases there's at least something coherent that can be said about judges displacing democratic decision-making. Sandler and Schoenbrod, though, don't ...


The Elusive (But Worthwhile) Quest For A Diverse Bench In The New Millennium, Theresa M. Beiner Jan 2003

The Elusive (But Worthwhile) Quest For A Diverse Bench In The New Millennium, Theresa M. Beiner

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Reply--The Missing Portion, Pierre Schlag Jan 2003

A Reply--The Missing Portion, Pierre Schlag

Articles

No abstract provided.


Malignant Democracy: Core Fallacies Underlying Election Of The Judiciary, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2003

Malignant Democracy: Core Fallacies Underlying Election Of The Judiciary, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

There is no requirement of democratic theory that mandates that all public offices be filled by election. This is particularly true in modern democratic states, which are simply too large to justify the administrative burden of electing everyone who has significant responsibilities in our society.

Examples of this are everywhere in modern democracies, such as the United States and Europe. In England, for example, the Prime Minister is not directly elected by the people. Does this mean Great Britain has ceased to be a democracy? In most large, sophisticated nation-states, national cabinet officers have great power but are the political ...